Tag: expedition

The WildArt Mongolia Expedition

The WildArt Mongolia Expedition


American and Mongolian artists will collaborate and learn from each other, first in the field and then to create an exhibition of art inspired by the trip. There will be venues in both Mongolia and the USA. There will also be a book about the Expedition and the exhibition.

THE ART MISSION

American and Mongolian artists will collaborate and learn from each other, first in the field and then to create an exhibition of art inspired by the trip. There will be venues in both Mongolia and the USA. There will also be a book about the Expedition and the exhibition.

The art exhibition will be something new…not just beautiful finished art to view, but each artist will include at least one major work which will be accompanied by the visual and written story behind it- journal entries, field sketches, photographs, preliminary drawings, studies, models- whatever went into creating the finished piece.
Tahki mare and foal. charcoal pencil on paperTahki mare and foal. charcoal pencil on paper

The goal will be to not only share what we’ve seen, but to show how art is created from a journey like this. And I hope it will enlighten and educate people in both countries about the endangered wildlife and habitats of the Gobi.

My current plan is to debut the exhibition in Ulaanbaatar in July of 2013 to coincide with the national Naadam celebration, which is when many special events happen and visitors are coming in from all over the world. Then schedule the US showing for early fall.

The exhibition will also be permanently viewable online, for those who are unable to attend it in person.

The book will not only be an exhibition catalog of all the art and images of the supporting materials used for the major works, but also the official record of the Expedition, including journal excerpts, stories and also photos taken en route. It will be produced in at least two ways…an e-edition and a print-on-demand “real” book.
Journal entry, Orog Nuur (remote Gobi lake) July 2010Journal entry, Orog Nuur (remote Gobi lake) July 2010

THE CONSERVATION CONNECTION

The Mongols have a deeply embedded land ethic going back over 1000 years (the toes of the traditional herder’s boots are upturned so as not to scuff the earth) and there is substantial grassroots support for conservation. The arrival of extremely large mining projects, upon which Mongolia’s economic future depends, is a source of both hope and great concern. I would like this cross-culture collaboration to provide one way, through the arts, of showing how special the land and wildlife of Mongolia are. We will be visiting three areas with endangered species and habitats at risk. Artists can bring a very special focus and attention to conservation and environmental issues. The WildArt Mongolia Expedition is my way of doing this in one particular part of the world.
Many herders live in the Gobi; we’ll be visiting with them and learning about the challenges they faceMany herders live in the Gobi; we’ll be visiting with them and learning about the challenges they face
One of the trusty Russian fergon vans (photo from my 2006 trip to western Mongolia)One of the trusty Russian fergon vans (photo from my 2006 trip to western Mongolia)

LOGISTICS

Expedition arrangements are being made and staff provided by Nomadic Journeys, with whom I have traveled for five out of my six trips to Mongolia. We’ll be traveling in rugged go-anywhere Russian fergon vans, tent camping for 18 nights under millions of stars, surrounded by peace and quiet that’s almost impossible to find anymore.

The Expedition tent, housing the kitchen and dining area, along with work and relaxation space, will be a traditional Mongol summer tent called a “maikhan”. Donors at or above the $1000 level will have their names on the tent.
An example of a maikhan that I saw in July 2010 at a horsetrainers campAn example of a maikhan that I saw in July 2010 at a horsetrainers camp

I’ll be communicating directly with our donors through the project’s Kickstarter blog. Everyone who is interested can follow the Expedition’s Facebook public page, my own blog and a WildArt Mongolia Board on Pinterest. I will do my best to help you feel what it will be like to travel to an extraordinary place and see the animals, land and people of Mongolia, learn about the art and artists and the conservation challenges.
Bactrian camels, the Gobi, July 2010Bactrian camels, the Gobi, July 2010

PLEASE SUPPORT THE WILDART MONGOLIA EXPEDITION!

Support both art and conservation with one great donation

Funding goal: $5000

Your donation will support not only the three-week Expedition itself, including art materials, field equipment such as the maikhan and our guide, drivers and cook, but also the art exhibition and the WildArt Mongolia Expedition book.
Stone ovoo with a Soyombo, the national symbol of Mongolia, overlooks a Gobi landscape; it is festooned with khadag, blue offering scarvesStone ovoo with a Soyombo, the national symbol of Mongolia, overlooks a Gobi landscape; it is festooned with khadag, blue offering scarves

Thank you for your time and interest in The WildArt Mongolia Expedition!

Please contact me if you have any questions!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/susanfox/the-wildart-mongolia-expedition

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Our current list of supporters and sponsors includes:

Jan Wigsten (Nomadic Journeys)

The Arts Council of Mongolia (Ariunna Tserenpil, Executive Director)

Association GOVIIN KHULAN (Anne-Camille Souris, President)

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun (Mongolian-American community and good friend)
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Many thanks to Multicultural Media for the use of “Song of Praise; Altai yin magtagai”.

From the CD recording Mongolia: Living Music of the Steppes, Multicultural Media, available for download from iTunes or as a CD at http://www.worldmusicstore.com
In the Gobi the roads really do go ever on. Please join me on this artistic adventure by donating generously.In the Gobi the roads really do go ever on. Please join me on this artistic adventure by donating generously.

GALLERY:
Journal entry,, July 2010Journal entry,, July 2010
Gers, Hustai National Park,Gers, Hustai National Park,
Rock formations, Baga Gazriin Chuluu, July 2009Rock formations, Baga Gazriin Chuluu, July 2009
That’s the Spot! 18×24″ oil on canvas; takhi photographed at Khomiin Tal, Sept. 2006That’s the Spot! 18×24″ oil on canvas; takhi photographed at Khomiin Tal, Sept. 2006

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“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C

“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C


Two of the world’s greatest scholars of Mongol history joined theircollaborators NG Emerging Explorer Albert Lin and NG Archaeology Fellow Fred Hiebert in Washington, D.C. last week to discuss their findings on the Valley of the Khans project, to meet with the Mongolian Ambassador to the U.S. Khasbazaryn Bekhbat, and to engage in other conversations around their exciting work.

For the past few years, Albert has been using cutting-edge technology and innovative crowd-sourcing methods to survey the vast openness of Mongolia in search of the area where Genghis Khan was buried. His collaborators have been uncovering the history of the Mongol leader quite a bit longer.

Professors Shagdaryn Bira and Tsogt-Ichiryn Ishdorj are internationally recognized as leaders in Mongol historical research, based on the decades of intense research they have done on the subject, helping to flesh out the story of the famous conqueror, and restoring a knowledge of the rich cultural impacts of his surprisingly modern empire–one that included free trade of goods and ideas, and freedom of religion for all.

Over the years, Bira and Ishdorj’s research has been difficult at times because of the scant clues in the written record and sensitive politics surrounding the legacy of Genghis Khan.

Professor Bira is now Secretary General of the International Association for Mongol Studies, and laureate of the state prize of Mongolia for his scholarly work on the history of the country. In particular, he has won international acclaim for his multifaceted research, including papers comparing modern and Mongol-era versions of globalization and warfare in the Middle East.

Professor Ishdorj is Deputy Director of the International Association for Mongol Studies, as well as Co-Principal Investigator and Mongolian Expedition Leader on the Valley of the Khans project. Together these scholars bring an incredible amount of historic information, cultural perspective, experience, and personal passion to the project.

2012 marks 850 years since the birth of Temujin, the Mongolian man who would unite his neighbors and conquer the known world under the title of Genghis Khan. After decades of research, years of hi-tech data gathering, and months of archaeological analysis, one more chapter in the long history of this man and his legacy is nearing completion. Stay tuned to discover what secret whispers may yet rise from the silent steppes.

Source :http://exploration.nationalgeographic.com/mongolia/content/%E2%80%9Cvalley-khans%E2%80%9D-experts-meet-dc