Tag: Mongol

The 26th Annual Chinggis Khaan Memorial Ceremony


Genghis-Khan-WC-9308634-1-402

The Mongol-American Cultural Association

Celebrates

The 26th Annual Chinggis Khan Memorial Ceremony

Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 1:00 PM
Princeton Marriott at Forrestal Hotel, Princeton, New Jersey

PROGRAM

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun, Master of Ceremonies

1:00 PM Opening Welcome, Sanj Altan, MACA
1:10 PM Chinggis Khaan Memorial Ritual
1:45 PM His Excellency B. Altangerel, Ambassador of Mongolia to the United States
2:00 PM Mr. Ch. Munkhbayar, President, Southern Mongolian Cultural Association

Greetings

2:15 PM Mr. Akram Gizabi, Hazara Community
Mr. B. Tumenulzii, Uvur Mongol community
Ms. Tsybikova Darima, Buriat Community
Ms. Nadbitova Tamara, Kalmyk Community
Mr. Eres Salchak, Tyvan community
Mr. Tegshjargal, “Unuudur” Newspaper Journalist
3:00 PM Ms. D. Otgonjargal, Ms. A. Jegjee, Mongolian School

Auction

3:10 PM Mongolian Children’s Aid and Development Fund Auction
3:30 PM Break

Cultural Segment

4:00 PM “Magtaal” Ensemble
4:45 PM Mr. Erdeni, Ms. Sichigma and Mr. Adis
5:30 PM Mr. Amarburen, Ms. Bolormaa, Mr. Tsengelsaikhaan, …….Mongolian Dance Company & Operatic Singers

Reception

6:15 PM Reception in honor of the artists (Mongolian cuisine, cash bar)

Cultural Segment

7:15 PM Mr. Delekhei
8:00 PM Ms. Sainkho Namtschylak

After Party

8:45 PM Mongol Party by DJ Baagi Beatz
11:45 PM Close

SUGGESTED DONATIONS:

If reserved BEFORE 11/16: $30 Adults, $10 Students
If reserved ON 11/16: $30 Adults, $15 Youth (13+), $5 Children

It is better to reserve via our website BEFORE 11/16th!

Reservation.
When reviewing your donation, make sure to click on “Number of adults and children in party” to let us know how many people are in your group!

LIMITED SEATS SO RESERVE YOURS NOW!
http://www.maca-usa.org/

https://www.facebook.com/events/227146117453780/?source=1

Mongolian Fest in Central Park Offers Wrestling and Genghis Khan Vodka


SourceDNAinfo.com New York

By Louie Lazar
Special to DNAinfo.com New York

3

CENTRAL PARK — In a scene that could have been straight from the grasslands of Mongolia, two pairs of wrestlers, each bare-chested except for a tight-sleeved vest around his shoulders, engaged in face-to-face battle — hands locked, arms outstretched, in a bid to take down his opponent.

But that scene on Saturday afternoon was instead taking place in a small meadow near Central Park’s Bethesda Fountain.

Nearby, on a long table filled with Mongolian fare, a few men poured vodka from a tall, gold bottle decorated with an image of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire.

“It’s good to get together and keep this tradition alive,” said Jamul Jadamba, 37, who finished second in the wrestling competition, before changing into a T-shirt that said “Yes We Khan.”

The wrestling competition was the highlight of the New York Mongolian community’s Naadam celebration, an annual festival commemorating Mongolia’s independence as well as the nation’s nomadic heritage.

About 75 people, including Od Och, the permanent representative of Mongolia to the United Nations, attended Saturday’s event, which was organized by the Mongolian Heritage Foundation of Flushing, Queens.

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun, president of the Mongol Heritage Foundation, said the goal of the event was to bring unity to the various Mongol peoples of the greater New York area and to promote Mongolian culture to the general population.

Darinchuluun said that in order to best replicate the pastoral environment of his homeland, he selected Central Park as a venue because it’s the “only place [in New York] with trees and grass.”

“It’s a very important occasion — we cannot just pass it over,” he said. “We have to celebrate.”

Naadam, also known as the “Three Games of Men” or the Nomad Olympics — the other sports being archery and horse racing — has its roots in centuries-old Mongol warrior competitions. In 2010, the festival was added to UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Each July 11 and 12 in Mongolia, thousands fill the capital city’s main stadium and welcome a procession of horsemen, athletes, soldiers, and monks during a colorful and joyous Opening Ceremony. Horse races take place across miles of open grasslands, as do hundreds of single elimination wrestling matches in which the winners are given titles such as “falcon,” “elephant,” and “lion.”

Landlocked between China and Russia, Mongolia has one of the lowest population densities of any nation on earth. But there are several hundred Mongolians living in the New York City area, according to Morris Rossabi, a professor of Mongolian History at Columbia University.

The greater New York area is also home to a sizable Kalmyk population, people of Mongol descent who are from Kalmykia, a Russian Republic on the Caspian Sea, he said.

Several of Saturday’s attendees dressed in traditional Mongolian costumes, and the top outfits were rewarded with prizes. The best wrestlers were given framed pictures of Mongolian calligraphy and were handed wads of cash.

Attached to a nearby rocky hill was the flag of Kalmykia, and at its base, a horse-headed fiddle — a long, double-stringed musical instrument that is a national symbol of Mongolia, rested against a picnic table. The Mongolian flag was staked almost precisely in the center of the meadow, and waved in the hot air.

Tsenguun Chinbat, 27, a teacher who is from Ulan Bator, the capital of Mongolia, said she attended the festivities to connect and socialize with fellow Mongolians.

“I wanted to get a feel for home,” she said.

Mongol Naadam Vancouver, British Columbia


Naadam

Mongolian Community Association  Vancouver, British Columbia Presents

Mongol Naadam

Where :Memorial South Park, 5955 Ross Street (at E 41st Avenue), Vancouver

When : Saturday , July , 13th

Contact : Bold  778-628-6067  Dashka  778-238-6939

Program:

Opening Ceremony

Greetings Honorary Consul of Mongolia Tobi Robbins

Wrestling

Children’s activity

Food:  Khorkhog, Khuushuur

RSVP : batsukh.bold@gmail.com

 

 

Naadam 2013 Washington DC


the-nadaam-festival-dreamstime

If you can’t make it to Ulan Bator for Mongolia’s National Celebration Naadam the Mongol Naadam Festival in Washington DC is your next-best option. The event held annually in the Mongolian capital Ulan-baatar celebrates that country’s three main sporting pastimes: Mongolian wrestling, archery and cross-country horse racing. Although the Washington DC Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction;. The Mongol Naadam is not as bilingual as other festival in the area, so brush up on your conversational Mongolian and bring your appetite for khuushuur, deep-friend pockets of dough stuffed with minced mutton or beef, garlic and onions.

Program

10:00 am Soccer Game

Opening Ceremony
We will sang Mongolian national anthem with great pride of National Naadam , each person put hands clasped tightly on their heart
Mongolian Entertainment
Mongolian Wrestling
Children’s Wrestling
Children’s Horse Race

Ticket : 5$

Time: 10:00am till 5:00pm

Date: Saturday , July, 13th, 2013

Location: Occoquan Regional Park – 9751 Ox Road, Lorton VA, 22079

Contact: 202-557-1989 , 703-472-9110, 703-725-4013, 757-561-6263, 202-352-7903

Update : San Francisco Bay Area Mongolian Naadam Festival 2013


Image Source :Bay Area Mongolian Community Association https://www.facebook.com/groups/308615715913302/

Update : NYC Mongol Naadam Celebration 2013


Image Source:  Mongol Heritage Foundation          https://www.facebook.com/MongolHeritageFoundation   https://www.facebook.com/MongolOvSoyoliinSan

 

NYC Mongol Naadam Celebration


Naadam rider 1
Naadam rider 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival.
English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

NYC Mongol Naadam

 

 

 

Please join us on Saturday July 6th for Mongol Heritage
Foundation’s Naadam Celebration.

Mongol Heritage Foundation & NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project in the NYC is holding First annual Naadam celebration in near Bethesda Fountain ,Central Park , New York. The celebration will be opened by H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations.

The NYC Mongols celebration “Naadam” 2013 will take place on Saturday July 6th from 11:00am – 7:00 pm at the west side of the “Bethesda Fountain” Central Park where the Mongol tradition of “Naadam” will happen among the all Mongol people who live in the greater New York area.

This Festivity is the one of the major celebration on the Mongols honor of the national holiday of Motherland Mongolia. During the celebration, Mongolians compete in traditional sporting events and competitions that include , wrestling, and children’s wood horse racing.
In 2010, Naadam was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

We encourage you to invite your friends and family to this exciting and interesting event where the New York Area Mongols will join together in a traditional celebration.

All of the Mongols including Buryats, Kalmyks, Hazaras ,Tuvans and Inner Mongolians are join in the celebration.

Everyone who is interested in Mongolia and Mongol Culture is invited; people who are interested in Mongolia and the Mongolian Culture such as Americans who have lived and worked in Mongolia through the Peace Corps will attend.

Where: The Bethesda Fountain, Central Park is one of the largest fountains in New York, measuring twenty-six feet high by ninety-six feet wide.It is one of the most well known fountains in the world.This neoclassical sculpture, also known as Angel of the Waters, features an eight-foot bronze angel who stands above four small cherubim representing health, purity, temperance, and peace.

Location: Bethesda Fountain, Central Park
The Mall, New York, NY 10024

When: Saturday, July 6,
Time: 11 :00 am till 7:00 pm

Opening Welcome, H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations

Greetings
Inner Mongolian Community Mr. Hasar Ayush
Kalmyk Community Ms. Kermen
Buryat Community Ms. Tsengiyev
Hazara Community Liquate Ali
Kalmyk Project NYC
Mongolian Ambulance Project
Wild Art Mongolia 2013 Expedition

The President of the Mongol Heritage Foundation Byambakhuu Darinchuluun will go over the agenda of the event

Program Highlights

Wrestling
Children’s Wood Horse Race
Children’s Shagai (ankle bone ) Game

Featuring:

Mongolian Song
Kalmyk Song
Buryat Song
Tsakhar song,
Hazara Song
Yokhor “Circle ” dancing

Contest
“I am mongol ” painting contest
The Best Traditional Mongolian male, female, and child’s clothing contest
Mongolian singing contest
Closing Ceremony Singing all Mongols .National Song (Warm Hear ted Land )

Main Organizers:
Mongol Heritage Foundation and NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project NYC,

Supporting Organizations:

Permanent Mission of Mongolia to United Nations,
Hazara Organization Progress and Equality
Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center

Sponsor:
Mongol American Cultural Association, Advanced Accounting, Sign. Inc and the NYC Inner Mongolian , Kalmyk, Hazara, Buryat, Tuva , Mongolian community

Media:
Writer, journalist , Louie Lazar
http://www.louielazar.com/

Asian Fusion Magazine , General Editor, Rick Lin
http://www.asianfusion-mag.com/

Get involved :You’ll meet new Mongol people, have fun and support a great event.

Let Mongol Culture Alive in New York City Tri-state Area

Volunteering, Partner and Sponsor Call :

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun Mongolia (347) 437-9265,
Dawood Changazi Hazara (347) 400-8591,
Kermen Dyumkeeva Kalmyk (347) 221-9123
Enkhbat Toochig Inner Mongolia (917)698-4367

Please bring food to share and your beverages to drink. There will be Mongolian food and games to play.

Boortsog, suutei tsai, byaslag and plates, napkins, silverware, etc. will be provided by the Mongol Heritage Foundation .

What to expect:
some ideas on what to expect and what you should do when you attend during Naadam Event.

Children’s Wooden Hobby Horse Rising
Although the NYC Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction.

Naadam Dress

Mongol Malgai , Mongol Deel, Khantaaz,

Wrestling
Mongolian traditional wrestling is an untimed competition in which wrestlers lose if they touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet or hand. When picking pairs, the wrestler with the greatest fame has the privilege to choose his own opponent. Wrestlers wear two-piece costumes consisting of a tight shoulder vest (zodog) and shorts (shuudag). Only men are allowed to participate.Each wrestler has an “encourager” called a zasuul. The zasuul sings a song of praise for the winning wrestler after rounds 3, 5, and 7.
Winners of the 7th or 8th stage earn the title of zaan, “elephant”. The winner of the 9th or 10th stage, is called arslan, “lion”. In the final competition, all the “zasuuls” drop in the wake of each wrestler as they take steps toward each other. Two time arslans are called the titans / giants, or avraga.

Shagai
Shagai games are especially popular during the Mongolian summer holiday of Naadam. In shagai dice, the rolled shagai generally land on one of four sides: horse, camel, sheep or goat.
Mongolians still exchange shagai today as tokens of friendship. The shagai may be kept in a little pouch.A large variety of traditional Mongolian games are played using the shagai pieces. Depending on the game, the anklebones may be tossed like dice, flicked like marbles, shot at with arrows, caught in the hands, or simply collected according to the roll of a die. In many games, the side on which a tossed piece lands (horse, sheep, camel, or goat) is significant.

Khadag
Typically it is blue to represent the beautiful blue sky. Please bring your Khadag greet with Mongols.

Mongolian Calligraphy
The Classic Mongolian script written from the top downwards and in clockwise turns and has a classic vertical direction which expresses the almost optimal movement of handwriting due to the theory of probability.

Yohor Dance
Yohor is a circle dance. Buryat Mongol peoples have some form of circle dance. Yohor is the Buryat version. The chief characteristics in this belief is the concept of the world axis, represented by a tree, by the serge, or by the oboo. As part of these customs there is the use of the circle dance for shamanist ritual and worship at these places which is called the yohor. The dance may encircle the sacred tree or object, or the shaman who is conducting a ritual. These circle dances may last for hours, and are punctuated by the phrases yohor-o or heeyo. The yohor is extremely ancient and is depicted on rock carvings thousands of years old.

NYC Mongol Library display

Mongol Library Project
Sep 2011 to Sep 2013
NYC Mongol Library is designed to provide the opportunity to explore the richness of Mongol history.
The Mongol Heritage Foundations Library provides many interesting and informative books in Mongolian, and English pertaining to Mongol history, art, geography, literature, and culture. In addition, recreational reading includes periodicals, newspapers, biographies, magazines, novels, and materials about travel.
Members can also enjoy video cassettes such as Mongol, Kalmyk , Tuvan, Hazara, Buryat, Inner Mongolian films, biographies, travel, documentaries, and life stories of Mongol Americans. We encourage members to check out books, and other materials, and reap the richness of Mongol, and Mongol-American history, events, culture, and experiences

Mongol Heritage Foundation Membership application
Mongol Heritage Foundation 2013-2014 Events Calendar

Food Tasting

Tsagaan idée -dairy products such as cheeses and hard curds

Byaslag
Cheese from milk of cattle, yaks, goats, or sheep.
Most commonly, the milk of yak and cattle is used. Goats and sheep are not milked in all places, but make for the most aromatic cheese. However, mongolian cheese doesn’t get to ripen like its european counterparts, so the overall taste is somewhat bland in comparison.

Korkhoi Aaruul
“Worm Aaruul” is a variation in the shape of little strands, often sweetened. Don’t press the fresh material, but put it through a meat grinder (available in every mongolian houshold) into small “worms”. Arrange those in little heaps for drying. This type of Aaruul is easier to chew (especially for children), but less suited for travel supplies.

Khailmag
khailmag, made from a mixture of shortening, water, flour, and sugar, pan-fried at a ridiculously high temperature until clarified oil separates at the sides of the pan. Reconstituted raisins are then added to the mix, and the result is a warm, delicious sludge that resembles a not-too-cheesy cheesecake

Suutei Tsai- The most favored drink during this holiday is Mongol milk tea .Milk tea is an indispensable part of the Mongolian’s daily life.

khuushuur
One of the Mongolian most famous delicious meals is of course the Khuushuur. It’s a meal that consist of meat, onions and other ingredients put together and wrapped with flour dough, and afterwards it’s fried in oil. Everyone loves the taste of khuushuur in Mongolia..Mongolians hold the fresh khuushuur between their palms and also with the tips of all fingers to stimulate the nerves and blood circulation in the hands. This is believed to be curative. In some occasions, a hot khuushuur is placed on the soles of the feet and other selected places to treat neurosis and health conditions related to the balance of the air element of the five elements composing the human body.

Boortsog
Boortsog Mongolian Deep Fried Cookies

After Party
There will be Naadam Party starting at 10pm;

Music
DJ Baagii Beatz is pleased to announce the music for NYC Mongols

Naadam celebration 2013. The music has a largely Mongol theme. Event organizers have put considerable thought into selecting the music, and their choices blend traditional music with some newly commissioned pieces.

Address :BOSS Lounge @ Ktown; 10 West 32nd Street 5th Floor
New York, NY 10001.

RSVP: 718.749.6006, 347.437.9265

http://www.mixcrate.com/djbaagii
https://www.facebook.com/DjBaagiiBeatz

 

 

 

Ph.D. in Bio statistics Sanj Altan received one of the highest hon-ours bestowed upon a foreigner by the Mongolian Government: the Friendship (Nairamdal) Medal.


blog

Washington DC, USA: Germany-born Ph.D. in Bio statistics Sanj Altan received one of the highest hon-ours bestowed upon a foreigner by the Mongolian Government: the Friendship (Nairamdal) Medal. Presented by Zandaakhuu Enkhbold Chairman of the State Great Hural (Chairman of the Mongolian Parliament )in a U.S. Capitol ceremony,March 20, 2013, the medal is a reflection of the affection and appreciation felt by Mongolians for his work. Sanj Altan was born in 1947 in Pfaffenhofen, Germany. His family emigrated to the US in 1951. His grandparents had fled Russia following the 1918 revolution and were part of the Kalmyk emigre community in Eastern Europe during the 20s, 30s and 40s. He graduated from Rutgers University in 1968 and from Temple University in 1977, with a PhD. in Bio statistics. He is currently employed by Johnson & Johnson where he supports pharmaceutical drug development. Sanj Altan traces his interest in Mongol culture to his parents, who insisted on speaking their Mongolian dialect at home, and his teachers, the late Professor Gombojab Hangin, who inspired his pursuit of the Pan-Mongol movement, and the late Tsorj Lama, former Abbott of the Khorgha Temple in Western Sunid, Inner Mongolia, who inspired his spiritual pursuit of the annual commemoration of Chinggis Khan.

 

A day celebrating Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity in Princeton, New Jersey


March 7, 2013: A March 2013 issue of the eTolbo has been published with additional material covering the 2012 Chinggis Khan Ceremony. Please make sure to read the well-written, first-person account of one of the attendees of the Chinggis Khan Ceremony! Many thanks to  Sansar Tsakhirmaa
I first became aware of the Mongol American Cultural Association (MACA) when I was googling for information on Mongolic communities based in the U.S. approximately four years ago. By visiting MACA’s website for the first time, I was also informed that a ceremony-featuring ethnocommunal gathering has been held on a yearly basis since the late 1980s. Having long yearned for connecting to the small,dispersed, but proud Mongolic communities in the American Northeast, in November,2012, I was lucky enough to reach Princeton and witness in person the burgeoning spirit of Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity that would not be similarly feltelsewhere. Not a historian, I’m not going to recount the founding myths of Mongolic peoples. Not a poet, I’m not going to couch my feeling with the event in literary phrases. Instead, as a student of social science, I consider that November day as one raising the consciousness of Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity within our diasporic communities and inviting further dialogues and even brotherly supports across our communities in Mongolia-the-independent-state, Southern Mongolia, Kalmyk, Buryatia, Tuva, and Hazaristan. Ethno national identity tells one who he or she is, who he or she is not,and of which group he or she may claim membership. The shared distinct self-identification of being ethnically Mongolic, regardless of whatever tribal affiliations, whatever religious practices, whatever linguistic nuances, whatever historical trajectories,would not have been around without an essentially similar collective memory of the political entity founded by Chinggis Khan centuries ago that gave rise to what is later known as a common claim to be Mongolic. However, in our times, such a common allegiance has rarely been hailed in an all-inclusive manner until MACA’s magnanimous efforts. While those from Mongolia-the-independent-state may not only claim their Mongolic identity but also be recognized as such, those of Mongolic heritages but from outside Mongolia may have, to varying extent, to inhibit their Mongolic identities for practical reasons. In this regard, the génie of Chinggis Khan Memorial Ceremony consists in its offering an opportunity for Mongolic peoples outside Mongolia the-independent-state to jointly and unfetteredly assert their
Mongolic identities, even if that lasts for only one day. Thus, many of our ethnic kins who may use non-Mongolic languages in daily life drove hundreds of miles for the annual gathering simply to “reboot” the aspect of their identity for which they want recognition and preservation.If coming together in honor of Chinggis Khan were all about identity, then we might ignore how much the event is also meant for promoting greater mutual contact,understanding, network, kinship, and even empathetic feelings among different Mongolic groups, among individuals within a group,and among individuals across groups. I positively noticed that attendees, different Mongolic groups as they represent, were not necessarily concentrated according to specific group or regional identities, but presented a tendency to seat themselves randomly, which had the potential of facilitating conversations between individuals who might previously have had little knowledge about one another’s Mongolic heritage. The event was also my first of its kind where members of different Mongolic groups had an opportunity to appreciate one another’s music, songs, and dances all within one sitting. I was no less impressed with the already-established cross-group networks evinced at the reception where members of different Mongolic groups were able to proactively approach one another. A day of building consciousness of one an other’s existence and experience may pave way for further interactions conducive to the development of emotional attachment. Such attachment will be indispensable in order to genuinely bind various Mongolic groups together by transcending the linguistic, religious,cultural, historical,and political barriers that give them myriad justifications not to build solidarity with one another. Solidarity building does not need to come at the expense of the amazingly diverse historical, cultural, religious, and linguistic heritages various Mongolic peoples claim. If MACA designates this annual ceremonial event for allowing people of Mongolic roots to assert a common identity as well as for generating greater cohesion among them, then it can equally be understood as a stage on which for Mongolic peoples to share with one another the unique and distinct aspect of their identity.
The dancers and singers from Mongolia-the-independent-state represented the most-blossoming and best-supported of Mongolic cultural traditions by showcasing the biyelgee dance as well as the inebriatingly beautiful operatic singing’s developed out of folk songs (ardiin duu). In the meantime, the band from the Ordos subregion of Southern Mongolia signaled to attendees a persistent and unrelenting pride Southern Mongolians take in their Mongolic identity by graciously blending both ethnic andpopular elements into their rendition and by offering a medley of Southern Mongolian folk songs that people like me have been so much missing. Buryat artist Namgar Lkhasaranova and the other two ethnomusicians demonstrated the highly distinct musical heritage of the Buryat people in Southern Siberia that I had not been able to contemplate until at the event. As the first Mongolic community settled in the U.S. and the most significant proponents of MACA, Kalmyks dedicated their fusion of Oiratic and North Caucasus traditions, which again invited various Mongolic peoples to marvel at our diversity. Though subjected to mass deportation in the mid-1940s, Kalmyks not only maintained their ethnic morale, but also initiated the presence of Mongolic peoples in the U.S. The representation of the Iranic-speaking Hazara people at the ceremony can also be marked as an example of re-oriented ethnonational consciousness and of the tremendous cultural and historical diversity among Mongolic peoples we have yet to explore. Hereby, another génie of MACA’s annual Chinggis Khan Memorial Ceremony is its serving as probably the only occasion, tomy knowledge, to be able to integrate a widest possible range of Mongolic diversity into one theme.
Thanks to pioneers of our senior generations from Southern Mongolia (Övör Mongol),Kalmykia (Xalimag), and Mongolia-the-independent-state (Ar Mongol) who sowed the seeds for a Pan-Mongolic communal tradition in the U.S., this annual gathering has been hopefully achieving a threefold mission: commemorating a common founding hero, Chinggis Khan, who laid the foundation for the distinct identities Mongolic peoples hail today, congregating people of various Mongolic heritages to facilitate their mutual understandings as well as to revive ethnic kinship that has been historically undermined, as well as consolidating support from the greater U.S. society with regard to issues concerning the Mongolic world. In retrospect, this year we have had music and dance heritages of Mongolia-the-independent-state, Southern Mongolia, Kalmykia, Buryatia represented. In prospect, perhaps next year there would be those of Tuva and Hazaristan added?

 

Mongolian American Yahoo Groups


  1. Amerikmongolchuud · “AmerikMongolchuud” Mongolian Community
  2. arlington_mongolians · Arlington area Mongolians
  3. bay_area_mongolian_soccer · Bay Area Mongolian Soccer
  4. bay_area_mongolians · The Bay Area Mongolian Community
  5. california_mongols
  6. ChicagoMongols · Chicago Mongols
  7. colo_mongols · Colorado Mongolians
  8. dctsuglaan · DC Mongol Tsuglaan
  9. florida_mongolians
  10. HamagMongol · Mongolian Americans
  11. LA_MONGLOBAL
  12. la_mongolchurch
  13. la_mongols
  14. mongolianyouthleaders · Mongolian Youth Leaders
  15. orloo · Welcome to Orloo Group
  16. sac_mongolians · sacramento_mongolians
  17. sfbaymongols
  18. us_mongols · US Mongols
  19. wastate_mongolians · WA State dahi Mongolchuud
  20. mongoliadc
  21. New_York_Mongolians
  22. temtsel · Bainuu US Mongolian Community
  23. huhtenger  Bay Area Mongolians
  24. mongol_toronto
  25. mgl_immanuel · “Immanuel” San Francisco Mongolian Christian church
  26. Canada_Mongol · Canadian Mongolian
  27. albertamongols · Alberta Mongols
  28. AmericanMongols · American Mongolian Academy 
  29. mongolian_frontiers · American Mongolian Frontiers
  30. themongolianschool
  31. mongoliancommunity · Mongolian Community  Center Los Angeles
  32. MongolSurguuli · Mongol Surguuli
  33. mongolcc · Mongolian Cultural Center
  34. m_americans · Mongolian Americans’s Group
  35. helpj1students · Support Mongolian J-1 students
  36. mongoltoronto · Mongolian Community of Ontario
  37. sac_mgl_students · Mongolian Students Club in Sacramento
  38. fulbright_mongolia_2011 · Mongolian Fulbright group 2011 

 

Kalmyk Day , New Jersey


KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

 

Soccer Game at Oak Glen Park Begins @ 9:00am
Teams: Mongolian, Tibetan & Kalmyks

Then Kalmyk Cultural Day Begins @ 2:00pm
Performances by:

  • Kalmyk Adult Dancers, Singers
  • Kalmyk Kids’ Singers, Dombar players
  • Kalmyk Rock Band
  • Ethnic Food Tastings
  • Cash Bar – Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Shaslik

Smithsonian Institute will be present along with Local Press coverage

KALMYK DAY AUGUST 19, 2012

Mongol American Facebook Page


Mongol American is inviting you to visit Facebook Page to build a closer relationship with your Mongol American Friends and their organizations.  Support Local Mongol American Business or find nearest Mongol Events Activity to join.

  1. Mongol Heritage Foundation
  2.  MongolEvents
  3. Mongolian Community of Los Angeles Metropolitan Area
  4. Mongolian Community of Denver Colorado Area
  5. Mongolian Community of  Washington DC Area
  6. Mongolian Community of San Francisco Bay Area
  7. Mongolian Community  of Seattle Metropolitan Area
  8. Mongolian Community Association of Colorado
  9. Mongolian American Chamber of Commerce
  10. Mongolian Community Association of Wisconsin
  11. Mongolian Community Association of Texas
  12. Sacramento Mongolian Community Association (MCA) Sacramento
  13. New York Area Mongolians
  14. Southern Mongolian Human Rights
  15. Mongolian Students Club at City College of San Francisco
  16. Alliance of Mongolians in USA
  17. San Francisco State University Mongolians
  18. Orloo
  19. Chicago Mongolian School
  20. Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center
  21. Illinois State Mongolian Non Profit Organizations United Council
  22. Chicago 1st Ward Mongolians
  23. Mongolian Soccer League in Washington DC
  24. Washington DC Area Mongolians
  25. Mongol American Cultural Association
  26. Mongolian Cultural Center
  27. Mongolian School of Colorado
  28. UB Nails
  29. Altan Bumbug Club
  30. Mongolian Women’s Development Foundation
  31. US-Mongolia tennis club
  32. Mongolian American Student Association
  33. Air Bridge LLC
  34. City of Ulaanbaatar Park, Denver Colorado
  35. Tulga Club
  36. SF Bay Mongolians
  37. TulgaT
  38. Mongolians in Seattle
  39. Blue Sky Education Project
  40. Toronto Mongolians
  41. The Mongol Children’s Festival and Competition in USA
  42. American Mongolian Association 
  43. Mongol Rally Team America 
  44. SFSU Mongolians
  45. Mongolian American Chamber of Commerce
  46. Mongolian in America book
  47. Ella Ekko
  48. SweetYmotion
  49. Amirdash
  50. Aka Odko
  51. Nominjin
  52. Mongolian American Football Association 
  53. Mongolian American Basketball Association
  54. Mongolian American Children’s Foundation
  55. Miss Mongolia USA
  56. US Mongolia Tennis Club
  57. Association of Mongolian Students In America
  58. Sterling Ballet Academy
  59. Seattle Mongol Church
  60. MG Logistics LLC
  61. Mashbat Brothers/Films

Mongol American Facebook Page  

Mongol American Facebook Groups


 

Mongol American Presenting Facebook Groups.

Are you eager to looking for Mongol Americans on Facebook Groups ?

We are recommending to you  recent and most active Facebook Groups .

  1. NYC Mongol
  2. Mongolian Student Association-Los Angeles
  3. Mongolians in Boston
  4. Cool Mongolians Chi-Town only Chicago
  5. Chicago Bulls Mongolian Fans
  6. Bay Area Mongolians Zar
  7. Mongolian American Student Association (MASA)
  8. Chicago Mongolian Football
  9. Bay Area Mongolian Com
  10. The Mongolian School of the National Capitol Area
  11. NYC MGL
  12. Cool Mongolians in Los Angeles
  13. Mongolians in Saskatoon  Canada
  14. Hazara Mongolian Global Initiative
  15. Young Mongolian Professionals Association in America ,NGO
  16. Mongolian Students Non Profit  Organization in America (MSNOA)
  17. DMV Mongolians
  18. Hazara Association of Canada
  19. Kalmyk American Association
  20. Kalmyk Brotherhood Society
  21. Buryats in America
  22. NYC & New Jersey Kalmyks
  23. Гадаадад суугаа монголчууд (Mongolians who lives in Overseas)
  24. American Youth Leadership Program with Mongolian
  25. American Mongolian Basketball
  26. Canadian Alumni of Mongolia
  27. PC- Mongolia DC
  28. Mongolian American Women’s Association
  29. Mongolians in Boston (the new better version)

 

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab


Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab (1883–1964) was supposedly the last Mongolian Khutugtu, a Lamaist dignitary believed to be an incarnation of Buddha, politician and Mongolian-American scholar. Jamsrangjab was a Khalkha Mongolian and considered the living Buddha among the Mongols. He had strong friendly ties with Dalai Lama and Chiang Kai-shek. Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, respected Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab as his mentor and teacher during his visit to the monastery he founded in New Jersey, USA.

When Jamsrangjab was born to commoners, Bashlu and Gimbeles, in Zagdsambar of Zasagt Khan (in modern Zavkhan Province), there spread mysterious but amazing tales about his born. At his age of 5, Bogd Khan declared Jamsrangjab to be the after-life of the late Diluwa. Jamsrangjab with his parents moved to the capital city Nyislel Khuryee. He studied the philosophy of Buddhism so hard that he was awarded religious dignities at the age of 7 and 21.

In 1916 the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to the south-eastern frontier of Bogd Khaanate Mongolia with the Mongolian general, Khatanbaatar Magsarjav to ease the conflict between the Mongols and the Republic of China. Sometime around C. 1919, he attempted to visit Russia to ask help against the growing influence of China, but he was stopped at the borderline due to incomplete identity documents. Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was also seeking to ask assistance from the United States of America to support the independence of Mongolia.

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was arrested in 1930 due to the accusation that he was linked with the so-called anti-communist leader, Eregdendagva. He was freed later after he didn’t accept the trial. On 26 February 1931, the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to China by the government of Mongolian People’s Republic to spy on Banchin Bogd of Inner Mongolia, the Kuomintang, and Japanese spies operating in Inner Mongolia. After he had gone, false rumours about him spread among people. At the time, he didn’t know he would never come back to his homeland again.

While he stayed in Tibet for 3 years, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was a tutor for the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso.

On 28 June 1932, he met Banchin Bogd and attended the conference about the Khalkha Mongolia in Nanjing. While residing in Inner Mongolia, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab established contacts with prince Demchugdongrub of the western Sunid (a Mongol tribe) and his fellow Japanese. The political and military leader of China, Chiang Kai-shek, admired his skills after the two had made good friends in a companion. His safety was in danger in Mongolia when his Mongolian colleagues were purged and executed in outer Mongolia in 1937-39. He fled Mongolia when the leftists attacked on the Buddhist Clergy in 1930s.Since everybody who knew his real mission in China all disappeared or executed, the Diluwa Khutugtu was called falsely political refugee and anti-communist.

After he came to the USA in 1949 with the assistance of Owen Lattimore and fellow professors, Jamsranjab worked at the Johns Hopkins University. There he joined American-British professor Owen Lattimore‘s the Mongolia Project.In New Jersey, he founded a Monastery with Kalmyk American lamas in 1950-1952. He was elected the chief lama of the Monastery there. When he was in the USA, he still worked for the international recognition of Mongolian independence.

He influenced Chan Kai Shek to declare “Mongolia can be a member of the United Nations like other independent nations” in 1960.On 7 April 1965, the last Mongolian Khutugtu, Jamsrangjab, died at the age of 82 in New York. In 1990, the supreme court of Mongolia proved his innocence and abolished all decrees that accused him of false political crimes.

Source : Wikipedia

Source : Mongol American Cultural Association

Source : Dilowa Khutugtu Memorial Foundation

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION OF HAZARA MONGOL


 

BY: ISHAQ MOHAMMADI

ISHAQ MOHAMMADI

Respected guests! It is a great honor to be here and celebrate 850th anniversary of the greatest conqueror in human history. The Great Gengez Khan was not only a great warrior but also a great thinker of his time, who bestowed a comprehensive law in the form of YASA to his people and other entire conquered nations. It is a matter of sorrow that some historians especially Iranians and Arabs have mentioned him and his successors as barbaric while it is a fact that on the contrary he, along with his successors brought peace, stability, justice and prosperity to all the conquered regions and introduced unique kinds of knowledge and art. It was Mongols who promoted miniature art to its peak especially during the Ilkhante period (Ikhan means younger Khan). They also promoted the new form of history writing which we  in Persian say “WAQAE NIGARI” or narration of facts. Some famous Muslim historians like Rashid-ud-Din-Fazlluah, Juwayni, Wassaf etc are  gifts of Ilkhante Mongol dynasty. The famous kind of Persian inscription “NASTALIQ” that is being used till now, is also the gift of the Great khan’s successors.

Honorable guests! It is not possible for me to shed light on the life of this greatest conqueror of the world but it is a good opportunity to introduce briefly my Hazara nation who is a part of “ULUS MUQUUL” that  the Great Khan himself named in spring 1206,s “QORALTAE” or grand assembly  held in “QURAQURAM”. Historians, who know Hazaras, believe that they are pure Mongol or some believe that they are turcko-Mongolian origin. It is correct that some Turkic tribes like QALAJ, QARLUQ , TURKMAN etcare now part of Hazara nation but the big portion of Hazara nation consists of pure Mongol origin. Like DAE CHOPAN (an Ilkhante commander), DAE BERKA(a Mongol commander), , ARGHUN (Il Khanate Commander), NEKODAR(Jughtain commander)or  BESUD .It  would be  very interesting for the audience to know that in Hazara BESUD there is a sub-tribe with the name of  “BURJAQIN”  which is believed to be the name of the tribe of the Great Khan himself. It is worth mentioning that the Turk tribe like NAEMAN is now part of Hazara nation but was merged into “ULUS MUQUUL” by the Great Khan. Historically it has been proved that up to the early 16th century some Hazara tribes were speaking Mongolian language as mentioned by king Babur the founder of Mughul dynasty in India in his famous book TUZKI BABURI. Despite the similarity of tribal names there are dozens of places in Hazarajat with the purely Mongolian name like JIGHATU near Ghazni  (driven with name of JUGHTAEE, the Great Khan’s son), BU-SED (taken with the name of ILKHANATE king BU-SAEED). CHOPAN (an  ILKHANATE commander as mentioned earlier).

Honorable guests, in spite of all other historic facts, a scientific research carried by Oxford University Bio-Chemistry Department in 2003, also proved that Hazara people are Mongolian origin. It is worth to mention that a campaign has been initiated here in the United States to explore the origin of Hazara through complete DNA test. I am sure that the finding of this research will not be other than the research done by the Oxford University of Great Brittan.

Hazara as a new nation established a great kingdom under  Arghun dynasty  in early 16th century which consists from Kabul to Sindh (present Pakistan). Later on Babur captured Kabul and Qandahar but their rule remained intact on the vast areas of northern Balochistan, Sindh and Multan (present Pakistan) up to 1591 A.D. The reflection of  the glory of Arghun can be seen in “MUKHLI” graveyard Thatha, which was the capital of this dynasty. Keeping in view the unique style of construction MUKHLI has been entitled as “World Heritage”.

Honorable guests!  Unfortunately the deprivation of Hazara started on the rise of Safavid in Iran. Safavid captured Qandahar in 1653A.D and posted Gargin Khan as governor with a clear intention to expel Hazara Mongol from plain lands of Heart to Kabul. He did complete this task by pushing Hazaras from their plain lands and planted a new Pashtoon Ghalzai tribe on the occupied Hazara lands. This occupation process kept continued and even made faster during ABDALID in 18th century. And this policy was finalized by Amir Abdur Rehman during 1880 to 1893 who annexed Hazarajat the land of Hazara nation and made part of his new Afghan kingdom (Afghanistan) forcefully. During 1880 to 1893 war, Amir Abdul Rehman has eliminated 62% of Hazaras in Hazarajat and disowned them of their fertile lands which were later on, distributed among Pashtoon nomads (Kochi). Therefore now historians agree that from hundred to hundred and fifty thousand square miles has been reduced in total area of Hazara home land.

Ladies and gentlemen! Despite all this massacre and genocide, Hazaras being a Mongol warrior not only exist in Afghanistan but now considered as a hope for a bright future of this war hit country because of their extra ordinary constructive abilities. Hazaras have got the highest education rate in Afghanistan in both genders. The  ever first Olympic medalist Rohullah Nekpai, ever first world boxing champion Hamid Rahimi, ever first female Governor Habiba Sarabi and ever first female Mayor Azra Jafferi  are the best proofs of being an extra ordinary nation in Afghanistan’s three centuries long history from one hand, while on the other hand it also reflect to their Mongolian origin ethnicity in which women had and still have a significant role in the society. Otherwise in Afghanistan like orthodox Muslim scenario, women are considered as an absurd product.

Honorable guests! During the Dark Age of Abdur Rehman and later on during Taliban era a large number of Hazaras were compelled to leave their home land Hazarajat and take refuge in neighboring countries. A huge number took refuge in Iran but unfortunately because of their Mongolian back ground they are being treated in-human and called Hazaras as BARBARI, which means barbarian. Hazaras are still struggling to use their original name in Iran but only have been allowed to use the meaningless name of KHAWARI (Eastern people) instead of Hazara. However, in British India Now Pakistan they were treated equally. Therefore, they flourished in all aspects of life quickly. Just imagine that a young Hazara Musa Khan recruited in British army as a common soldier but by his Mongol genetic ability he rose to the post of Commander In Chief of Pakistan army. He successfully led Pakistan army in 1965 Indo-Pak war with 5 time bigger Indian army, however it will be interesting for audience to add that later, during in other war in 1971, this same Pakistan army not only lost his Eastern part present Bangladesh but also faced one of the world’s biggest army surrender of more than 95 thousand soldiers to the Indian army.

Ladies and gentlemen! Unfortunately for last 12 years this most educated and well organized Pakistani Hazaras are facing a wave of genocide and ethnic cleansing by state backed religious extremist militants. So far, more than 600 innocent Hazaras mostly educated and professional have been killed. Once again thousands of Hazaras have been compelled to take refuge in western countries and other thousands are seeking for. But despite all these, I firmly believe that being a Mongol we will survive because we are survivors of the fittest.

Honorable guests! Taking the opportunity of this historic occasion I want to mention here especially for my Mongolian historians and academicians that a huge first hand treasure of information about Great Mongols are available in Persian either in printed or manuscript forms in Iran Pakistan, Afghanistan and India or in big libraries of the world. No doubts without this treasure, compilation of an authentic comprehensive history of Great Mongols are almost impossible. Therefore, I humbly request to my Mongol academicians to take necessary steps for collection and translation of this treasure in to Mongolian and English. Due to shortage of time I am mentioning here a few basic famous sources:-

  1. 1.     Jame-u-tarikh or Compendium of Chronicles written by Rashid-ud-Din
  2. 2.     Tarikhi Jahan Gushah or The history of world conqueror  written by Malik Ata Juwayni
  3. 3.     Tarikhi Wassaf  written by Abdullah Wassaf

These published books were written during Ilkhanate period under direct supervision of Ilkanate kings. 

  1. 4.     Shah name-e-Changezi  un-published book, one manuscript copy is lying in British Museum. It seems that it has been written in poetry form in patron of famous Persian historic book Shah name-e-Firdausi.
  2. 5.     Turkhan Nama written by Syed Mir Mohammad Tatavi, it is about Hazara Arghun dynasty who ruled from Kabul to Sindh during  15th and 16th centuries.

Fortunately I have visited some old libraries in Sindh and Punjab Pakistan, there are dozens of valuable published or un-published historic books about Mongol history in Persian consist of first hand informations. It would be very interesting for my honorable guests that in 2008, I found two very rare books by the name of GHAZAN NAMA and another one OLJAETU NAMA which cover almost all official activities of these two Great kings of Ilkanate dynasty from Karachi Pakistan, in a Sunday footpath book bazaar.

At the end I would like to say especial thanx to birar Baymabakhuu who made possible all this arrangement and of course the organizers of this great event who provide me this opportunity to speak in such a great historic event with such an honorable audience. Thank you very much.

Note:- This write-up was presented in the event of 850th “Anniversary of Chinggis Khaan”   in Mongolian Embassy Washington DC, on May 5th. It was a two Days(May 4-5,2012) International Conference organized by “ The Mongolian Cultural Center Washington” and “The Embassy of Mongolia Washington” In partnership with “The Mongolian Institute for Defense Studies” With contribution from Mongol-American Cultural Association. Well renowned scholars from USA, Mongolia, Canada, Germany, Qazaqstan, Norway, Turkey, Azerbaijan and Korea were presented their articles and presentations. National Geographic Society’s Mr. Albert Yu Min Lin was also presented his presentation.

Source :http://www.wahdatnews.com

 

Mongols United Party NYC


NYC Mongols Presents

“Mongols United Party”

New york City Area Mongolian, Buryat, Kalmyk , Hazara , Southern Mongolians, RPCV-Mongolia , American friends then others .

When :July 29th , 2012

Where : Harmony Terrace 47-57 41st St, Sunny side, NY 11104

Time : 8:00 pm to 2:00 am

Tax : 15$

Program :

Who, Why , ……….Damn Mongols
Beginning with Facebook Match for Single’s Marathon
Dance Competition
Surprise

Call reservation 202-718-4638

Mongol Naadam Denver Update


 

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Image Source : Mongolian Community Association of Colorado

 

Wisconsin Naadam Update


 

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Source :Mongolian Community Association of Wisconsin

 

Los Angeles Mongol Naadam Update


 

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Image Source : Asuult.net 

 

Carolina Mongol Naadam Update


 

Carolina Mongol Naadam Update

 

Goomaralmongol

Каролина Монгол Хээрийн Аялал Наадам 2012

Каролинагийн монголчууд бид хээрийн аялал Наадамаа 7 дугаар сарын 14, 15 нд

Asheboro ,NC хотын “Deepriver” гэдэг газарт Хойд Каролинагийн өнцөг булангаас цугларан наадлаа. Эхний өдөр асар майханаа барилцан, нутгынхаа дуу хуур тавьсан шигээ, задгай цагаан, хүмүүн төрөлхтөн гэсэн олон сайхан уламжлал болсон нийтийн бүжгүүдийг эргэлдэн эргэн санан дурслаа.

15 – ны өглөө бид шаргуу наадмын хуушуур хийх ажилдаа бүх нийтээрээ ханцуу шамлан орж, олон хүний сэтгэл хүч, хөдөлмөр хөлс шингэсэн, халуун нар, тосонд шарсан алдартай хуушуураа хийж, наадмын үйл ажилгаагаа Монголын далбаагаа мандуулан, наадмын үзэсгэлэн гарган, Төрийн Дуулал дуулан, Монгол ёслолгоо ёслон эхлээ.

Монголчууд бид бахархах эх орон, баяр наадам, өвөрмөгц соёл урлаг, ахуй амьдралтайгаас гадна эрхэмлэн хүндэтгэх ёс заншилтай билээ. Ингээд бид Монголын үндэсний наадмын онцлогыг харуулсан асуулт хариултын хэлэлцэл явуулж, мэдэхгүйд мэдлэг, мэддэгт илүүдэхгүй гэгчээр бяцхан ч гэсэн “Наадмын танин мэдэхүй тольтой” танилцлаа.

Монгол ардын “Мянгад” бүжгийг П.Нандиа, “Хүүхдийн сэтгэхүй” болон…

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Mongol Naadam Seattle Update


 

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Image Source : Seattle Mongol Church

 

Farewell, MONGOLIA


As my posting in Mongolia draws to a close, I want to publicly thank Mongolians living across the country – from Dornod to Bayan Ulgii – for their interest, hospitality and support.

I will remember many things about Mongolia.  But, perhaps more than anything, I will remember the vastness of the steppe; the beauty of the mountains; the brilliance of the night stars; and the personal kindnesses extended by so many Mongolians at every step of the way.  A sense for the fascinating history and unique culture of this great country will also linger, long after my formal assignment in Mongolia concludes.

In fact, it has been my privilege to live and work in Mongolia twice – first as USAID country director (2001-2004) and now as Ambassador (2009-2012).  On each occasion, I was able to visit all 21 of Mongolia’s provinces.

My wife Fiona shares my deep appreciation for Mongolia and our three children Iain, Cameron and Catriona have spent much of their early childhoods in this country, carrying with them memories that will last a lifetime.  As a family, we have slept in gers and camped beside lakes and rivers in every corner of this spacious and beautiful land.  We have also learned from the many Mongolians we have met, at times sharing in their customs, celebrations and rich traditions.

Earlier this month, we had the unforgettable opportunity to welcome Secretary of State Clinton to Mongolia, a historic visit in which she met with President Elbegdorj, Prime Minister Batbold and Foreign Minister Zandanshatar and also addressed the Executive Meeting of the Community of Democracies as well as the International Women’s Leadership Forum.

Looking back over the entire span of three years, I am especially gratified by the many concrete ways in which the ties between the United States and Mongolia have become both deeper and stronger:

— In 2009, the US Embassy sponsored three Fulbright scholarships for higher education in the United States; for 2011, the figure reached sixteen, including ten scholars funded by the Government of Mongolia.  At this point, at least 1,200 and perhaps as many as 2,500 Mongolians are studying in the United States.

— Recently, the first Mongolian was admitted to the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point.  Over the past few years, many more Mongolians have received private scholarships to attend leading American universities including Harvard, Stanford and Yale.

— In 2009, US exports to Mongolia barely reached $40 million; for 2011, the figure surpassed $313 million.  Over the past three years, General Electric opened an office in Ulaanbaatar; Bloomberg Television established a presence in Mongolia; Wagner-Asia launched branch offices in Darkhan and Khan Bogd; and Mongolia signaled its intent to move its national airline MIAT toward an all-Boeing fleet.  Major American companies such as Peabody are now poised to make a highly positive mark, joining with Mongolian partners to bring high safety standards, the latest technology and a long-term commitment to developing Mongolia’s mineral sector in a way that is ethical and reflects concern for the environment.

— In April 2010, our Embassy received the first ever “Green Embassy of the Year Award” from the US Department of State, in recognition of our attention to environmental concerns.

— In June 2010, Mongolia was one of the first four countries world-wide to receive a large grant under the Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation, sponsored by the US Department of State — $585,000 to help preserve and protect Amarbayasgalant Monastery, located in a beautiful valley in Selenge aimag, five hours north of Ulaanbaatar.

— In June 2010, the Los Angeles based band Ozomatli visited Mongolia, attracting some 20,000 Mongolians to hear their music in Sukhbaatar Square.  To this day, the Ozomatli concert remains the single largest cultural event that the United States Embassy has ever sponsored in Mongolia.

— In November 2010, we welcomed into our home a group of disabled Mongolians representing the Mongolian NGO Wind Bird, returning from a memorable trip to discuss disability issues in the United States.  Throughout my tenure, Fiona and I have sought to ensure the involvement of disabled Mongolians across the full range of Embassy-sponsored programs in Mongolia.

— In March 2011, it was my privilege to travel to Kabul to spend several days with the Mongolian soldiers serving there.  The emergence of Mongolia as a “peacekeeping nation” is a remarkable development, most recently resulting in the deployment of the first of what will eventually be 850 Mongolian soldiers serving in the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.

— In April 2011, the Embassy launched a $25 million renovation project, symbolizing our continued and enduring commitment to partnering with Mongolia in a wide range of areas.

— In June 2011, President Elbegdorj met with President Obama in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC.  During this same visit, he also opened Mongolia’s first Consulate in San Francisco.

— In August 2011, Vice President Biden visited Mongolia – the first such visit by a sitting American Vice President in 67 years.  This visit also inaugurated our Embassy use of Facebook and Twitter.

— In January 2012, the Mongolian National Archives presented to me – which I in turn presented to our Library of Congress in Washington, DC – a facsimile copy of the travel pass given in 1862 to a “Mr. Felosi,” marking the 150th anniversary of what was very possibly the first American citizen to ever visit Mongolia.

— In June 2012, the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) in Mongolia received the MCC’s first ever “Country Commitment Award”, given in part to recognize the special attention that MCA has paid to gender concerns.

Over the past year, Americans and Mongolians have together celebrated several notable anniversaries, including the 20th anniversary of Peace Corps in Mongolia; the 20th anniversary of USAID in Mongolia; and the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between our two countries.

In celebrating that 25th anniversary of diplomatic ties, I am often reminded of a statement made many decades ago by an American diplomat named A.W. Ferrin.  Serving as a commercial officer in Peking, he argued in as early as 1918 that the United States should establish a diplomatic presence in Urga, as Ulaanbaatar was then known.  According to his message back to Washington, if the US were to open such an office, it would become “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country”.

Throughout my three-year tenure in Mongolia, I have sought every day to fulfill the promise of that early aspiration – to indeed do my best to ensure that, as a proud partner and friendly third neighbor, the United States would indeed prove to be “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country.”

Thank you once again for the many kindnesses that we have received over these last three years.  As a family, we wish the people and country of Mongolia every success in the years ahead.  We also sincerely hope that relations between the United States and Mongolia will continue to prosper.

Ambassador Jonathan Addleton

Source: http://english.news.mn/content/114436.shtml

Pensylvania Naadam Picnic


Mongolian Community Association Pennsylvania Presents:

Mongol Naadam Picnic

Where : Lower Allen Township Park 2233 Gettysburg Road Camp Hill , PA, 17011

When : Monday , July , 16th

Time : 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Contact : 240-575-8055

Program:  Coming Soon

Denver Mongol Naadam 2012


Mongolian Community Association  of Colorado Presents :

Mongol Naadam 2012 Denver Colorado

Where : Village Green Park  9301. E. Union Avenue, Greenwood Village, CO 80111

When : Sunday , July , 15th

Time : 10:00 am

Contact : 720-210-4336

Program :

  • Opening Ceremony
  • Mongolian National Flag Presidents of MCAC Ch. Tugs-saikhan Ch. will open the Mongol Naadam
  • National Anthem of Mongolia
  • Horse Head Fiddle ( Mongolian National Intrument)  Performance Morin Khuur Player M. Ariunbold
  • Special Appearance by Mongolian  State Honored  Singer Mr. G. Erdenebat
  • Folk Dance F.Anda
  • Mongolian Song By D. Jamyan-myadag
  • Contortionist A. Tsenguun
  • Mongolian Song By  N. Gantulga
  • Parade of Traditional Clothing
  • Mongolian Wrestling
  • Children’s Horse Race
  • Archery
  • Shagain Harvaa ( Uncle game shooting )
  • Children’s Wrestling
  • Dembee ( Traditional game of singing)
  • Chess Competition
  • Tug of War
  • Volleyball  Ikhtal Team VS Golden Cup Team
  • Award Ceremony
  • Closing Ceremony Singing of the Mongolians  .National Song (Warm Hear ted Land )

Wisconsin Mongol Naadam Picnic


Mongolian Community Association of Wisconsin Presents :

Mongolian National Naadam Holiday Event.

When : Saturday , July, 14th

Where :James Madison Park  ,614 East Gorham Street  , Madison WI

Time : 10:00 am

Program  Highlights:

  • Opening Ceremony
  • We will sang Mongolian national anthem with great pride of National Naadam , each person put hands clasped tightly on their heart
  • Mongolian Entertainment
  • Mongolian Wrestling
  • Kids Horse Racing (Wood Hobby Horse )
  • Shagai Shooting (uncle game )
  • Fun game
  • Live Auction
  • Mongolian Karaoke
  • Dance

Introducing Picnic spot.

James Madison Park is located in downtown Madison.The basketball courts, volleyball court, and playground are popular destinations for the locals.http://www.cityofmadison.com/parks/

Please bring your own tent , chair, blanket, sun protected oil, .

Contact :  Saraa 920- 712- 5317

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Naadam Update Florida


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The Florida Mongolian Community   has been celebrated Mongolian National Holiday, Naadam  Picnic  at  Sand Key Beach on Saturday July 7th.

Local Mongolian artist performed Traditional  Mongolian instrument Morin Khuur (Horse Headed Fiddle ).

Mongolian flag was raised during the event.

Image Source : Mongolians in Florida (Facebook Group )

Naadam Update San Francisco


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The Bay Area Mongolian Community Association  has been celebrated the 15th Annual Mongolian National Holiday, Naadam festival at  Golden Gate Park on Saturday July 7th.

The Festival begins with an elaborate introduction ceremony featuring dancers, athletes, horse riders, and musicians. After the ceremony, competition takes place in wrestling, horse racing and archery.

During the Naadam MSNOA’s Nomadic Art Gallery (Ger Gallery ) featuring   artists Alungoo Sergelen, Munkh-Orgil Battsogt, Namuun Enkhbat, Shijir Jargaksaikhan and Suvd-Erdene Amgalanbaatar.

Images source : Mongolian Students Non-Profit Organization in America (MSNOA)

Naadam Update Washington DC


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The Washington DC Area Mongolian Community Association celebrated the Mongolian traditional summer festival Naadam in the nation’s capital on July 8th, 2012  at Barcroft Park in Arlington Virginia.

A large Mongolian flag is being carried around during the opening ceremony of the Arlington Naadam festival.

During the  Naadam  Mongolian traditional music performances and wrestling competition was happening.

Hillary Clinton Congratulates Mongolia


“The brave young people who gathered on the streets in those cold December days in 1989, including a young man who would one day be elected as your new President, helped pave the way for Mongolia to become a dynamic and durable democracy. All over the world that year, we saw a flowering of freedom. People stood up and walls came down,” said Clinton.

“Democracy is never easy – Americans can attest to that. And Mongolia has faced its share of challenges. But through every challenge, the people of Mongolia have pulled together and have risen to the occasion. You have become a model for emerging democracies everywhere. Whenever I visit a country that is struggling to become more democratic, I say what I said when I was in Mongolia: “Let them come to Mongolia!” Because I will never forget my own visit in 1995 — the sweeping beauty of the steppe, the warmth and hospitality of the Mongolian people, and the aspirations of a nation committed to progress after decades of totalitarian rule

“In the years since, Mongolia has consolidated those early achievements and strengthened your democracy. Today even, Mongolian troops are serving around the world as peacekeepers, helping to bring stability to troubled lands.”

“Mongolians and Americans are fighting side by side in Afghanistan against violent extremists who threaten peace-loving people everywhere. We honor the service and sacrifice of your citizens, and we reaffirm the broad partnership between our two nations that is helping build a more peaceful and prosperous world.”

Source :http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/

Hillary Clinton will arrive in Mongolia

Source :http://www.business-mongolia.com

HILLARY R.CLINTON TO VISIT US

Source : http://www.mad-mongolia.com/

Clinton embarks on two-week trip to Asia, Middle East

Source :http://www.foreignpolicy.com/

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s Travel to France, Japan, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Egypt and Israel

Source :http://www.state.gov

Clinton in Mongolia as parties dispute vote results Source:http://www.asiaone.com

In Mongolia, Clinton argues for free markets with democracy in Asia, challenging Chinese model Source :http://www.startribune.com/

Clinton promotes democracy in Mongolia

Source :http://news.yahoo.com/

Carolina Mongol Naadam


Saturday July 14th 4:00 pm Carolina Mongolians will meet at Deep River Campground Park we will camp night out here.

Please bring your camping tent, travel blanket, and air pumped mattress, food and drinks. We all gather and will cook famous Khuushuur.

Sunday July 15th   10:00 am we will celebrate our Greatest Mongol Naadam at Deep River Campground Park.

Program:

  • ·         Wrestling
  • ·         Mongolian Song& Dance
  • ·         Exhibit
  • ·         Chess & Chester Contest
  • ·         Children’s Shagai Game
  • ·         Children’s Race

Questions regarding of event Please Call  Ch.Odonchimeg  at 704-488-9591

Deep River Campground Park web http://www.deeprivercampground.com/

Vancouver Mongol Naadam


An annual Mongolian ‘Naadam‘ takes place July 14th in Jonh Henry Park 3350 Victoria Drive, Vancouver the event is attended by Mongolians from across the country who come together and enjoy wrestling, food and traditional music.

Naadam   Program:

  • Wrestling
  • Children’s Wood Horse Race
  • Building Mongolian Ger
  • Cooking Khorkhog

When: Saturday, July 14th, 2012

Where:  John Hendry Park 3350 Victoria Drive, Vancouver

Time: 10:00 am

Tel: 778-628-6067, 604-657-2499

Washington State Mongol Naadam

Washington State Mongol Naadam


If you can’t make it to Ulan Bator for Mongolia’s National Celebration Naadam, the Mongol   Naadam Festival in Washington State is your next-best option. The event held annually in the Mongolian capital Ulan-baatar celebrates that country’s three main sporting pastimes: Mongolian wrestling, archery and cross-country horse racing. Although the Washington State Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction;. The Mongol Naadam  is not  as bilingual as other festival in the area, so brush up on your conversational Mongolian and bring your appetite for khuushuur, deep-friend pockets of dough stuffed with minced mutton or beef, garlic and onions.

Program Highlights:

  • Opening ceremony
  • Mongolian Concert
  • Mongolian Wrestling
  • Mongolian Costume Contest
  • Children’s Race
  • Children’s Photo Contest
  • Shagai ( uncle bone ) Game

Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2012

Location: New Port Hills Community Church 5833 119th Avenue SE Bellevue, WA 98006

Contact:  206-979-2439, 206-356-7098

Email: merdene5@yahoo.com

 

Mongol Poetry :founding fathers of modern Mongolian literature


Dashdorjiin Natsagdorj Nov 17. 1906 – 1937), was a Mongolian poet, writer, and playwright, and founder of the Mongolian Writer’s Union. He is considered one of the founding fathers of modern Mongolian literature and Mongolia‘s first “classic Socialist” writer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My Native  Land D. Natsagdorj

High stately mountains Khentei, Khangai and Soyon,

Forests and thick-wooded ridges-the beauty of the North,

The Great Gobi desert-the spaces of Menen, Sharga and Nomin,

And the oceans of sand deserts that dominate the South;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The crystal rivers of sacred Kherlen, Onon and Tuul,

Brooks, streams and springs that bring health to all my people,

The blue lakes of Khovsgol, Uvs and Buir-deep and wide,

Rivers and lakes where people and cattle quench their thirst;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The most beautiful rivers of Orkhon, Selenge and Khukhui,

Mountains and passes-the source of metals and stone,

Ancient structures and ruins of towns and fortresses,

Roads and highways running to distant countries;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The high crowns of snow capped mountains shining from atar,

The endless virgin landscape under the clear blue sky,

The noble summits seen standing in the distance,

And the unbounded fields where one’s soul at last finds peace;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The vast land of Khalkha among the deserts and highlands,

Land where we rode along and across from the green days of our youth,

Towering mountain chains where deer and wolf are hunted,

And the finest valleys where splendid horses run;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The land of pure grasses waving in the breeze,

The land of open steppes full of fantastic mirages,

Firm rocks and out-of-reach places where Good men used to meet,

And the ancient ovoos-the cairns to gods and ancestors;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

Land of pasture heavy with grass thin and pure,

Country where all may ride and drive at will,

Country where people live freely in all seasons of the year,

And the land of fertile soil, the five grains that grow,

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The finest mountains-the cradles where our ancestors lie,

Where we grew up and flourished,

The land where five kinds of animals wander in the plains,

And the land saturated with the soul generations of Mongols;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

Land where all is covered with snow and ice in winter,

And the grasses twinkle like glass and crystal,

Land where all is a carpet of flowers in summer,

And full of songbirds from the distant lands of the South;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

The rich land between the Altai and Khingan mountains,

The land where my father and mother lived and blessed for us in their passing,

The land peacefully growing under the golden Sun,

And sparkling forever under the silver Moon;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

Land of my ancestors from the time of the Hun and Sung,

Glorious land where might of the Blue Mongols was felt,

Land that has fitted us since the morning of time,

And the land overspread by Red Banner of New Mongolia;

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

Homeland, known from birth and growing up, is land that we dearly love,

With every invader we turned back at the very gates,

Let us increase the might of our new-born people,

And on our merits build a newer world,

This, this is my native land,

The lovely country – My Mongolia.

Chicago Mongol Naadam 2012


Chicago‘s Mongolian community gathers this year   Sunday 10 am ,July 8th 2012  to celebrate the Mongolian Naadam.

This Festivity is the one of the major celebration on the Mongolians honor of the national holiday of Motherland Mongolia. During the celebration, Mongolians compete in traditional sporting events and competitions that include archery, wrestling, and children’s wood horse racing.

Organizers: Mongol American Association, Chicago Mongolian Community Association, Mongolian Culture Heritage and Wrestler Center

Sunday, July 8th, 2012,

Time: 10:00 am

Location: Busse Woods Forest Preserve Higgins Road, Groves 5-6 Elk Grove Village, IL 60009

Contact: 773-299-0729, 773-954-4212, 773-879-2757

Web: Mongolian American Association    ,  American Mongolian Association ,

Facebook:  American Mongolian Association

About Chicago Mongol Community,

Chicago’s Mongolian community, while geographically dispersed, is an organized and active group with a strong network of mutual assistance. The Mongolian American Association, founded in 1998, aids newcomers from Mongolia, serves as an organizational center for the community, and sponsors social and cultural events such as concerts and speakers. It is affiliated with other Mongolian groups in San Francisco, Denver, and Washington, and by 2001 it boasted 250 members. Some Chicago Mongolians attend cultural events in Bloomington, Indiana, where a small community of Mongols is gathered around the Mongolia Society and Indiana University’s Department of Central Eurasian Studies, the only program in the United States to grant a degree in Mongolian Studies.

Chicago’s Mongolian community gathers each year in  February to celebrate the Mongolian New Year ( White Moon or White Months )

The community also gathers frequently for parties, concerts, speeches, and other social events and such Mongolian cultural activities as a performance by a Mongolian artist or a visit by a Mongolian Buddhist Monk. The Mongolian community maintains ties with Tibetan Buddhists in Chicago, and the groups sometimes celebrate holidays together.

Many of Chicago’s Mongolians are students who came to Chicago to further their education and have chosen to stay in the United States after completing their schooling. Others have come in search of new personal or economic opportunities, and many anticipate their stay to be only temporary. A few Mongolian entrepreneurs have established small businesses, and there is a small professional community. Many Mongolians are well educated but face difficulties on the job market posed by limited English skills and illegal status, forcing them to enter trades and service industries, including rug and carpet cleaning, construction, electrical trades, computers, food service, and custodial work.

NYC Mongol “Naadam” Picnic


NYC Mongol   Naadam Picnic taking place in a Lighthouse park.

 

Where: Light House Park , Roosevelt Island , NY

When: Sunday, July 8th

Time:  10 :00 am

Contact: Lutaa  ,  1-347-891-9241

Special:  Taste and drink Real Mongolian Airag on the Naadam Day

Light House Park is great place to watch the sun set and Manhattan views.

We are celebrating the greatest of all ‘Mongol Naadam’ in  beautiful  Roosevelt Island.

Please bring a blanket (to sit or recline on),

We suggest you to bring home made Mongolian cuisine and beverages .  We will make BBQ ,

If you cannot bring food contribute 20$ for per person to the organizer.

Organizer will provide you food and drinks.

Have a great Naadam Festivity.

Mongol Naadam L.A


Mongol Naadam Los Angeles

Join the Mongolian Naadam Festival presented by Mongolian Community Association   Los Angeles will celebrate its long-awaited return to the 3330 North Lincoln Ave. Altadena, CA 91001 on  July 8 , 2012

Sunday July 8th 2012  at 11 :00 am

Location : 3330 North Lincoln Ave.
Altadena, CA 91001

Event Details : Mongolian Wrestling, Mongolian Song & Dance, Contest who wears most fashionable  Deel ? Mongolian artists join under one roof to bring their local flair to the Naadam.ankle bone shooting contest, archery contest,

Tel :(626) 398-5451

Facebook :

Ticket : 5$  adult , under 18th free

Related articles

Sacramento Mongol Naadam


Sacramento’s Mongolian Community Association Presents :

When: July, 8, 2012

Where: Lew Howard Memorial Park, 7100 Baldwin Dam Rd, Folsom, CA

Time: 11:00 am to 6:00pm

Naadam Program highlights :

 

Contact :  Amraa D (916) 281-1566, J Amra (916) 832-0997, Boloroo (916) 717-7229 Batkhuu (916) 402-6186, Uyanga (916) 365-3622

Eмайл: mcasacto@yahoo.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sacmongols  

 

Mongol Naadam Washington DC Area


Washington DC Mongolian Community Association Presents:
Annual DC-Arlington Mongolian Community summer “Naadam” – a sports and music celebration featuring Mongolian wrestling competition, children’s foot races, traditional songs and dances, and party .
Naadam program
  • Opening Ceremony
  • Mongolian  Tradional songs and dances
  • Greetings from Jargalsaikhan Mongolian State Honored Singer ,”Chinggis Khaan”  Band
  • Mongolian Traditional Wrestling
  •  Official Naadam Celebration Closing  Party    7:00 pm  at Harvest Moon  (7260 Arlington Boulevard  Falls Church, VA 22042 )
Children’s Program
  • Children’s wrestling
  • Children’s foot races
  • Children’s play area ( Moon bounce, face painting, ice cream )
Where:
Barcroft Park in Arlington, VA (4200 S. Four Mile Run Dr. Arlington, VA 22206)
When: July 8, 2012  11:00 am til -5:00pm
Cost:  5$!

The Kalmyks: The Mongols who were left Behind


 

This film was created by Dechen Kelden, a Kalmyk Mongolian who was born and raised in Jackson, NJ. She is a current student at Sarah Lawrence College who took on this project to create an accessible film for young Kalmyks to learn about their history as an Oirat group from the Western Steppes of Mongolia. She is interested in Cultural Preservation studies and working within the Tibetan community based in New York City.
This film is currently a sample and will be expanded upon in the near future with additional interviews and a possible Russian translation.

Any questions or comments please email kalmykmovie@yahoo.com

Directed by Dechen Kelden
Produced and Edited by Tenzin Wangchuk

 

The WildArt Mongolia Expedition

The WildArt Mongolia Expedition


American and Mongolian artists will collaborate and learn from each other, first in the field and then to create an exhibition of art inspired by the trip. There will be venues in both Mongolia and the USA. There will also be a book about the Expedition and the exhibition.

THE ART MISSION

American and Mongolian artists will collaborate and learn from each other, first in the field and then to create an exhibition of art inspired by the trip. There will be venues in both Mongolia and the USA. There will also be a book about the Expedition and the exhibition.

The art exhibition will be something new…not just beautiful finished art to view, but each artist will include at least one major work which will be accompanied by the visual and written story behind it- journal entries, field sketches, photographs, preliminary drawings, studies, models- whatever went into creating the finished piece.
Tahki mare and foal. charcoal pencil on paperTahki mare and foal. charcoal pencil on paper

The goal will be to not only share what we’ve seen, but to show how art is created from a journey like this. And I hope it will enlighten and educate people in both countries about the endangered wildlife and habitats of the Gobi.

My current plan is to debut the exhibition in Ulaanbaatar in July of 2013 to coincide with the national Naadam celebration, which is when many special events happen and visitors are coming in from all over the world. Then schedule the US showing for early fall.

The exhibition will also be permanently viewable online, for those who are unable to attend it in person.

The book will not only be an exhibition catalog of all the art and images of the supporting materials used for the major works, but also the official record of the Expedition, including journal excerpts, stories and also photos taken en route. It will be produced in at least two ways…an e-edition and a print-on-demand “real” book.
Journal entry, Orog Nuur (remote Gobi lake) July 2010Journal entry, Orog Nuur (remote Gobi lake) July 2010

THE CONSERVATION CONNECTION

The Mongols have a deeply embedded land ethic going back over 1000 years (the toes of the traditional herder’s boots are upturned so as not to scuff the earth) and there is substantial grassroots support for conservation. The arrival of extremely large mining projects, upon which Mongolia’s economic future depends, is a source of both hope and great concern. I would like this cross-culture collaboration to provide one way, through the arts, of showing how special the land and wildlife of Mongolia are. We will be visiting three areas with endangered species and habitats at risk. Artists can bring a very special focus and attention to conservation and environmental issues. The WildArt Mongolia Expedition is my way of doing this in one particular part of the world.
Many herders live in the Gobi; we’ll be visiting with them and learning about the challenges they faceMany herders live in the Gobi; we’ll be visiting with them and learning about the challenges they face
One of the trusty Russian fergon vans (photo from my 2006 trip to western Mongolia)One of the trusty Russian fergon vans (photo from my 2006 trip to western Mongolia)

LOGISTICS

Expedition arrangements are being made and staff provided by Nomadic Journeys, with whom I have traveled for five out of my six trips to Mongolia. We’ll be traveling in rugged go-anywhere Russian fergon vans, tent camping for 18 nights under millions of stars, surrounded by peace and quiet that’s almost impossible to find anymore.

The Expedition tent, housing the kitchen and dining area, along with work and relaxation space, will be a traditional Mongol summer tent called a “maikhan”. Donors at or above the $1000 level will have their names on the tent.
An example of a maikhan that I saw in July 2010 at a horsetrainers campAn example of a maikhan that I saw in July 2010 at a horsetrainers camp

I’ll be communicating directly with our donors through the project’s Kickstarter blog. Everyone who is interested can follow the Expedition’s Facebook public page, my own blog and a WildArt Mongolia Board on Pinterest. I will do my best to help you feel what it will be like to travel to an extraordinary place and see the animals, land and people of Mongolia, learn about the art and artists and the conservation challenges.
Bactrian camels, the Gobi, July 2010Bactrian camels, the Gobi, July 2010

PLEASE SUPPORT THE WILDART MONGOLIA EXPEDITION!

Support both art and conservation with one great donation

Funding goal: $5000

Your donation will support not only the three-week Expedition itself, including art materials, field equipment such as the maikhan and our guide, drivers and cook, but also the art exhibition and the WildArt Mongolia Expedition book.
Stone ovoo with a Soyombo, the national symbol of Mongolia, overlooks a Gobi landscape; it is festooned with khadag, blue offering scarvesStone ovoo with a Soyombo, the national symbol of Mongolia, overlooks a Gobi landscape; it is festooned with khadag, blue offering scarves

Thank you for your time and interest in The WildArt Mongolia Expedition!

Please contact me if you have any questions!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/susanfox/the-wildart-mongolia-expedition

—————
Our current list of supporters and sponsors includes:

Jan Wigsten (Nomadic Journeys)

The Arts Council of Mongolia (Ariunna Tserenpil, Executive Director)

Association GOVIIN KHULAN (Anne-Camille Souris, President)

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun (Mongolian-American community and good friend)
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Many thanks to Multicultural Media for the use of “Song of Praise; Altai yin magtagai”.

From the CD recording Mongolia: Living Music of the Steppes, Multicultural Media, available for download from iTunes or as a CD at http://www.worldmusicstore.com
In the Gobi the roads really do go ever on. Please join me on this artistic adventure by donating generously.In the Gobi the roads really do go ever on. Please join me on this artistic adventure by donating generously.

GALLERY:
Journal entry,, July 2010Journal entry,, July 2010
Gers, Hustai National Park,Gers, Hustai National Park,
Rock formations, Baga Gazriin Chuluu, July 2009Rock formations, Baga Gazriin Chuluu, July 2009
That’s the Spot! 18×24″ oil on canvas; takhi photographed at Khomiin Tal, Sept. 2006That’s the Spot! 18×24″ oil on canvas; takhi photographed at Khomiin Tal, Sept. 2006