Tag: New York City

Mongolian Fest in Central Park Offers Wrestling and Genghis Khan Vodka


SourceDNAinfo.com New York

By Louie Lazar
Special to DNAinfo.com New York

3

CENTRAL PARK — In a scene that could have been straight from the grasslands of Mongolia, two pairs of wrestlers, each bare-chested except for a tight-sleeved vest around his shoulders, engaged in face-to-face battle — hands locked, arms outstretched, in a bid to take down his opponent.

But that scene on Saturday afternoon was instead taking place in a small meadow near Central Park’s Bethesda Fountain.

Nearby, on a long table filled with Mongolian fare, a few men poured vodka from a tall, gold bottle decorated with an image of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire.

“It’s good to get together and keep this tradition alive,” said Jamul Jadamba, 37, who finished second in the wrestling competition, before changing into a T-shirt that said “Yes We Khan.”

The wrestling competition was the highlight of the New York Mongolian community’s Naadam celebration, an annual festival commemorating Mongolia’s independence as well as the nation’s nomadic heritage.

About 75 people, including Od Och, the permanent representative of Mongolia to the United Nations, attended Saturday’s event, which was organized by the Mongolian Heritage Foundation of Flushing, Queens.

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun, president of the Mongol Heritage Foundation, said the goal of the event was to bring unity to the various Mongol peoples of the greater New York area and to promote Mongolian culture to the general population.

Darinchuluun said that in order to best replicate the pastoral environment of his homeland, he selected Central Park as a venue because it’s the “only place [in New York] with trees and grass.”

“It’s a very important occasion — we cannot just pass it over,” he said. “We have to celebrate.”

Naadam, also known as the “Three Games of Men” or the Nomad Olympics — the other sports being archery and horse racing — has its roots in centuries-old Mongol warrior competitions. In 2010, the festival was added to UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Each July 11 and 12 in Mongolia, thousands fill the capital city’s main stadium and welcome a procession of horsemen, athletes, soldiers, and monks during a colorful and joyous Opening Ceremony. Horse races take place across miles of open grasslands, as do hundreds of single elimination wrestling matches in which the winners are given titles such as “falcon,” “elephant,” and “lion.”

Landlocked between China and Russia, Mongolia has one of the lowest population densities of any nation on earth. But there are several hundred Mongolians living in the New York City area, according to Morris Rossabi, a professor of Mongolian History at Columbia University.

The greater New York area is also home to a sizable Kalmyk population, people of Mongol descent who are from Kalmykia, a Russian Republic on the Caspian Sea, he said.

Several of Saturday’s attendees dressed in traditional Mongolian costumes, and the top outfits were rewarded with prizes. The best wrestlers were given framed pictures of Mongolian calligraphy and were handed wads of cash.

Attached to a nearby rocky hill was the flag of Kalmykia, and at its base, a horse-headed fiddle — a long, double-stringed musical instrument that is a national symbol of Mongolia, rested against a picnic table. The Mongolian flag was staked almost precisely in the center of the meadow, and waved in the hot air.

Tsenguun Chinbat, 27, a teacher who is from Ulan Bator, the capital of Mongolia, said she attended the festivities to connect and socialize with fellow Mongolians.

“I wanted to get a feel for home,” she said.

NYC Mongol Naadam Celebration


Naadam rider 1
Naadam rider 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival.
English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

NYC Mongol Naadam

 

 

 

Please join us on Saturday July 6th for Mongol Heritage
Foundation’s Naadam Celebration.

Mongol Heritage Foundation & NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project in the NYC is holding First annual Naadam celebration in near Bethesda Fountain ,Central Park , New York. The celebration will be opened by H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations.

The NYC Mongols celebration “Naadam” 2013 will take place on Saturday July 6th from 11:00am – 7:00 pm at the west side of the “Bethesda Fountain” Central Park where the Mongol tradition of “Naadam” will happen among the all Mongol people who live in the greater New York area.

This Festivity is the one of the major celebration on the Mongols honor of the national holiday of Motherland Mongolia. During the celebration, Mongolians compete in traditional sporting events and competitions that include , wrestling, and children’s wood horse racing.
In 2010, Naadam was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

We encourage you to invite your friends and family to this exciting and interesting event where the New York Area Mongols will join together in a traditional celebration.

All of the Mongols including Buryats, Kalmyks, Hazaras ,Tuvans and Inner Mongolians are join in the celebration.

Everyone who is interested in Mongolia and Mongol Culture is invited; people who are interested in Mongolia and the Mongolian Culture such as Americans who have lived and worked in Mongolia through the Peace Corps will attend.

Where: The Bethesda Fountain, Central Park is one of the largest fountains in New York, measuring twenty-six feet high by ninety-six feet wide.It is one of the most well known fountains in the world.This neoclassical sculpture, also known as Angel of the Waters, features an eight-foot bronze angel who stands above four small cherubim representing health, purity, temperance, and peace.

Location: Bethesda Fountain, Central Park
The Mall, New York, NY 10024

When: Saturday, July 6,
Time: 11 :00 am till 7:00 pm

Opening Welcome, H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations

Greetings
Inner Mongolian Community Mr. Hasar Ayush
Kalmyk Community Ms. Kermen
Buryat Community Ms. Tsengiyev
Hazara Community Liquate Ali
Kalmyk Project NYC
Mongolian Ambulance Project
Wild Art Mongolia 2013 Expedition

The President of the Mongol Heritage Foundation Byambakhuu Darinchuluun will go over the agenda of the event

Program Highlights

Wrestling
Children’s Wood Horse Race
Children’s Shagai (ankle bone ) Game

Featuring:

Mongolian Song
Kalmyk Song
Buryat Song
Tsakhar song,
Hazara Song
Yokhor “Circle ” dancing

Contest
“I am mongol ” painting contest
The Best Traditional Mongolian male, female, and child’s clothing contest
Mongolian singing contest
Closing Ceremony Singing all Mongols .National Song (Warm Hear ted Land )

Main Organizers:
Mongol Heritage Foundation and NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project NYC,

Supporting Organizations:

Permanent Mission of Mongolia to United Nations,
Hazara Organization Progress and Equality
Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center

Sponsor:
Mongol American Cultural Association, Advanced Accounting, Sign. Inc and the NYC Inner Mongolian , Kalmyk, Hazara, Buryat, Tuva , Mongolian community

Media:
Writer, journalist , Louie Lazar
http://www.louielazar.com/

Asian Fusion Magazine , General Editor, Rick Lin
http://www.asianfusion-mag.com/

Get involved :You’ll meet new Mongol people, have fun and support a great event.

Let Mongol Culture Alive in New York City Tri-state Area

Volunteering, Partner and Sponsor Call :

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun Mongolia (347) 437-9265,
Dawood Changazi Hazara (347) 400-8591,
Kermen Dyumkeeva Kalmyk (347) 221-9123
Enkhbat Toochig Inner Mongolia (917)698-4367

Please bring food to share and your beverages to drink. There will be Mongolian food and games to play.

Boortsog, suutei tsai, byaslag and plates, napkins, silverware, etc. will be provided by the Mongol Heritage Foundation .

What to expect:
some ideas on what to expect and what you should do when you attend during Naadam Event.

Children’s Wooden Hobby Horse Rising
Although the NYC Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction.

Naadam Dress

Mongol Malgai , Mongol Deel, Khantaaz,

Wrestling
Mongolian traditional wrestling is an untimed competition in which wrestlers lose if they touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet or hand. When picking pairs, the wrestler with the greatest fame has the privilege to choose his own opponent. Wrestlers wear two-piece costumes consisting of a tight shoulder vest (zodog) and shorts (shuudag). Only men are allowed to participate.Each wrestler has an “encourager” called a zasuul. The zasuul sings a song of praise for the winning wrestler after rounds 3, 5, and 7.
Winners of the 7th or 8th stage earn the title of zaan, “elephant”. The winner of the 9th or 10th stage, is called arslan, “lion”. In the final competition, all the “zasuuls” drop in the wake of each wrestler as they take steps toward each other. Two time arslans are called the titans / giants, or avraga.

Shagai
Shagai games are especially popular during the Mongolian summer holiday of Naadam. In shagai dice, the rolled shagai generally land on one of four sides: horse, camel, sheep or goat.
Mongolians still exchange shagai today as tokens of friendship. The shagai may be kept in a little pouch.A large variety of traditional Mongolian games are played using the shagai pieces. Depending on the game, the anklebones may be tossed like dice, flicked like marbles, shot at with arrows, caught in the hands, or simply collected according to the roll of a die. In many games, the side on which a tossed piece lands (horse, sheep, camel, or goat) is significant.

Khadag
Typically it is blue to represent the beautiful blue sky. Please bring your Khadag greet with Mongols.

Mongolian Calligraphy
The Classic Mongolian script written from the top downwards and in clockwise turns and has a classic vertical direction which expresses the almost optimal movement of handwriting due to the theory of probability.

Yohor Dance
Yohor is a circle dance. Buryat Mongol peoples have some form of circle dance. Yohor is the Buryat version. The chief characteristics in this belief is the concept of the world axis, represented by a tree, by the serge, or by the oboo. As part of these customs there is the use of the circle dance for shamanist ritual and worship at these places which is called the yohor. The dance may encircle the sacred tree or object, or the shaman who is conducting a ritual. These circle dances may last for hours, and are punctuated by the phrases yohor-o or heeyo. The yohor is extremely ancient and is depicted on rock carvings thousands of years old.

NYC Mongol Library display

Mongol Library Project
Sep 2011 to Sep 2013
NYC Mongol Library is designed to provide the opportunity to explore the richness of Mongol history.
The Mongol Heritage Foundations Library provides many interesting and informative books in Mongolian, and English pertaining to Mongol history, art, geography, literature, and culture. In addition, recreational reading includes periodicals, newspapers, biographies, magazines, novels, and materials about travel.
Members can also enjoy video cassettes such as Mongol, Kalmyk , Tuvan, Hazara, Buryat, Inner Mongolian films, biographies, travel, documentaries, and life stories of Mongol Americans. We encourage members to check out books, and other materials, and reap the richness of Mongol, and Mongol-American history, events, culture, and experiences

Mongol Heritage Foundation Membership application
Mongol Heritage Foundation 2013-2014 Events Calendar

Food Tasting

Tsagaan idée -dairy products such as cheeses and hard curds

Byaslag
Cheese from milk of cattle, yaks, goats, or sheep.
Most commonly, the milk of yak and cattle is used. Goats and sheep are not milked in all places, but make for the most aromatic cheese. However, mongolian cheese doesn’t get to ripen like its european counterparts, so the overall taste is somewhat bland in comparison.

Korkhoi Aaruul
“Worm Aaruul” is a variation in the shape of little strands, often sweetened. Don’t press the fresh material, but put it through a meat grinder (available in every mongolian houshold) into small “worms”. Arrange those in little heaps for drying. This type of Aaruul is easier to chew (especially for children), but less suited for travel supplies.

Khailmag
khailmag, made from a mixture of shortening, water, flour, and sugar, pan-fried at a ridiculously high temperature until clarified oil separates at the sides of the pan. Reconstituted raisins are then added to the mix, and the result is a warm, delicious sludge that resembles a not-too-cheesy cheesecake

Suutei Tsai- The most favored drink during this holiday is Mongol milk tea .Milk tea is an indispensable part of the Mongolian’s daily life.

khuushuur
One of the Mongolian most famous delicious meals is of course the Khuushuur. It’s a meal that consist of meat, onions and other ingredients put together and wrapped with flour dough, and afterwards it’s fried in oil. Everyone loves the taste of khuushuur in Mongolia..Mongolians hold the fresh khuushuur between their palms and also with the tips of all fingers to stimulate the nerves and blood circulation in the hands. This is believed to be curative. In some occasions, a hot khuushuur is placed on the soles of the feet and other selected places to treat neurosis and health conditions related to the balance of the air element of the five elements composing the human body.

Boortsog
Boortsog Mongolian Deep Fried Cookies

After Party
There will be Naadam Party starting at 10pm;

Music
DJ Baagii Beatz is pleased to announce the music for NYC Mongols

Naadam celebration 2013. The music has a largely Mongol theme. Event organizers have put considerable thought into selecting the music, and their choices blend traditional music with some newly commissioned pieces.

Address :BOSS Lounge @ Ktown; 10 West 32nd Street 5th Floor
New York, NY 10001.

RSVP: 718.749.6006, 347.437.9265

http://www.mixcrate.com/djbaagii
https://www.facebook.com/DjBaagiiBeatz

 

 

 

Flow of N.Y.C ” State of Mind Party


flow of nyc party

Washington DC Metropolitan Area Mongolian Party 2013
Presented by: MongolEvents , DJ Baagii

Flow of N.Y.C ” State of Mind Party

NYC meets DC Party” series are starting for new season…..This is the 1st event for NYC Mongols meets DC Mongols.

Where: Bistro Bistro French restaurant & lounge (The chic new “In” spot that is catering to the all the “beautiful people” of DC)

Location: 1727 Connecticut Ave NW Washington, DC 20009
When: Saturday: 2/2/2013
Time: 10:00 pm – 3:00 am
Tickets : 15$

Featuring

DJ Baagii Beatz
“LIKE” http://www.facebook.com/DjBaagiiBeatz
TOMA 2013 DMS(Those Of My Allies Discovering My Style)

MongolEvents
“LIKE” http://www.facebook.com/pages/MongolEvents/27655454597
(Mongolian Special Events, Event Planning,Entertainment)

Music
Nothing ignites passion more than music, and New York’s club-goers are a very passionate bunch. Fueled by the world’s most renowned turntable artists, NYC’s music scene is eclectic, innovative and fluid. Here are the Big Apple’s hottest Mongol talents, making it all happen behind the decks.DJ Baagii Beatz rocks out the new format in music and plays hip-hop, rock, house, old School ,Dance, Top 40, R&B,80’s 90’s & Party Anthems,and more. Something for everyone’s musical tastes.

What to expect:

* Icebreaker games
* Professional photography
* Prizes & Giveaways all night
* I love N.Y.C themed video
* N.Y.C Signature Cocktail The Brooklyn

Ages 18+ to enter and 21 to drink
No Dress Code

TABLE RESERVATIONS: 202.718.4683 , 718.749.6006
More info:
http://www.mixcrate.com/djbaagii
http://byamba.cms2.picaholic.net/
http://mongolevent.wordpress.com/
http://mongolevents.blogspot.com/

Bio.

Currently DJ Baagii Beatz spins at several nightclubs and lounge. DJ residencies at some of the hottest nightlife spots in New York City..
Venues such as :
(Clubs)
– Arena
– Providence
– LeSouk
– Bar 13
– Griffin (with famous DJ NiNa Ski)
– Circle
– District 36
– Hiro (closing party)
– The Park NYC
– White Rabbit (with famous DJ Enferno)
– Cellar Bar (Park Hotel)
– Copia
– Greenhouse (opened the party for legendary DJ Jazzy Jeff)
– The Caulfield
– P.S 450
– Splash

(Lounges)
– Zendo Lounge
– D.I.P Aquabar Lounge (indoor pool lounge)
– Boss Lounge
– 3Ten Lounge
– 3rd Floor Cafe Lounge
– Spot Lounge
– XVI Rooftop Lounge
– 230 5th ave Rooftop Lounge
– Play Lounge
– Pop Burger Lounge
– Hudson Terrace Rooftop Lounge

(Private Parties)
– Aeropostale Clothing company private party @ MoMA
– Christmas party for NYPD @ Copia Club
– Fashion Week party @ BeBe Store
– 3 years of New Years party inclufing countdown @ Bar 13
Speed Dating event @ Soho Grand hotel
– Embrace Fashion magazine opening party @ Soho Grand Hotel
– 2013 New Year Party for Mongolian people in NYC @ Tangra Lounge
– Private Spanish community parties, Reggae Dancehall parties
– Also birthday party, reunion, sweet 16, baptism, high school dance, prom, wedding etc..

Join Flow of N.Y.C ” State of Mind Party

 

Kalmyk Day , New Jersey


KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

 

Soccer Game at Oak Glen Park Begins @ 9:00am
Teams: Mongolian, Tibetan & Kalmyks

Then Kalmyk Cultural Day Begins @ 2:00pm
Performances by:

  • Kalmyk Adult Dancers, Singers
  • Kalmyk Kids’ Singers, Dombar players
  • Kalmyk Rock Band
  • Ethnic Food Tastings
  • Cash Bar – Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Shaslik

Smithsonian Institute will be present along with Local Press coverage

KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

Mongol American Facebook Groups


 

Mongol American Presenting Facebook Groups.

Are you eager to looking for Mongol Americans on Facebook Groups ?

We are recommending to you  recent and most active Facebook Groups .

  1. NYC Mongol
  2. Mongolian Student Association-Los Angeles
  3. Mongolians in Boston
  4. Cool Mongolians Chi-Town only Chicago
  5. Chicago Bulls Mongolian Fans
  6. Bay Area Mongolians Zar
  7. Mongolian American Student Association (MASA)
  8. Chicago Mongolian Football
  9. Bay Area Mongolian Com
  10. The Mongolian School of the National Capitol Area
  11. NYC MGL
  12. Cool Mongolians in Los Angeles
  13. Mongolians in Saskatoon  Canada
  14. Hazara Mongolian Global Initiative
  15. Young Mongolian Professionals Association in America ,NGO
  16. Mongolian Students Non Profit  Organization in America (MSNOA)
  17. DMV Mongolians
  18. Hazara Association of Canada
  19. Kalmyk American Association
  20. Kalmyk Brotherhood Society
  21. Buryats in America
  22. NYC & New Jersey Kalmyks
  23. Гадаадад суугаа монголчууд (Mongolians who lives in Overseas)
  24. American Youth Leadership Program with Mongolian
  25. American Mongolian Basketball
  26. Canadian Alumni of Mongolia
  27. PC- Mongolia DC
  28. Mongolian American Women’s Association
  29. Mongolians in Boston (the new better version)

 

Surharban Buryat Picnic NYC


 

Surharban – Buryat National Festival of sport and culture. It’s held every summer where you can see national buryat singing, dances, national sports, eat buuza. Surharban means “Shooting the target”!

WhereCentral Park, Bethesda fountain

When :  Sunday, July 29th , 2012

Time : 10: 00 am

Contact :  Rigjyedma Baldanova  917-500-4242  , Marina 347-235-7266  byamba 202-718-4638

Program :

  • Opening Ceremony
  • Yokhor Dance
  • NYC Mongolian and Buryat Soccer Game

Official Closing event at  8:00 pm Harmony Terrace 47-57 41st St, Sunny side, NY 11104

Dear compatriots!

We invite you to take an active part in the equivalent Surharban! All requests, suggestions, help received with great joy!

Bring to play badminton, volleyball balls, etc., as well as blankets, drinks, food, plates, spoons and good mood! Let us together Surkharban 2012 an unforgettable event in the lives of American drill!

Organizers

  1. Dance Contest : Boris
  2. Sport : Alex Bayskhalan, Eugene
  3. Buuzy – Faith, Luda, Rygzhita

Lease for $ 20:
$ 10 – on buuz and $ 10 – on the lottery. Will be played ipad.

$ 10 to take buuz call : 917-500-4242

The event will be held in the form of a picnic.

 

Mongols United Party NYC


NYC Mongols Presents

“Mongols United Party”

New york City Area Mongolian, Buryat, Kalmyk , Hazara , Southern Mongolians, RPCV-Mongolia , American friends then others .

When :July 29th , 2012

Where : Harmony Terrace 47-57 41st St, Sunny side, NY 11104

Time : 8:00 pm to 2:00 am

Tax : 15$

Program :

Who, Why , ……….Damn Mongols
Beginning with Facebook Match for Single’s Marathon
Dance Competition
Surprise

Call reservation 202-718-4638

NYC Mongol “Naadam” Picnic


NYC Mongol   Naadam Picnic taking place in a Lighthouse park.

 

Where: Light House Park , Roosevelt Island , NY

When: Sunday, July 8th

Time:  10 :00 am

Contact: Lutaa  ,  1-347-891-9241

Special:  Taste and drink Real Mongolian Airag on the Naadam Day

Light House Park is great place to watch the sun set and Manhattan views.

We are celebrating the greatest of all ‘Mongol Naadam’ in  beautiful  Roosevelt Island.

Please bring a blanket (to sit or recline on),

We suggest you to bring home made Mongolian cuisine and beverages .  We will make BBQ ,

If you cannot bring food contribute 20$ for per person to the organizer.

Organizer will provide you food and drinks.

Have a great Naadam Festivity.

The Kalmyks: The Mongols who were left Behind


 

This film was created by Dechen Kelden, a Kalmyk Mongolian who was born and raised in Jackson, NJ. She is a current student at Sarah Lawrence College who took on this project to create an accessible film for young Kalmyks to learn about their history as an Oirat group from the Western Steppes of Mongolia. She is interested in Cultural Preservation studies and working within the Tibetan community based in New York City.
This film is currently a sample and will be expanded upon in the near future with additional interviews and a possible Russian translation.

Any questions or comments please email kalmykmovie@yahoo.com

Directed by Dechen Kelden
Produced and Edited by Tenzin Wangchuk

 

Meet the Kalmyks

Meet the Kalmyks


A tiny Jersey ethnic group traces its roots to Mongolia and Genghis Khan.

Route 9 and Freehold suggest Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” and the lyrics, “Sprung from cages on Highway 9” and “Baby, this town rips the bones from your back.” They don’t conjure up the quietude of the three Buddhist temples and the Mongolian people known as the Kalmyks I encountered recently just off Route 9 and just south of Freehold.

Never heard of the Kalmyks? Neither had I, until I learned that this group of approximately 3,000 people—mostly New Jerseyans centered in Howell Township—is celebrating its 60th anniversary as Americans in 2011. New Jersey must indeed be the nation’s most ethnically diverse state if we have ethnic groups most of us have never even heard of. This year’s New Jersey Folk Festival, which often focuses on one of the state’s ethnic groups—its music, dance, and folklore—is featuring the Kalmyks on April 30 at an all-day event on the Douglass Campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick.

The Kalmyks’ native land, Kalmykia, is one of the republics of the former USSR that remains within the Russian Federation today, with a population of about 350,000. It is the only predominantly Mongol and Buddhist land in Europe. Many Kalmyks, siding with the Whites against the Reds, fled the Soviet Union during the Bolshevik Revolution, and the remaining Kalmyks were deported to Siberia during World War II because of alleged anti-Soviet sympathies. It was not until 1951 that Kalmyks began to come to New Jersey. Earlier, they had been rejected under the Asian Exclusion Acts (repealed in 1943) and immigration quotas based on race (repealed in 1965). They found an ally in the United States Attorney General who argued that since Kalmykia is in European Russia, the Kalmyks are Europeans not Asians, going so far as to insist that they are “Caucasians”—which is silly, but so is racism.

Virtually all of the Kalmyks who began coming to New Jersey in 1951 had spent the years after World War II in displaced persons camps in Germany. They ended up there because, as the Nazis began their long retreat after the Battle of Stalingrad, some Kalmyks followed, staying just ahead of the Soviet Army.

Russian emigres living in the Howell area and the Tolstoy Foundation, which assists new immigrants, were instrumental in sponsoring the Kalmyks in New Jersey. In addition to the Kalmyk Buddhist temples there are several Russian Orthodox churches in Howell, as evidenced by their onion-shaped domes. Howell and Lakewood, farther south on Route 9, are thriving centers of Russo-American culture in New Jersey. (There also is a small Kalmyk contingent with one temple in Philadelphia.)

Originally a nomadic people, the Kalmyks were one of the innumerable tribes united by Genghis Khan in the course of conquering much of Europe and Asia in the 12th and early 13th centuries. When the Mongolian Empire faded into retreat, the Kalmyks were incorporated into Russia.

American Kalmyks speak English, of course, but may also speak Russian and Kalmyk. Anyone who has seen the Star Wars movies has heard Kalmyk spoken. It is the language of the Ewoks, those furry, cuddly bipeds living on the moon of Endor who, you may recall, were easily understood by the linguistically gifted robot, C-3PO.

It is almost as if one is on a New Jersey version of the moon of Endor when standing on Kalmuk Road (Kalmyk is spelled in a variety of ways) just short of where it becomes a dirt road leading to the Tashi Lhunpo Temple. The street may be considered the physical center of Kalmyk life in New Jersey; it inspired the title of a book in 2004, The Street—Kalmuk Road.

I find myself inside the temple’s social hall along with Maria Taunov and Augnel “Alta” Buruschkin, and also a monk serving us tea. I am told that the way to greet a monk is with a two-handed handshake, one’s forehead lowered onto the linked hands. The monk good-naturedly laughs at my clumsy greeting.

Most monks in Kalmyk temples are Tibetans. The Dalai Lama, recognized as the spiritual leader of the Kalmyks, has visited the Howell temples. Says Buruschkin, “I get up at 5 am every day and chant my prayers for two hours. This is what the Dalai Lama does, and I try to pattern myself after His Holiness.”
On arriving in their new land, most Kalmyks entered the building trades but, over the years, gravitated into electronics, professional careers and white-collar jobs. Buruschkin works for a consulting company. Taunov is a legal assistant at a New York City law firm, commuting to work and chanting her morning prayers quietly on the bus. On weekends she chants them at the altar found in most Kalmyk homes.

Taunov also teaches Buddhist principles to children at one of the temples on weekends. “There are great assimilationist pressures,” she says. “I know who I am, but I want Kalmyk children to know who they are.” Kalmyk families tend to be closer than other American families. Many households are multigenerational, and there is great deference paid to the elders as well as veneration of ancestors. “American freedom and openness are wonderful,” Taunov says, “but they make for more intermarriage and fewer children, because Kalmyk women, like other American women, don’t want to be confined to the home.”

I was introduced to Taunov and Buruschkin by Nicholas Olefer Jr., a Caucasian of Russian descent who is a convert to Buddhism and is on the New Jersey Folk Festival board. Olefer lives in Westchester County and practices and receives instruction at a Buddhist monastery in Carmel, New York. “No one cares who you are in a Buddhist environment; they care who your teacher is,” Olefer explains.

The Kalmyks believe in reincarnation—as do Hindus—but they prefer the term “rebirth.” I can’t say I really understand the difference, but I was struck by the eerie sincerity with which Buruschkin told me, “I lived during Buddha’s time, but I didn’t pay attention. Now I’m paying attention.”

Later in the day, the three took me to Rashi Gempil-Ling, another of the Buddhist temples just off Route 9. There were two buildings, a small one essentially empty except for a large prayer wheel—a round, beautifully decorated device believed to contain a million printed prayers wrapped around a central core. “We spin the wheel as a means of getting our prayers to multiply as they fly out into the world,” says Buruschkin, who has a small prayer wheel in his home.

We removed our shoes and entered the temple, where a service was going on. Everyone sat on the floor on pillows. One was handed to me, and I did my best to resurrect an earlier familiarity with the lotus position, only to develop a cramp in my left leg. The service was presided over by Art Engle, a Caucasian lay-teacher married to a Kalmyk woman. Engle has a PhD. in Buddhist studies from the University of Wisconsin. The service was conducted in Tibetan, and Engle swayed side to side as he chanted, as did many of those in attendance, including a Buddhist nun. I was struck by the fact that half the people at the service were non-Asian.

It was peaceful in the temple. I didn’t relish the prospect of facing the traffic for the drive home. The temple was only feet from Springsteen’s Route 9 and the suggestion, as in “Born to Run,” that one should flee the rapid pulse of New Jersey life. But in that temple, if only for a short while, I found an oasis of calm.

Contributing writer Michael Aaron Rockland’s two most recent books are Stones, a novel, and The George Washington Bridge: Poetry in Steel. A forthcoming memoir will cover the years he spent in Spain as a cultural attaché.

Source:http://njmonthly.com/articles/lifestyle/people/meet-the-kalmyks.html

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports

Paleontology experts examine the Tyrannosaurus bataar and issue reports


Experts agree that the rare specimen is from Mongolia

His Excellency Elbegdorj Tsakhia, President of Mongolia, appointed a delegation to inspect the Tyrannosaurus bataar dinosaur that had been the subject of a May 20, 2012 auction by Heritage Auctions in New York City. The delegation included officials from Mongolia, Canada and the United States.

The inspection took place in the New York City area, on June 5, 2012, and proceeded with the full consent and assistance of Heritage Auctions and its consignor. The paleontologists who inspected the dinosaur, at the President’s request, included:

Philip Currie, MSc, PhD, FRSC
Professor and Canada Research Chair of Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of
Alberta; and President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology

Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav, PhD
Head of Paleontological Laboratory and Museum, Mongolian Academy of Sciences

Bolor Minjin, PhD
Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs

In addition, Mark Norell, PhD, Chairman and Curator, Division of Paleontology, at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, collaborated in a report, based on his previous viewing of the dinosaur.

The paleontologists unanimously concluded that the specimen originated in Mongolia, based on unique characteristics of the Tyrannosaurus bataar. The paleontologists prepared reports, which are available for viewing via links at the bottom of this article. Dr. Currie and Dr. Norell wrote that, “The general appearance of the animal and the color of the bones indicate to us that this is the skull and skeleton of a Tarbosaurus bataar (also known as Tyrannosaurus bataar) from the Nemegt Formation of Mongolia.”

Indeed the auction catalog itself had described and publicized the specimen as a Tyrannosaurus bataar, so there has never been a dispute as to the species.

In addition to the paleontologists, the following non-scientific representatives attended the inspection:

Ann Altman, PhD
Advisor to President Elbegdorj on the Tyrannosaurus bataar issue

Baatar Choisuren
Minister/Counselor, Mongolian Embassy to the United States

Badruugan Naranzun
Director, Department of Culture and Art, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of Mongolia

Robert Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Taunya Painter
Attorney for President Elbegdorj

Puntsag Tsagaan
Senior Advisor to President Elbegdorj

Attorney Robert Painter said, “President Elbegdorj’s staff has initiated thorough research into Mongolian law concerning the preservation of cultural treasures, like this Tyrannosaurus. We have concluded that Mongolian law has not permitted export of this rare fossil out of Mongolia since at least 1961. Nonetheless, we understand that significant value was added to the specimen by the consignor through initial identification, restoration and preparation. We are also grateful for the exemplary cooperation of Heritage Auctions, the contingent buyer and the consignor, without which this inspection could have been long and needlessly delayed. All parties remain hopeful that a fair and acceptable resolution can be reached without need for additional expert opinions or litigation.”

The Mongolian delegation is now traveling back to Ulaanbaatar. Upon their return to Mongolia and reporting to President Elbegdorj, the parties will continue discussions on how to resolve this important matter.

Additional Resources
Report by Dr. Philip Currie and Dr. Mark Norell
Report by Dr. Tsogtbaatar Khishigjav
Report by Dr. Bolor Minjin
Live Science coverage

Photo Caption
(L to R) Professor Philip Currie, PhD (President of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology), Attorney Robert Painter, and Puntsag Tsagaan (Senior Advisor to the President of Mongolia) at the dinosaur inspection site.

News source :http://www.painterfirm.com/

‘I am Mongolian’ International Childrens Day Event NYC

‘I am Mongolian’ International Childrens Day Event NYC


Mongol Heritage Foundation  pleased to present. “I am Mongolian “International Children’s Day Event.

The event will be held on Saturday June 2nd, 2012 from 12:00 am 3:00 pm. The event will be held at Mongol Heritage Foundation located at 135-53 NORTHERN BLVD SUITE 202, Flushing, NY. 11354

I am Mongolian “Event will be filled with learning about Mongolia, art activities, gifts, film, and many more surprises.

Program

  • NYC area Mongolian children’s networking
  • My knowledge about Mongolia  children’s joint art  activities organized by NYC area Mongolian Parents
  • “Let’s Travel Mongolia” interactive teaching by Ethnographer , Historian   Byambakhuu Darinchuluun
  • Horse Racing Children Documentary film (Namuun Zet Production)
  • International Children’s Day Gift

Sponsored by: Mongol American Cultural Association

Presented by: Ethnographer, History teacher   Byambakhuu Darinchuluun

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun graduated from National State University of Mongolia in 2003

During year 2006-2009 he taught Mongolian Culture class at the Mongolian School of the National Capital Area (MSNCA).

Since Mongol Heritage Foundation established he started teaching Mongolian Language, History, Culture class.

Register your attendance. Seats are Limited.

If you have any questions, please call 202-718-4638

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent


Workshop on Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhist Culture

The three-day Buddhism Retreat for university students of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent will be held at the Garrison Institute,Garrison,NY from July 5 to 7, 2012.   The Garrison Institute is housed in a beautifully renovated 77,000 square foot former Capuchin monastery with comfortable accommodations and wonderful meeting facilities. Located one hour north of New York City on the banks of the Hudson River, surrounded by forest and fields, it offers a unique, authentic setting for ideal retreats.

The retreat is hosted by Office of Tibet, NY and the Institute of Tibetan Classics, Montreal and it is being presented by the Dalai Lama Trust. It is supported by the Camellia Foundation.

The resource persons for the retreat include Geshe Thupten Jinpa, principal English translator to His Holiness the Dalai Lama; Gelek Rinpoche, a Tibetan spiritual master and founder of Jewel Heart Centers headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan; Geshe Damdul Namgyal, a former Religious Assistant to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and currently associated with the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative of the Emory University, Alanta; Lama Pema Wangdak, a founder of the Vikramasila Foundation and the Palden Sakya Centers; and several others.

The retreat is open to students that are about to enter, currently enrolled or recently graduated from college/university.

Surrounding view from the Garrison Institute

The retreat is free, but the participants have to bear their own travel expenses. The host organizations will meet the expenses of the participants’ board and accommodation at the Garrison Institute. The participants are expected to check in at the Garrison Institute on the evening of July 4 and check-out from the institute after the retreat on July 8.

A total of 100 participants will be accepted on first come, first serve basis. Those interested to participate in the retreat should send the following information to sign up for the retreat to Tsewang Phuntso at phuntso@igc.org

A detail curriculum of the retreat will be circulated shortly.

Registration Information
Name
Address
College/University
Major/Focus of study
Email address (personal and not university address)
Phone:
Please specify in the email if you are recent graduate

http://tibetoffice.org/media-press/events/2012-buddhism-retreat-for-tibetan-university-students-registration-call

Alash Ensemble Spring 2013 Tour of the USA

Alash Ensemble Spring 2013 Tour of the USA


Alash are masters of Tuvan throat singing, a remarkable technique for singing multiple pitches at the same time. Masters of traditional Tuvan instruments as well as the art of throat singing, Alash are deeply committed to traditional Tuvan music and culture. At the same time, they are fans of western music. Believing that traditional music must constantly evolve, the musicians subtly infuse their songs with western elements, creating their own unique style that is fresh and new, yet true to their Tuvan musical heritage.

When :Sat Feb 16 2013

Where:Carnegie Hall Zankel Hall, Enter on 7th Ave. bet. 57th & 58th St. 881 Seventh Avenue
New York, NY 10019
212-247-7800
Tickets go on sale August 27, 2012

Time :  10pm

If you want to receive email notification of upcoming events, send your email address, city, and state to the webmaster jbb@kovitzsystems.net. Please make sure your email is set up to allow receipt of email from jbb@kovitzsystems.net.

http://www.alashensemble.com/index.htm

Mongolian Language & Culture Classes Flushing , New York

Mongolian Language & Culture Classes Flushing , New York


You want to learn Mongolian Language ?
 
  • For personal development or to find new friendships
  • For work or business
  • To enter Further or Higher education
  • For travel
 As we begin our lessons, we will be communicating in English, however, little by little, we will be adding Mongolian words to our conversations.
Without noticing it, you will speak more and more Mongolian. In other words, you will be learning Mongolian  naturally.
Forget about learning methods where you only listen and repeat words, with my method you will speak real Mongolian.
You choose what you want to learn.
My lessons are one-to-one and entirely personalized. I prepare each lesson ONLY FOR YOU.
You have the freedom what you want to learn (basic Mongolian, business vocabulary, conversational Mongolian…) and I will create a learning program for you.
With other learning methods, every student has the same book and you learn what the teacher wants you to learn, however when studying with me, you will get customized lessons that were specifically designed to meet your needs.
I help my students develop better grammar so that they can master the Mongolian language.
If you are a tourist, just imagine the idea of knowing the basic language and the culture of the place you are visiting!
You will learn the absolutely necessary phrases and words that you may need during your tour. It does not depend on how proficient you are in Mongolian and at what stage of studying you are. You always feel prepared for the journey to Mongolia just in time.
If you are approaching an exam, you will be interested in grammar.
The confidence that comes with being prepared will reduce anxiety and give you the edge you need to succeed in school.
I suit my lessons and methods according to the kind of request I receive.
During our lessons I combine learning new vocabulary, proper sentence structure, as well as learning idioms and cliches.
The fact that I am conversationally fluent in everyday Mongolian and English gives me an advantage of a deep understanding of the relationship and differences between Mongolian and English languages.
   I can help you:
  •  Get the basics of the Mongolian language for traveling and working in Mongolian speaking countries?
  • Take your Mongolian language skills to the next level
  • Develop your business and professional Mongolian
  • Refresh the Mongolian you used to know but have forgotten
  • Improve your phonetics: accent and intonation
  • Polish up your existing Mongolian and build up your confidence in speaking it

It would be my honor to be a part of your educational future!

About  Byambakhuu Darinchuluun

I‘m a native Mongolian speaker living in Flushing, New York.

I have been teaching Mongolian Language and Culture for over 5 years.

 I am proficient in English and Mongolian.
I graduated from the National State University in Ulaanbaatar Mongolia.I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Cultural Anthropology and History.
My teaching style is very open. I let my students know what their weaknesses are and I closely work with them until they improve. I employ different techniques, depending on a student’s ability and his/her difficult areas.
 I have taught in elementary, middle and high school. Many of my students are adults. I believe that people are “never too old to learn!”
I look forward to getting to know you and helping you improve your Mongolian!
 http://mongollanguage.tumblr.com/
email: byamba_d@yahoo.com
tel:202.718.4638