Tag: politics

His Excellency Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj, President of Mongolia—and former HKS student–will return to the Kennedy School for a September 21st Forum.


 

A Public Address by His Excellency Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj, President of Mongolia

Moderated by David Ellwood, Dean, Harvard Kennedy School

***THIS FORUM EVENT WILL BE TICKETED***
To enter the lottery, click here between Thursday, September

13 at 12:00 PM and Sunday, September 16 at 12:00 PM. Winners will be notified via email on Monday, September 17, and must be available to pick up their tickets on Tuesday, September 18 or Wednesday, September 19 between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm at the Institute of Politics. NO EXCEPTIONS

Enter the Lottery

Start: Thursday, September 13, 2012 – 9:00am
End: Sunday, September 16, 2012 – 12:00am

Contact Information: Please contact the Forum office at 617-495-1380 with any questions.

Notification Information: Winner will notified via email on Monday, Sept 17.

Ticket Pickup Information: Tickets must be to pick up on Tuesday, September 18 or Wednesday, September 19 between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm at the Institute of Politics. NO EXCEPTIONS

 

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Ambassador to Mongolia: Who Is Piper Campbell?


 

The landlocked nation of Mongolia, sandwiched between Russia and China, has long been one of the most remote and least developed places in the world. Its progress toward democracy and economic development since the end of the Cold War will likely be familiar to the career diplomat nominated by President Obama on March 5, 2012, to be the next ambassador to Mongolia.

Piper Anne Wind Campbell, daughter of Gay Campbell and David N. Campbell, a longtime director of Gibraltar Industries, which manufactures and distributes building materials. She was born circa 1966 in Buffalo, New York, and graduated Nichols School, a Buffalo prep school, in 1984. She later said her participation in a summer exchange program to Japan “definitely set me onto this career path in diplomacy.” Campbell earned a B.S. in Foreign Service with a certificate in Asian Studies at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in 1988, and a Masters in Public Administration at the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government in 1999.

She worked briefly for an organization promoting trade between Western New York and Canada prior to joining the Foreign Service in 1989. She began her career with service as a consular and administrative officer at the embassy in Manila, Philippines, followed by a stint as a general services officer providing support to the three U.S. missions in Brussels, Belgium (to the EU, to NATO and to Belgium). Campbell served in the State Department Operations Center from 1994 to 1995, and in the International Organizations Bureau from 1995 to 1996. Detailed to the civil affairs section of a UN peacekeeping mission in the Balkans from 1996 to 1998, Campbell helped the US Agency for International Development (USAID) establish an office in Eastern Slavonia, Croatia, in 1998.

After taking a one-year leave to earn her M.P.A. in 1999, Campbell covered Asian issues and Security Council reform at the U.S. Mission to the UN in New York from 1999 to 2002, and served as counselor for Humanitarian Affairs at the U.S. Mission to the UN in Geneva, Switzerland, from 2002 to 2006. Campbell then served at the Embassy in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, first as deputy chief of mission, starting September 20, 2006, and then as chargé d’affaires ad interim from August 25, 2008, to January 19, 2009.

Back in Washington, Campbell served as chief of staff to Jack Lew, the deputy secretary of state for Management and Resources, until being named consul general at the U.S. Consulate General in Basrah, Iraq, on July 12, 2011.

Piper Campbell has donated $3,200 to Democratic candidates and organizations over the years, with $1,500 going to the 2004 presidential campaign of John Kerry and $700 to the Democratic National Committee in 2004; she also donated $1,000 to Barack Obama’s campaign in 2008, according to OpenSecrets.org. An avid runner, Campbell has competed in marathons and half marathons on three continents.

Source: http://www.allgov.com

 

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab


Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab (1883–1964) was supposedly the last Mongolian Khutugtu, a Lamaist dignitary believed to be an incarnation of Buddha, politician and Mongolian-American scholar. Jamsrangjab was a Khalkha Mongolian and considered the living Buddha among the Mongols. He had strong friendly ties with Dalai Lama and Chiang Kai-shek. Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, respected Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab as his mentor and teacher during his visit to the monastery he founded in New Jersey, USA.

When Jamsrangjab was born to commoners, Bashlu and Gimbeles, in Zagdsambar of Zasagt Khan (in modern Zavkhan Province), there spread mysterious but amazing tales about his born. At his age of 5, Bogd Khan declared Jamsrangjab to be the after-life of the late Diluwa. Jamsrangjab with his parents moved to the capital city Nyislel Khuryee. He studied the philosophy of Buddhism so hard that he was awarded religious dignities at the age of 7 and 21.

In 1916 the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to the south-eastern frontier of Bogd Khaanate Mongolia with the Mongolian general, Khatanbaatar Magsarjav to ease the conflict between the Mongols and the Republic of China. Sometime around C. 1919, he attempted to visit Russia to ask help against the growing influence of China, but he was stopped at the borderline due to incomplete identity documents. Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was also seeking to ask assistance from the United States of America to support the independence of Mongolia.

Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was arrested in 1930 due to the accusation that he was linked with the so-called anti-communist leader, Eregdendagva. He was freed later after he didn’t accept the trial. On 26 February 1931, the Diluwa Khutugtu was sent to China by the government of Mongolian People’s Republic to spy on Banchin Bogd of Inner Mongolia, the Kuomintang, and Japanese spies operating in Inner Mongolia. After he had gone, false rumours about him spread among people. At the time, he didn’t know he would never come back to his homeland again.

While he stayed in Tibet for 3 years, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab was a tutor for the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso.

On 28 June 1932, he met Banchin Bogd and attended the conference about the Khalkha Mongolia in Nanjing. While residing in Inner Mongolia, Diluwa Khutugtu Jamsrangjab established contacts with prince Demchugdongrub of the western Sunid (a Mongol tribe) and his fellow Japanese. The political and military leader of China, Chiang Kai-shek, admired his skills after the two had made good friends in a companion. His safety was in danger in Mongolia when his Mongolian colleagues were purged and executed in outer Mongolia in 1937-39. He fled Mongolia when the leftists attacked on the Buddhist Clergy in 1930s.Since everybody who knew his real mission in China all disappeared or executed, the Diluwa Khutugtu was called falsely political refugee and anti-communist.

After he came to the USA in 1949 with the assistance of Owen Lattimore and fellow professors, Jamsranjab worked at the Johns Hopkins University. There he joined American-British professor Owen Lattimore‘s the Mongolia Project.In New Jersey, he founded a Monastery with Kalmyk American lamas in 1950-1952. He was elected the chief lama of the Monastery there. When he was in the USA, he still worked for the international recognition of Mongolian independence.

He influenced Chan Kai Shek to declare “Mongolia can be a member of the United Nations like other independent nations” in 1960.On 7 April 1965, the last Mongolian Khutugtu, Jamsrangjab, died at the age of 82 in New York. In 1990, the supreme court of Mongolia proved his innocence and abolished all decrees that accused him of false political crimes.

Source : Wikipedia

Source : Mongol American Cultural Association

Source : Dilowa Khutugtu Memorial Foundation

“Orus” means “foreign”


 

The upsurge of anti-Russian and separatist sentiment is marked in several republics of the country

In Russia, settled opinion: The Russian population is oppressed only in the North Caucasus republics. Somehow forgotten that the country is composed of many ethnic regions. Some of them are Russian perhaps worse off than their cousins ​​in the North Caucasus.

The Russian population in Kyzyl – capital of the Republic of Tuva, complains of worsening hostility towards them from the indigenous population. People say that some time has been relatively quiet, and suddenly they took up arms again.

– The relatively calm – does not mean good. On the streets – looks angry and hissing, “Orus” – that word mean aliens – says a resident of Kyzyl, a former school teacher of geography, Anna Kazakova. – It continues for more than 20 years. In the Soviet period, Russian was 50% of the population, now – less than 20%. On the streets periodically appear the inscription “Russian, get out!”

As a result, the outflow of people of Slavic appearance continues.

In the early 1990s, Tuva ASSR (now Republic of Tuva), famous for the fact that its territory in the Soviet Union began the first “Russian pogroms.” Tuvan youth began to smash the rural houses in which lived Russian. Then the stream poured into the cities and towns. On the map of the republic there were real hot spots – Khovu-Aqsa Sosnovka, Bai-Haak. There were riots with national overtones in Kyzyl.

– My family was leaving Tuva twice, because to live where you hate just because you’re Russian, it is impossible. And my family lived there for almost 50 years – says the 18-year-old resident of the town of Krasnoyarsk Territory Kuragino Svetlana Arkhipova. – It’s a shame and what the new place we believe someone else is called Tuvinians. In Tuva I liked. It is very beautiful and unique flora and fauna – you can see the deer, and camels. If it was possible, never went to their homes. But the fear generated by it, remains to this day, I can not fight it.

Writer, blogger Senchina Elizabeth, who also was born and spent her childhood in Tuva, said that in recent years come to their places of fear:

– I tried at every opportunity to visit this rich ancient culture of the region with her husband and children. My family live there.

However, after the streets were Kyzyl roam the crowd of angry, slovenly-dressed people, decided that the home is not worth visiting. They came from rural areas, unemployed and hungry. Attack those who do not like them. One gets the impression that they were hit by a certain force.

A friend of mine who lives in this city at 18 o’clock went to the store. The crowd beat him cruelly. Another friend of mine said that even in the summer after 17 hours on the street is better not to show up – can strongly beat or rape.

“SP”: – They come in a tourist in Tuva?

– Especially love these places artists and musicians. A magnificent, full of talent edge. But recently, the flow of tourists has declined significantly. Recently spoke with a poet has been in Tuva, he lived in a yurt, a lot of contact with the locals. The poet said, “survived by a miracle. They are quick-tempered, there is again something started. ”

Yesterday called out an acquaintance said that Tuva is becoming more Chinese.

A resident of Kyzyl Irina Portnov said: “During the restructuring of all life was hard in Tuva. People had to put the blame on someone. We decided to dump the representatives of other nationalities. They fought fiercely, with deafening screams. ”

– Nationalism, we, of course, is present but no longer has those terrible shape in the late 1980s – early 1990s – said a resident of Kyzyl Anna Morozova. – I tuvinka half and half Russian. In Soviet times, the first heads of government structures have been Tuva, and closure – only Russian. Last had more rights and powers. Until now, residents are Russian believe that indigenous people rescued from tuberculosis and syphilis. But the village dying of famine and plague, and not just from these diseases.

Judging by the stories of Russian citizens of the republic of Kalmykia, their position is almost indistinguishable from their peers in distress from Tuva.

– Began constant collision with a young Kalmyk persons of Slavic nationalities, with the attacking mob, beaten with cruelty, using rebar and lead clubs – says a resident of the capital – city of Elista, Zoe, who asked not to call her name. – They create a group of Kalmyk people aged 17-18 years, who attacked a crowd of several dozen people on lonely passers-by or on two or three people of Slavic appearance. Sometimes, beaten to death – the stakes.

– There is a mass exodus from the Kalmyk steppe. They come mainly in Elista, where unemployment is a long time ago. Unable to find work, they drink and rob. Russian killed only because they – Russian – says a resident of the Kalmyk capital Anton Perevalov.

On this occasion, the State Duma deputy Nikolai Kuryanovich sent requests to the Prosecutor General’s Office and the FSB. However, according to Russian residents of Elista, the situation has not changed.

– You are a complete heresy! I – radical elistinets, never heard about this, – shouted into the phone the head of the Office of Communications and Information Policy of the Government of the Republic of Kalmykia, Nikolai Sandzhiev. – I will not talk about it.

Novosibirsk analyst George Polyankin says that in the Republic of Buryatia this does not come up, but the Nationalists there claimed by Russian:

– Burnatsisty – well-established symbol of the Buryat nationalist stand on the positions of separatism and Russophobia.

Burnatsisty believe Russian colonialists seized their territory. Part burnatsistov ascribes Russian genocide and the slave trade.

Russia today they believe the state, standing on the oppression of minority positions in favor of Russian. Russian media called burnatsisty chauvinistic views, therefore, actively sympathetic to the North Caucasian separatists and Muslim ethnic organized crime groups.

Also burnatsisty accused of destroying Russian Buryat culture: the withering away of the language, the erosion of cultural traditions, and isolation from the Mongol world.

They are very popular among the Buryats. The people of Slavic appearance live there in a constant state of anxiety. In this country prospers nationalism household: for all inconveniences blamed Russian.

 

Source :http://svpressa.ru/society/article/56683/

 

Celebrating Dalai Lama’s Birthday Indiana Bloomington

Celebrating Dalai Lama’s Birthday Indiana Bloomington


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come celebrate His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s birthday with us!

July 7 th

10 :00 am  til 5:00 pm  at Tibetian Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center )

The TMBCC was founded in Bloomington, Indiana by Thubten Jigme Norbu, brother of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet. Under the leadership of Venerable Arjia Rinpoche, it nurtures and preserves the cultures of Tibet and Mongolia.

Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center

Address :3655 S.Snoddy Rd, Bloomington, IN, 47401

Tel:# 812-336-6807

Website : http://tmbcc.net/

Facebook :http://www.facebook.com/TMBCC

How to get there ?

We are located two miles south of the College Mall. From College Mall Road which becomes Sare road), continue south to Rogers Road. At the flashing red ligh. Turn left on Rogers Road and go one half-mile to Snoddy Road. The TMBCC is one mile down on the left.

From Nashville on SR 46, turn left on Smith Road until you come to Snoddy Road. Coming south on SR 37, take the SR 45/46 Bloomington exit left which becomes College Mall and Sare Roads. Coming north on SR 37, take the Tapp Road exit right; the name changes to Country Club drive; that becomes Winslow Road, and finally becomes Rogers Road after 4 miles.

 

“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C

“Valley of the Khans”Experst Meet in D.C


Two of the world’s greatest scholars of Mongol history joined theircollaborators NG Emerging Explorer Albert Lin and NG Archaeology Fellow Fred Hiebert in Washington, D.C. last week to discuss their findings on the Valley of the Khans project, to meet with the Mongolian Ambassador to the U.S. Khasbazaryn Bekhbat, and to engage in other conversations around their exciting work.

For the past few years, Albert has been using cutting-edge technology and innovative crowd-sourcing methods to survey the vast openness of Mongolia in search of the area where Genghis Khan was buried. His collaborators have been uncovering the history of the Mongol leader quite a bit longer.

Professors Shagdaryn Bira and Tsogt-Ichiryn Ishdorj are internationally recognized as leaders in Mongol historical research, based on the decades of intense research they have done on the subject, helping to flesh out the story of the famous conqueror, and restoring a knowledge of the rich cultural impacts of his surprisingly modern empire–one that included free trade of goods and ideas, and freedom of religion for all.

Over the years, Bira and Ishdorj’s research has been difficult at times because of the scant clues in the written record and sensitive politics surrounding the legacy of Genghis Khan.

Professor Bira is now Secretary General of the International Association for Mongol Studies, and laureate of the state prize of Mongolia for his scholarly work on the history of the country. In particular, he has won international acclaim for his multifaceted research, including papers comparing modern and Mongol-era versions of globalization and warfare in the Middle East.

Professor Ishdorj is Deputy Director of the International Association for Mongol Studies, as well as Co-Principal Investigator and Mongolian Expedition Leader on the Valley of the Khans project. Together these scholars bring an incredible amount of historic information, cultural perspective, experience, and personal passion to the project.

2012 marks 850 years since the birth of Temujin, the Mongolian man who would unite his neighbors and conquer the known world under the title of Genghis Khan. After decades of research, years of hi-tech data gathering, and months of archaeological analysis, one more chapter in the long history of this man and his legacy is nearing completion. Stay tuned to discover what secret whispers may yet rise from the silent steppes.

Source :http://exploration.nationalgeographic.com/mongolia/content/%E2%80%9Cvalley-khans%E2%80%9D-experts-meet-dc

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent

2012 BUDDHISM RETREAT FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent


Workshop on Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhist Culture

The three-day Buddhism Retreat for university students of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Mongolian descent will be held at the Garrison Institute,Garrison,NY from July 5 to 7, 2012.   The Garrison Institute is housed in a beautifully renovated 77,000 square foot former Capuchin monastery with comfortable accommodations and wonderful meeting facilities. Located one hour north of New York City on the banks of the Hudson River, surrounded by forest and fields, it offers a unique, authentic setting for ideal retreats.

The retreat is hosted by Office of Tibet, NY and the Institute of Tibetan Classics, Montreal and it is being presented by the Dalai Lama Trust. It is supported by the Camellia Foundation.

The resource persons for the retreat include Geshe Thupten Jinpa, principal English translator to His Holiness the Dalai Lama; Gelek Rinpoche, a Tibetan spiritual master and founder of Jewel Heart Centers headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan; Geshe Damdul Namgyal, a former Religious Assistant to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and currently associated with the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative of the Emory University, Alanta; Lama Pema Wangdak, a founder of the Vikramasila Foundation and the Palden Sakya Centers; and several others.

The retreat is open to students that are about to enter, currently enrolled or recently graduated from college/university.

Surrounding view from the Garrison Institute

The retreat is free, but the participants have to bear their own travel expenses. The host organizations will meet the expenses of the participants’ board and accommodation at the Garrison Institute. The participants are expected to check in at the Garrison Institute on the evening of July 4 and check-out from the institute after the retreat on July 8.

A total of 100 participants will be accepted on first come, first serve basis. Those interested to participate in the retreat should send the following information to sign up for the retreat to Tsewang Phuntso at phuntso@igc.org

A detail curriculum of the retreat will be circulated shortly.

Registration Information
Name
Address
College/University
Major/Focus of study
Email address (personal and not university address)
Phone:
Please specify in the email if you are recent graduate

http://tibetoffice.org/media-press/events/2012-buddhism-retreat-for-tibetan-university-students-registration-call

The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture

The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture


By: Salman Heydari
           
The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture was developed to increase awareness of the rich history and cultural heritage of the Hazara people from Afghanistan, who now live throughout the world. The Hazara ethnic group, the third largest in Afghanistan, is a culture that has survived despite genocide and decades of political oppression at the hands of the Taliban and other Afghan regimes.
            The lecture and exhibit are the work of Mohammed Rezaee, who emigrated to the U.S. eight years ago.  He now lives in metro Atlanta with his wife and family.  He has delivered the lecture several times in the Atlanta area, at the same time showing photographs (taken by professional photojournalists) of Hazara life, using computer technology to show the photos in large-scale, living color.
            More than hundred Americans, including high level officials, attended the opening on January 17, 2012, an evening reception at which the Americans were served Hazaragi foods, (Bosragh and Pirki) prepared by Mr. Rezaee’s wife.   They were also invited to a display of Hazaragi clothes.
            After the gallery reception Mr. Rezaee gave a lecture about the history of Hazaras and the current conditions of the Hazara people. Also, a brief history of Hazaras, which was written by a famous Hazara historian, Haji Kazim Yazdani, was distributed to those in attendance in a brochure format.
            There was a separate opening for Afghans. Mr. Baisr Dolatabadi, Mr. Abdul Khaliq Hazara, and Ishaq Mohammadi gave lectures—via Skype—about Hazaras’ history, culture, customs, and the current condition of the Hazara people.
            The on-going photo exhibit features works of Hazara photojournalists Hafize Besharat, Muzafer Ali, Barat Ali Batoor, Sajad Goher and Mohammad Rezaee, which had never been seen before in the United States. The photo exhibit (large framed copies of the photographs) was on display at Tucker Public Library, metro Atlanta, until March 28, 2012. Many Americans visited the photo exhibition.
            The lecture-exhibit will again be presented, at no cost, on June 14, 2012.   Georgia Perimeter College, which is one of the largest of Georgia’s institutions, will host the presentation at their Dunwoody Campus. The photo exhibit will be open to the public through July 13, 2012.
 You are cordially invited to attend the lecture for the opening of the photography exhibit, on Jun 14, 2012. The lecture will include a food tasting, a display of traditional clothing items, and discussion of the history and unique culture of the Hazara people.

The organizer of The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture’s Facebook page,
His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama “The Essence of Buddhism”

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama “The Essence of Buddhism”


A teaching and Blessing by

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama

” The Essence  of Buddhism”

Hosted by :

The Kalmyk Three Jewels Foundation & The Tibetan Community of New York & New Jersey

Lincoln Center , NY

October 21,2012

1:30-3:30 pm

Tickets will go on sale later this year Details of sponsorship packages will be sent out as soon as they are available

Please Contact : dalailamalincolncenter@gmail.com with any questions

http://www.dalailamalincolncenter.com