Tag: United State

Mongolian American Yahoo Groups


  1. Amerikmongolchuud · “AmerikMongolchuud” Mongolian Community
  2. arlington_mongolians · Arlington area Mongolians
  3. bay_area_mongolian_soccer · Bay Area Mongolian Soccer
  4. bay_area_mongolians · The Bay Area Mongolian Community
  5. california_mongols
  6. ChicagoMongols · Chicago Mongols
  7. colo_mongols · Colorado Mongolians
  8. dctsuglaan · DC Mongol Tsuglaan
  9. florida_mongolians
  10. HamagMongol · Mongolian Americans
  11. LA_MONGLOBAL
  12. la_mongolchurch
  13. la_mongols
  14. mongolianyouthleaders · Mongolian Youth Leaders
  15. orloo · Welcome to Orloo Group
  16. sac_mongolians · sacramento_mongolians
  17. sfbaymongols
  18. us_mongols · US Mongols
  19. wastate_mongolians · WA State dahi Mongolchuud
  20. mongoliadc
  21. New_York_Mongolians
  22. temtsel · Bainuu US Mongolian Community
  23. huhtenger  Bay Area Mongolians
  24. mongol_toronto
  25. mgl_immanuel · “Immanuel” San Francisco Mongolian Christian church
  26. Canada_Mongol · Canadian Mongolian
  27. albertamongols · Alberta Mongols
  28. AmericanMongols · American Mongolian Academy 
  29. mongolian_frontiers · American Mongolian Frontiers
  30. themongolianschool
  31. mongoliancommunity · Mongolian Community  Center Los Angeles
  32. MongolSurguuli · Mongol Surguuli
  33. mongolcc · Mongolian Cultural Center
  34. m_americans · Mongolian Americans’s Group
  35. helpj1students · Support Mongolian J-1 students
  36. mongoltoronto · Mongolian Community of Ontario
  37. sac_mgl_students · Mongolian Students Club in Sacramento
  38. fulbright_mongolia_2011 · Mongolian Fulbright group 2011 

 

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Kalmyk Day , New Jersey


KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

 

Soccer Game at Oak Glen Park Begins @ 9:00am
Teams: Mongolian, Tibetan & Kalmyks

Then Kalmyk Cultural Day Begins @ 2:00pm
Performances by:

  • Kalmyk Adult Dancers, Singers
  • Kalmyk Kids’ Singers, Dombar players
  • Kalmyk Rock Band
  • Ethnic Food Tastings
  • Cash Bar – Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Shaslik

Smithsonian Institute will be present along with Local Press coverage

KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

Mongol American Facebook Page


Mongol American is inviting you to visit Facebook Page to build a closer relationship with your Mongol American Friends and their organizations.  Support Local Mongol American Business or find nearest Mongol Events Activity to join.

  1. Mongol Heritage Foundation
  2.  MongolEvents
  3. Mongolian Community of Los Angeles Metropolitan Area
  4. Mongolian Community of Denver Colorado Area
  5. Mongolian Community of  Washington DC Area
  6. Mongolian Community of San Francisco Bay Area
  7. Mongolian Community  of Seattle Metropolitan Area
  8. Mongolian Community Association of Colorado
  9. Mongolian American Chamber of Commerce
  10. Mongolian Community Association of Wisconsin
  11. Mongolian Community Association of Texas
  12. Sacramento Mongolian Community Association (MCA) Sacramento
  13. New York Area Mongolians
  14. Southern Mongolian Human Rights
  15. Mongolian Students Club at City College of San Francisco
  16. Alliance of Mongolians in USA
  17. San Francisco State University Mongolians
  18. Orloo
  19. Chicago Mongolian School
  20. Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center
  21. Illinois State Mongolian Non Profit Organizations United Council
  22. Chicago 1st Ward Mongolians
  23. Mongolian Soccer League in Washington DC
  24. Washington DC Area Mongolians
  25. Mongol American Cultural Association
  26. Mongolian Cultural Center
  27. Mongolian School of Colorado
  28. UB Nails
  29. Altan Bumbug Club
  30. Mongolian Women’s Development Foundation
  31. US-Mongolia tennis club
  32. Mongolian American Student Association
  33. Air Bridge LLC
  34. City of Ulaanbaatar Park, Denver Colorado
  35. Tulga Club
  36. SF Bay Mongolians
  37. TulgaT
  38. Mongolians in Seattle
  39. Blue Sky Education Project
  40. Toronto Mongolians
  41. The Mongol Children’s Festival and Competition in USA
  42. American Mongolian Association 
  43. Mongol Rally Team America 
  44. SFSU Mongolians
  45. Mongolian American Chamber of Commerce
  46. Mongolian in America book
  47. Ella Ekko
  48. SweetYmotion
  49. Amirdash
  50. Aka Odko
  51. Nominjin
  52. Mongolian American Football Association 
  53. Mongolian American Basketball Association
  54. Mongolian American Children’s Foundation
  55. Miss Mongolia USA
  56. US Mongolia Tennis Club
  57. Association of Mongolian Students In America
  58. Sterling Ballet Academy
  59. Seattle Mongol Church
  60. MG Logistics LLC
  61. Mashbat Brothers/Films

Mongol American Facebook Page  

Mongol American Facebook Groups


 

Mongol American Presenting Facebook Groups.

Are you eager to looking for Mongol Americans on Facebook Groups ?

We are recommending to you  recent and most active Facebook Groups .

  1. NYC Mongol
  2. Mongolian Student Association-Los Angeles
  3. Mongolians in Boston
  4. Cool Mongolians Chi-Town only Chicago
  5. Chicago Bulls Mongolian Fans
  6. Bay Area Mongolians Zar
  7. Mongolian American Student Association (MASA)
  8. Chicago Mongolian Football
  9. Bay Area Mongolian Com
  10. The Mongolian School of the National Capitol Area
  11. NYC MGL
  12. Cool Mongolians in Los Angeles
  13. Mongolians in Saskatoon  Canada
  14. Hazara Mongolian Global Initiative
  15. Young Mongolian Professionals Association in America ,NGO
  16. Mongolian Students Non Profit  Organization in America (MSNOA)
  17. DMV Mongolians
  18. Hazara Association of Canada
  19. Kalmyk American Association
  20. Kalmyk Brotherhood Society
  21. Buryats in America
  22. NYC & New Jersey Kalmyks
  23. Гадаадад суугаа монголчууд (Mongolians who lives in Overseas)
  24. American Youth Leadership Program with Mongolian
  25. American Mongolian Basketball
  26. Canadian Alumni of Mongolia
  27. PC- Mongolia DC
  28. Mongolian American Women’s Association
  29. Mongolians in Boston (the new better version)

 

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab


Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab (1883–1964) was supposedly the last Mongolian Khutugtu, a Lamaist dignitary believed to be an incarnation of Buddha, politician and Mongolian-American scholar. Jamsrangjab was a Khalkha Mongolian and considered the living Buddha among the Mongols. He had strong friendly ties with Dalai Lama and Chiang Kai-shek. Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, respected Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab as his mentor and teacher during his visit to the monastery he founded in New Jersey, USA.

When Jamsrangjab was born to commoners, Bashlu and Gimbeles, in Zagdsambar of Zasagt Khan (in modern Zavkhan Province), there spread mysterious but amazing tales about his born. At his age of 5, Bogd Khan declared Jamsrangjab to be the after-life of the late Diluwa. Jamsrangjab with his parents moved to the capital city Nyislel Khuryee. He studied the philosophy of Buddhism so hard that he was awarded religious dignities at the age of 7 and 21.

In 1916 the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to the south-eastern frontier of Bogd Khaanate Mongolia with the Mongolian general, Khatanbaatar Magsarjav to ease the conflict between the Mongols and the Republic of China. Sometime around C. 1919, he attempted to visit Russia to ask help against the growing influence of China, but he was stopped at the borderline due to incomplete identity documents. Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was also seeking to ask assistance from the United States of America to support the independence of Mongolia.

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was arrested in 1930 due to the accusation that he was linked with the so-called anti-communist leader, Eregdendagva. He was freed later after he didn’t accept the trial. On 26 February 1931, the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to China by the government of Mongolian People’s Republic to spy on Banchin Bogd of Inner Mongolia, the Kuomintang, and Japanese spies operating in Inner Mongolia. After he had gone, false rumours about him spread among people. At the time, he didn’t know he would never come back to his homeland again.

While he stayed in Tibet for 3 years, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was a tutor for the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso.

On 28 June 1932, he met Banchin Bogd and attended the conference about the Khalkha Mongolia in Nanjing. While residing in Inner Mongolia, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab established contacts with prince Demchugdongrub of the western Sunid (a Mongol tribe) and his fellow Japanese. The political and military leader of China, Chiang Kai-shek, admired his skills after the two had made good friends in a companion. His safety was in danger in Mongolia when his Mongolian colleagues were purged and executed in outer Mongolia in 1937-39. He fled Mongolia when the leftists attacked on the Buddhist Clergy in 1930s.Since everybody who knew his real mission in China all disappeared or executed, the Diluwa Khutugtu was called falsely political refugee and anti-communist.

After he came to the USA in 1949 with the assistance of Owen Lattimore and fellow professors, Jamsranjab worked at the Johns Hopkins University. There he joined American-British professor Owen Lattimore‘s the Mongolia Project.In New Jersey, he founded a Monastery with Kalmyk American lamas in 1950-1952. He was elected the chief lama of the Monastery there. When he was in the USA, he still worked for the international recognition of Mongolian independence.

He influenced Chan Kai Shek to declare “Mongolia can be a member of the United Nations like other independent nations” in 1960.On 7 April 1965, the last Mongolian Khutugtu, Jamsrangjab, died at the age of 82 in New York. In 1990, the supreme court of Mongolia proved his innocence and abolished all decrees that accused him of false political crimes.

Source : Wikipedia

Source : Mongol American Cultural Association

Source : Dilowa Khutugtu Memorial Foundation

Farewell, MONGOLIA


As my posting in Mongolia draws to a close, I want to publicly thank Mongolians living across the country – from Dornod to Bayan Ulgii – for their interest, hospitality and support.

I will remember many things about Mongolia.  But, perhaps more than anything, I will remember the vastness of the steppe; the beauty of the mountains; the brilliance of the night stars; and the personal kindnesses extended by so many Mongolians at every step of the way.  A sense for the fascinating history and unique culture of this great country will also linger, long after my formal assignment in Mongolia concludes.

In fact, it has been my privilege to live and work in Mongolia twice – first as USAID country director (2001-2004) and now as Ambassador (2009-2012).  On each occasion, I was able to visit all 21 of Mongolia’s provinces.

My wife Fiona shares my deep appreciation for Mongolia and our three children Iain, Cameron and Catriona have spent much of their early childhoods in this country, carrying with them memories that will last a lifetime.  As a family, we have slept in gers and camped beside lakes and rivers in every corner of this spacious and beautiful land.  We have also learned from the many Mongolians we have met, at times sharing in their customs, celebrations and rich traditions.

Earlier this month, we had the unforgettable opportunity to welcome Secretary of State Clinton to Mongolia, a historic visit in which she met with President Elbegdorj, Prime Minister Batbold and Foreign Minister Zandanshatar and also addressed the Executive Meeting of the Community of Democracies as well as the International Women’s Leadership Forum.

Looking back over the entire span of three years, I am especially gratified by the many concrete ways in which the ties between the United States and Mongolia have become both deeper and stronger:

— In 2009, the US Embassy sponsored three Fulbright scholarships for higher education in the United States; for 2011, the figure reached sixteen, including ten scholars funded by the Government of Mongolia.  At this point, at least 1,200 and perhaps as many as 2,500 Mongolians are studying in the United States.

— Recently, the first Mongolian was admitted to the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point.  Over the past few years, many more Mongolians have received private scholarships to attend leading American universities including Harvard, Stanford and Yale.

— In 2009, US exports to Mongolia barely reached $40 million; for 2011, the figure surpassed $313 million.  Over the past three years, General Electric opened an office in Ulaanbaatar; Bloomberg Television established a presence in Mongolia; Wagner-Asia launched branch offices in Darkhan and Khan Bogd; and Mongolia signaled its intent to move its national airline MIAT toward an all-Boeing fleet.  Major American companies such as Peabody are now poised to make a highly positive mark, joining with Mongolian partners to bring high safety standards, the latest technology and a long-term commitment to developing Mongolia’s mineral sector in a way that is ethical and reflects concern for the environment.

— In April 2010, our Embassy received the first ever “Green Embassy of the Year Award” from the US Department of State, in recognition of our attention to environmental concerns.

— In June 2010, Mongolia was one of the first four countries world-wide to receive a large grant under the Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation, sponsored by the US Department of State — $585,000 to help preserve and protect Amarbayasgalant Monastery, located in a beautiful valley in Selenge aimag, five hours north of Ulaanbaatar.

— In June 2010, the Los Angeles based band Ozomatli visited Mongolia, attracting some 20,000 Mongolians to hear their music in Sukhbaatar Square.  To this day, the Ozomatli concert remains the single largest cultural event that the United States Embassy has ever sponsored in Mongolia.

— In November 2010, we welcomed into our home a group of disabled Mongolians representing the Mongolian NGO Wind Bird, returning from a memorable trip to discuss disability issues in the United States.  Throughout my tenure, Fiona and I have sought to ensure the involvement of disabled Mongolians across the full range of Embassy-sponsored programs in Mongolia.

— In March 2011, it was my privilege to travel to Kabul to spend several days with the Mongolian soldiers serving there.  The emergence of Mongolia as a “peacekeeping nation” is a remarkable development, most recently resulting in the deployment of the first of what will eventually be 850 Mongolian soldiers serving in the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.

— In April 2011, the Embassy launched a $25 million renovation project, symbolizing our continued and enduring commitment to partnering with Mongolia in a wide range of areas.

— In June 2011, President Elbegdorj met with President Obama in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC.  During this same visit, he also opened Mongolia’s first Consulate in San Francisco.

— In August 2011, Vice President Biden visited Mongolia – the first such visit by a sitting American Vice President in 67 years.  This visit also inaugurated our Embassy use of Facebook and Twitter.

— In January 2012, the Mongolian National Archives presented to me – which I in turn presented to our Library of Congress in Washington, DC – a facsimile copy of the travel pass given in 1862 to a “Mr. Felosi,” marking the 150th anniversary of what was very possibly the first American citizen to ever visit Mongolia.

— In June 2012, the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) in Mongolia received the MCC’s first ever “Country Commitment Award”, given in part to recognize the special attention that MCA has paid to gender concerns.

Over the past year, Americans and Mongolians have together celebrated several notable anniversaries, including the 20th anniversary of Peace Corps in Mongolia; the 20th anniversary of USAID in Mongolia; and the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between our two countries.

In celebrating that 25th anniversary of diplomatic ties, I am often reminded of a statement made many decades ago by an American diplomat named A.W. Ferrin.  Serving as a commercial officer in Peking, he argued in as early as 1918 that the United States should establish a diplomatic presence in Urga, as Ulaanbaatar was then known.  According to his message back to Washington, if the US were to open such an office, it would become “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country”.

Throughout my three-year tenure in Mongolia, I have sought every day to fulfill the promise of that early aspiration – to indeed do my best to ensure that, as a proud partner and friendly third neighbor, the United States would indeed prove to be “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country.”

Thank you once again for the many kindnesses that we have received over these last three years.  As a family, we wish the people and country of Mongolia every success in the years ahead.  We also sincerely hope that relations between the United States and Mongolia will continue to prosper.

Ambassador Jonathan Addleton

Source: http://english.news.mn/content/114436.shtml

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports


Experts agree that the rare specimen is from Mongolia

His Excellency Elbegdorj Tsakhia, President of Mongolia, appointed a delegation to inspect the Tyrannosaurus bataar dinosaur that had been the subject of a May 20, 2012 auction by Heritage Auctions in New York City. The delegation included officials from Mongolia, Canada and the United States.

The inspection took place in the New York City area, on June 5, 2012, and proceeded with the full consent and assistance of Heritage Auctions and its consignor. The paleontologists who inspected the dinosaur, at the President’s request, included:

Philip Currie, MSc, PhD, FRSC
Professor and Canada Research Chair of Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of
Alberta; and President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology

Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav, PhD
Head of Paleontological Laboratory and Museum, Mongolian Academy of Sciences

Bolor Minjin, PhD
Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs

In addition, Mark Norell, PhD, Chairman and Curator, Division of Paleontology, at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, collaborated in a report, based on his previous viewing of the dinosaur.

The paleontologists unanimously concluded that the specimen originated in Mongolia, based on unique characteristics of the Tyrannosaurus bataar. The paleontologists prepared reports, which are available for viewing via links at the bottom of this article. Dr. Currie and Dr. Norell wrote that, “The general appearance of the animal and the color of the bones indicate to us that this is the skull and skeleton of a Tarbosaurus bataar (also known as Tyrannosaurus bataar) from the Nemegt Formation of Mongolia.”

Indeed the auction catalog itself had described and publicized the specimen as a Tyrannosaurus bataar, so there has never been a dispute as to the species.

In addition to the paleontologists, the following non-scientific representatives attended the inspection:

Ann Altman, PhD
Advisor to President Elbegdorj on the Tyrannosaurus bataar issue

Baatar Choisuren
Minister/Counselor, Mongolian Embassy to the United States

Badruugan Naranzun
Director, Department of Culture and Art, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of Mongolia

Robert Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Taunya Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Puntsag Tsagaan
Senior Advisor to President Elbegdorj

Attorney Robert Painter said, “President Elbegdorj’s staff has initiated thorough research into Mongolian law concerning the preservation of cultural treasures, like this Tyrannosaurus. We have concluded that Mongolian law has not permitted export of this rare fossil out of Mongolia since at least 1961. Nonetheless, we understand that significant value was added to the specimen by the consignor through initial identification, restoration and preparation. We are also grateful for the exemplary cooperation of Heritage Auctions, the contingent buyer and the consignor, without which this inspection could have been long and needlessly delayed. All parties remain hopeful that a fair and acceptable resolution can be reached without need for additional expert opinions or litigation.”

The Mongolian delegation is now traveling back to Ulaanbaatar. Upon their return to Mongolia and reporting to President Elbegdorj, the parties will continue discussions on how to resolve this important matter.

Additional Resources
Report by Dr. Philip Currie and Dr. Mark Norell
Report by Dr. Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav
Report by Dr. Bolor Minjin
Live Science coverage

Photo Caption
(L to R) Professor Philip Currie, PhD (President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology), Attorney Robert Painter, and Puntsag Tsagaan (Senior Advisor to the President of Mongolia) at the dinosaur inspection site.

News source :http://www.painterfirm.com/