Tag: science

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports


Experts agree that the rare specimen is from Mongolia

His Excellency Elbegdorj Tsakhia, President of Mongolia, appointed a delegation to inspect the Tyrannosaurus bataar dinosaur that had been the subject of a May 20, 2012 auction by Heritage Auctions in New York City. The delegation included officials from Mongolia, Canada and the United States.

The inspection took place in the New York City area, on June 5, 2012, and proceeded with the full consent and assistance of Heritage Auctions and its consignor. The paleontologists who inspected the dinosaur, at the President’s request, included:

Philip Currie, MSc, PhD, FRSC
Professor and Canada Research Chair of Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of
Alberta; and President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology

Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav, PhD
Head of Paleontological Laboratory and Museum, Mongolian Academy of Sciences

Bolor Minjin, PhD
Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs

In addition, Mark Norell, PhD, Chairman and Curator, Division of Paleontology, at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, collaborated in a report, based on his previous viewing of the dinosaur.

The paleontologists unanimously concluded that the specimen originated in Mongolia, based on unique characteristics of the Tyrannosaurus bataar. The paleontologists prepared reports, which are available for viewing via links at the bottom of this article. Dr. Currie and Dr. Norell wrote that, “The general appearance of the animal and the color of the bones indicate to us that this is the skull and skeleton of a Tarbosaurus bataar (also known as Tyrannosaurus bataar) from the Nemegt Formation of Mongolia.”

Indeed the auction catalog itself had described and publicized the specimen as a Tyrannosaurus bataar, so there has never been a dispute as to the species.

In addition to the paleontologists, the following non-scientific representatives attended the inspection:

Ann Altman, PhD
Advisor to President Elbegdorj on the Tyrannosaurus bataar issue

Baatar Choisuren
Minister/Counselor, Mongolian Embassy to the United States

Badruugan Naranzun
Director, Department of Culture and Art, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of Mongolia

Robert Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Taunya Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Puntsag Tsagaan
Senior Advisor to President Elbegdorj

Attorney Robert Painter said, “President Elbegdorj’s staff has initiated thorough research into Mongolian law concerning the preservation of cultural treasures, like this Tyrannosaurus. We have concluded that Mongolian law has not permitted export of this rare fossil out of Mongolia since at least 1961. Nonetheless, we understand that significant value was added to the specimen by the consignor through initial identification, restoration and preparation. We are also grateful for the exemplary cooperation of Heritage Auctions, the contingent buyer and the consignor, without which this inspection could have been long and needlessly delayed. All parties remain hopeful that a fair and acceptable resolution can be reached without need for additional expert opinions or litigation.”

The Mongolian delegation is now traveling back to Ulaanbaatar. Upon their return to Mongolia and reporting to President Elbegdorj, the parties will continue discussions on how to resolve this important matter.

Additional Resources
Report by Dr. Philip Currie and Dr. Mark Norell
Report by Dr. Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav
Report by Dr. Bolor Minjin
Live Science coverage

Photo Caption
(L to R) Professor Philip Currie, PhD (President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology), Attorney Robert Painter, and Puntsag Tsagaan (Senior Advisor to the President of Mongolia) at the dinosaur inspection site.

News source :http://www.painterfirm.com/

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“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C

“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C


Two of the world’s greatest scholars of Mongol history joined theircollaborators NG Emerging Explorer Albert Lin and NG Archaeology Fellow Fred Hiebert in Washington, D.C. last week to discuss their findings on the Valley of the Khans project, to meet with the Mongolian Ambassador to the U.S. Khasbazaryn Bekhbat, and to engage in other conversations around their exciting work.

For the past few years, Albert has been using cutting-edge technology and innovative crowd-sourcing methods to survey the vast openness of Mongolia in search of the area where Genghis Khan was buried. His collaborators have been uncovering the history of the Mongol leader quite a bit longer.

Professors Shagdaryn Bira and Tsogt-Ichiryn Ishdorj are internationally recognized as leaders in Mongol historical research, based on the decades of intense research they have done on the subject, helping to flesh out the story of the famous conqueror, and restoring a knowledge of the rich cultural impacts of his surprisingly modern empire–one that included free trade of goods and ideas, and freedom of religion for all.

Over the years, Bira and Ishdorj’s research has been difficult at times because of the scant clues in the written record and sensitive politics surrounding the legacy of Genghis Khan.

Professor Bira is now Secretary General of the International Association for Mongol Studies, and laureate of the state prize of Mongolia for his scholarly work on the history of the country. In particular, he has won international acclaim for his multifaceted research, including papers comparing modern and Mongol-era versions of globalization and warfare in the Middle East.

Professor Ishdorj is Deputy Director of the International Association for Mongol Studies, as well as Co-Principal Investigator and Mongolian Expedition Leader on the Valley of the Khans project. Together these scholars bring an incredible amount of historic information, cultural perspective, experience, and personal passion to the project.

2012 marks 850 years since the birth of Temujin, the Mongolian man who would unite his neighbors and conquer the known world under the title of Genghis Khan. After decades of research, years of hi-tech data gathering, and months of archaeological analysis, one more chapter in the long history of this man and his legacy is nearing completion. Stay tuned to discover what secret whispers may yet rise from the silent steppes.

Source :http://exploration.nationalgeographic.com/mongolia/content/%E2%80%9Cvalley-khans%E2%80%9D-experts-meet-dc

‘I am Mongolian’ International Childrens Day Event NYC

‘I am Mongolian’ International Childrens Day Event NYC


Mongol Heritage Foundation  pleased to present. “I am Mongolian “International Children’s Day Event.

The event will be held on Saturday June 2nd, 2012 from 12:00 am 3:00 pm. The event will be held at Mongol Heritage Foundation located at 135-53 NORTHERN BLVD SUITE 202, Flushing, NY. 11354

I am Mongolian “Event will be filled with learning about Mongolia, art activities, gifts, film, and many more surprises.

Program

  • NYC area Mongolian children’s networking
  • My knowledge about Mongolia  children’s joint art  activities organized by NYC area Mongolian Parents
  • “Let’s Travel Mongolia” interactive teaching by Ethnographer , Historian   Byambakhuu Darinchuluun
  • Horse Racing Children Documentary film (Namuun Zet Production)
  • International Children’s Day Gift

Sponsored by: Mongol American Cultural Association

Presented by: Ethnographer, History teacher   Byambakhuu Darinchuluun

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun graduated from National State University of Mongolia in 2003

During year 2006-2009 he taught Mongolian Culture class at the Mongolian School of the National Capital Area (MSNCA).

Since Mongol Heritage Foundation established he started teaching Mongolian Language, History, Culture class.

Register your attendance. Seats are Limited.

If you have any questions, please call 202-718-4638

Mongolia’s Dilemma: Who Gets The Water?

Mongolia’s Dilemma: Who Gets The Water?


by

May 22, 2012

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation’s distinctive, nomadic identity.

Second of four parts

The Central Asian nation of Mongolia has untold riches in copper, coal and gold, which could help many of its nearly 3 million people — more than one-third of whom live in poverty.

But mining is also reshaping Mongolia’s landscape and nomadic culture. Camel and goat herders worry that new mega-mines will siphon off precious water in an area that’s already suffering from the effects of climate change.

Mijiddorj Ayur, whose livestock graze near the Oyu Tolgoi mine, tends camels in a stretch of Mongolia’s South Gobi province that’s a moonscape of sand and gravel. He relies on the animals for meat, wool and milk, and they rely on hand-pumped well water to survive.

“When we come to the well, we can see the level of the well water is 8 inches lower than it used to be,” says Mijiddorj, 76, who wears a golden, double-breasted robe called a deel and a brimmed felt hat.

Mijiddorj — Mongolians typically go by one name — says the well water has dropped in the last several years because of lower rainfall, while the grasslands are shrinking because of rising temperatures from climate change.

Now, he sees another potential threat: Oyu Tolgoi, a giant mine that will need huge amounts of water to process copper ore. The company has already drilled test wells near where Mijiddorj’s camels drink.

“My greatest fear is we won’t have water,” he says. “I don’t care about the gold or the copper, I’m just afraid there won’t be water.”

My greatest fear is we won’t have water. I don’t care about the gold or the copper, I’m just afraid there won’t be water.

– Mijiddorj Ayur, whose livestock graze near Oyu Tolgoi mine

Threats To Traditional Herding

It’s a worry echoing across South Gobi province, a mix of rocky desert and grassland where drought periodically wipes out herds. It’s home to thousands of herders and about a million head of livestock.

Officials from Oyu Tolgoi, which has been under construction since mid-2010, say the mine will draw water from a deep aquifer that won’t affect wells like Mijiddorj’s. But he and other herders are suspicious.

They have already felt mining’s impact. Herders say mine trucks hit their animals and kick up dust that chokes pastureland. Indeed, almost all the roads in the area are dirt, and trucks trail plumes of dust so huge they look like they’re on fire.

A herder named Chuluunbaatar says he’s lost about 40 percent of the pastureland he uses, as well as many sheep, goats and camels, since Oyu Tolgoi built a nearby road a year and a half ago.

Herder Mijiddorj Ayur, 76, stands outside his home in South Gobi, Mongolia. He worries about the effects a local mine will have on his livelihood.

EnlargeJohn W. Poole/NPRHerder Mijiddorj Ayur, 76, stands outside his home in South Gobi, Mongolia. He worries about the effects a local mine will have on his livelihood.

“Some of them died, because they were exhausted because there was not enough pasture,” he says. He adds that he had to kill some dying animals and sell their meat in order to salvage some of their value.

A Question Of Compensation

Oyu Tolgoi — which means “Turquoise Hill” in Mongolian, a name that refers to the color copper turns when it’s exposed to oxygen — is owned by global mining giant Rio Tinto and Canada’s Ivanhoe Mines, as well as the Mongolian government.

The mine has offered herders compensation, including simple jobs helping livestock cross roads, in a country where per capita GDP is about $2,500, according to the Mongolia government.

Many herders have signed compensation agreements, but Myagmardorj Mijiddorj, a local government official, says some herders already working for the company complain of coercion.

“Oyu Tolgoi employs people for maybe $230 a month,” says Myagmardorj. “When the people are reluctant to sign the contract, they say: ‘You are an employee and you have to sign it or there will be measures.'”

The biggest risk we face is that we will be seen to be a land of plenty in a sea of stress.

– Mark Newby, Oyu Tolgoi water adviser

In other words, Myagmardorj says, they’ll be out of a job.

“We never forced them to sign the agreement,” says Suugie Gonchigjantsan, who manages community relations for Oyu Tolgoi.

She denies that the company has pressured anyone and says the complaints are just a negotiating tactic.

“Some of the individuals really want to get more, more and more,” Suugie says.

The company’s compensation scheme is modest. One option, for instance, would provide an affected family with a $3,800 scholarship to put a child through college. In its first full year of operation, Oyu Tolgoi could produce about $900 million worth of gold and copper, according to company statistics.

So, why not give herders more money and quiet them down?

Suugie rules that option out. Any solution, she says, “has to be equal.”

Map of Mongolia's Oyu Tolgoi Mine

Credit: Nelson Hsu/NPR

Growing Competition For Water

Mark Newby, Oyu Tolgoi’s principal adviser for water resources, says the company has monitored more than 100 herder wells in the area for years.

He says Oyu Tolgoi has found no connection between the herder wells, which go down as far as 30 feet, and the aquifer the mine will draw from, which begins about 150 feet below the surface.

At full capacity, the mine will pump about 180 gallons per second from the aquifer. If herders’ wells are affected — which Newby says he seriously doubts — Oyu Tolgoi says it will fix the problem.

“In the very worst case, it would require the delivery of treated water to the herder,” he says. “For a typical herd, that would require up to a truckload a day.”

Newby says a bigger challenge may be managing perceptions and helping herders already struggling for water.

“The biggest risk we face is that we will be seen to be a land of plenty in a sea of stress,” he says.

John W. Poole/NPR

Once a wetland — one of the very few in the Gobi — this area has been drying up over the past several years, thanks to rising temperatures and lower rainfall.

Competition for water continues to grow across South Gobi province, which is about the size of Wisconsin. Outside the provincial capital of Dalanzadgad, local officials are at odds with Mongolia’s central government and a nearby coal mine.

Two years ago, local officials designated a nearby seasonal lake as a protected area. Last year, the central government reversed the decision and said the coal mine could pump out water underneath the lake.

“That is the only fresh water source of this whole area,” says Munkhjargal Batdorj, a local official. Munkhjargal says the central government has a stake in the mine — which like Oyu Tolgoi also has foreign ownership — and appears to be pursuing its own interests.

“The government is probably reversing its own decision because it’s just not caring about the people,” she says. “I think it’s a rotten decision.”

Who Benefits The Most?

Mining contributes heavily to both local and central government budgets, and residents complain that officials sometimes use the money to enrich themselves.

Rashboud Tumen, a grocer in Dalanzadgad, cites one local representative in particular.

He says the official had a Russian jeep and traded it in for a Toyota Land Cruiser 80. Then, a few months later, he traded that in for a Land Cruiser 105 — which an incredulous Rashboud notes costs $53,000.

More than 30 percent of Mongolians live on $1.25 a day.

“Animals die in the drought,” he says. “You could have bought livestock for 10 families. You could have done so much good with that $53,000. What does a Land Cruiser 105 do for local people? Nothing.”

As mines begin to pump more water from the Gobi, herders will be watching their wells and waiting. And as profits continue to pour into mineral companies, some Mongolians will continue to wonder what is in it for them.

http://www.npr.org/2012/05/22/152698675/mongolias-dilemma-who-gets-the-water

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent


Workshop on Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhist Culture

The three-day Buddhism Retreat for university students of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent will be held at the Garrison Institute,Garrison,NY from July 5 to 7, 2012.   The Garrison Institute is housed in a beautifully renovated 77,000 square foot former Capuchin monastery with comfortable accommodations and wonderful meeting facilities. Located one hour north of New York City on the banks of the Hudson River, surrounded by forest and fields, it offers a unique, authentic setting for ideal retreats.

The retreat is hosted by Office of Tibet, NY and the Institute of Tibetan Classics, Montreal and it is being presented by the Dalai Lama Trust. It is supported by the Camellia Foundation.

The resource persons for the retreat include Geshe Thupten Jinpa, principal English translator to His Holiness the Dalai Lama; Gelek Rinpoche, a Tibetan spiritual master and founder of Jewel Heart Centers headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan; Geshe Damdul Namgyal, a former Religious Assistant to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and currently associated with the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative of the Emory University, Alanta; Lama Pema Wangdak, a founder of the Vikramasila Foundation and the Palden Sakya Centers; and several others.

The retreat is open to students that are about to enter, currently enrolled or recently graduated from college/university.

Surrounding view from the Garrison Institute

The retreat is free, but the participants have to bear their own travel expenses. The host organizations will meet the expenses of the participants’ board and accommodation at the Garrison Institute. The participants are expected to check in at the Garrison Institute on the evening of July 4 and check-out from the institute after the retreat on July 8.

A total of 100 participants will be accepted on first come, first serve basis. Those interested to participate in the retreat should send the following information to sign up for the retreat to Tsewang Phuntso at phuntso@igc.org

A detail curriculum of the retreat will be circulated shortly.

Registration Information
Name
Address
College/University
Major/Focus of study
Email address (personal and not university address)
Phone:
Please specify in the email if you are recent graduate

http://tibetoffice.org/media-press/events/2012-buddhism-retreat-for-tibetan-university-students-registration-call

Mongolian American Student Associaton

Mongolian American Student Associaton


Mission

Our mission is to facilitate and foster Mongolian American students to achieve their educational and professional career goals, while strengthening and sustaining better communities.

Description
Education is the ultimate key to success. There are many Mongolian Americans who miss the opportunity to get higher education due to lack of information. Many think they can’t juggle their time well between work and school. Some think they can’t attend college because they are undocumented or they can’t afford it. Some may not even see a well advantage from attending a college. Thus, Mongolian American Cultural Association  will help you  provide information and encourage students to achieve their educational and career goals.
Mongolian American Student Survey
Questions :
Are you Mongolian currently living in the United States ?
  • Yes
  • No
Are you currently enrolled in school ?
  • Yes
  • No
What is the highest level of education your father has completed?
  • High School
  • Some College
  • Bachelor
  • Masters
  • PhD
  •  Unknown
What is the highest level of education your mother has completed?
  •  High School
  •  Some College
  •  Bachelor
  •  Masters
  •  PhD
  •   Unknown
 Is your immediate family currently living in the United States?
  •  Yes
  •  No
 What was the main reason you/your family decided to move to the United States?
  •  Education
  •  Financial
  •   Other
 Would you be interested in joining a not for profit Mongolian American student organization?

  •  Yes
  •   No

What the main reason you are interested in joining a Mongolian American student organization?

…………………………………………

What activities/events would most attract you to attend an event?

  •  Social events
  •  Educational events
  •  Networking events
  •   Others:

What is the best means to reach you with information regarding activities/events? (check all that apply):

  • E-mail
  • Word of mouth
  • Facebook
  •  Text message
  •  Twitter
  •  Other (please specify):

Where do you see yourself in the following years?

Attending school Working in Mongolia Working in USA
5 years Where do you see yourself in the following years? 5 years Attending school 5 years Working in Mongolia 5 years Working in USA
10 years Where do you see yourself in the following years? 10 years Attending school 10 years Working in Mongolia 10 years Working in USA
20 years Where do you see yourself in the following years? 20 years Attending school 20 years Working in Mongolia 20 years Working in USA

Do you feel adequately prepared to get a job?

  •  Yes
  •  Somewhat
  •  Not really
  •  No

What do you think is your biggest career challenge?

……………………………………..
In your opinion how important is it to have career guidance and access to careers services like Career finder tests, interview coaching, CV clinics, etc. at this stage?
  •  Very important
  •  Important
  •  Somewhat important
  •  Not important

Indicate age:

  •  Under 16
  •  16-18
  •  19-21
  •   22-25
  •   26-30
  •   30+
 Indicate gender:
  •  Male
  •  Female
 Where were you born?
  •  Mongolia
  •  USA
  •  Other:
At what age did you come to the states?

………………………
How long have you been living in the United States? (in years)

……………………….
Which state do you live in?
  1. Alabama
  2. Alaska
  3. Arizona
  4.  Arkansas
  5.  California
  6.  Colorado
  7.  Connecticut
  8.  Delaware
  9.  Florida
  10. Georgia
  11. Hawaii
  12.  Idaho
  13.  Illinois
  14. Indiana
  15. Iowa
  16. Kansas
  17. Kentucky
  18. Louisiana
  19. Maine
  20.  Maryland
  21. Massachusetts
  22.  Michigan
  23.  Minnesota
  24.  Mississippi
  25. Missouri
  26. Montana
  27.  Nebraska
  28. Nevada
  29. New Hampshire
  30. New Jersey
  31.  New Mexico
  32. New York
  33. North Carolina
  34. North Dakota
  35. Ohio
  36. Oklahoma
  37.  Oregon
  38.  Pennsylvania
  39. Rhode Island
  40. South Carolina
  41. South Dakota
  42.  Tennessee
  43.  Texas
  44.  Utah
  45.  Vermont
  46. Virginia
  47. Washington
  48. West Virginia
  49. Wisconsin
  50.  Wyoming
What is your household income in U.S. dollars?
  •  Below $40,000
  •  $40,000-$60,000
  •  $60,000-$80,000
  •  $80,000 +
What is your current residency status in the United States?
  •   Citizen
  •   Green Card Holder
  •    F-1 Student Visa
  •    Undocumented
  •    Other Visa. Please specify
What is your living condition?
  •  I live alone
  •  I live with roommates
  •  I live with relatives/family
  •   Other:
Would you like to be entered into a raffle for $50 Visa Gift Card? If you click yes, then you will be asked to provide contact information in case you are the winner!
  •  Yes
  •   No

Please provide your e-mail address:……………………………

Email :bganba2@uic.edu  , okushag@gmail.com ,  Masasuragch@gmail.com
Heritage Auctions: Stop the auction of illegally collected Mongolian dinosaur fossils

Heritage Auctions: Stop the auction of illegally collected Mongolian dinosaur fossils


On May 20th, 2012 Heritage Auctions will place scientifically important fossils from Central Asia, including a Tyrannosaurus (also known as Tarbosaurus) bataar skeleton (lot 49315), on the auction block. These fossils are strongly suspected by scientists from Mongolia and the United States of having been illegally collected from Mongolia. Mongolian law forbids the export and sale of fossils collected in the country. The President of Mongolia, and scientists from Mongolia and the United States have spoken out against this apparent theft of the scientific heritage of Mongolia. These priceless scientific and natural resources belong to the people of Mongolia and should be returned to their rightful owners, not sold to the highest bidder.

If Hertiage Auctions has compelling evidence that these fossils were not illegally collected from Monglia they should disclose that information immediately.

Heritage Auctions: Stop the auction of illegally collected Mongolian dinosaur fossils