Tag: mongolian

Farewell, MONGOLIA


As my posting in Mongolia draws to a close, I want to publicly thank Mongolians living across the country – from Dornod to Bayan Ulgii – for their interest, hospitality and support.

I will remember many things about Mongolia.  But, perhaps more than anything, I will remember the vastness of the steppe; the beauty of the mountains; the brilliance of the night stars; and the personal kindnesses extended by so many Mongolians at every step of the way.  A sense for the fascinating history and unique culture of this great country will also linger, long after my formal assignment in Mongolia concludes.

In fact, it has been my privilege to live and work in Mongolia twice – first as USAID country director (2001-2004) and now as Ambassador (2009-2012).  On each occasion, I was able to visit all 21 of Mongolia’s provinces.

My wife Fiona shares my deep appreciation for Mongolia and our three children Iain, Cameron and Catriona have spent much of their early childhoods in this country, carrying with them memories that will last a lifetime.  As a family, we have slept in gers and camped beside lakes and rivers in every corner of this spacious and beautiful land.  We have also learned from the many Mongolians we have met, at times sharing in their customs, celebrations and rich traditions.

Earlier this month, we had the unforgettable opportunity to welcome Secretary of State Clinton to Mongolia, a historic visit in which she met with President Elbegdorj, Prime Minister Batbold and Foreign Minister Zandanshatar and also addressed the Executive Meeting of the Community of Democracies as well as the International Women’s Leadership Forum.

Looking back over the entire span of three years, I am especially gratified by the many concrete ways in which the ties between the United States and Mongolia have become both deeper and stronger:

— In 2009, the US Embassy sponsored three Fulbright scholarships for higher education in the United States; for 2011, the figure reached sixteen, including ten scholars funded by the Government of Mongolia.  At this point, at least 1,200 and perhaps as many as 2,500 Mongolians are studying in the United States.

— Recently, the first Mongolian was admitted to the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point.  Over the past few years, many more Mongolians have received private scholarships to attend leading American universities including Harvard, Stanford and Yale.

— In 2009, US exports to Mongolia barely reached $40 million; for 2011, the figure surpassed $313 million.  Over the past three years, General Electric opened an office in Ulaanbaatar; Bloomberg Television established a presence in Mongolia; Wagner-Asia launched branch offices in Darkhan and Khan Bogd; and Mongolia signaled its intent to move its national airline MIAT toward an all-Boeing fleet.  Major American companies such as Peabody are now poised to make a highly positive mark, joining with Mongolian partners to bring high safety standards, the latest technology and a long-term commitment to developing Mongolia’s mineral sector in a way that is ethical and reflects concern for the environment.

— In April 2010, our Embassy received the first ever “Green Embassy of the Year Award” from the US Department of State, in recognition of our attention to environmental concerns.

— In June 2010, Mongolia was one of the first four countries world-wide to receive a large grant under the Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation, sponsored by the US Department of State — $585,000 to help preserve and protect Amarbayasgalant Monastery, located in a beautiful valley in Selenge aimag, five hours north of Ulaanbaatar.

— In June 2010, the Los Angeles based band Ozomatli visited Mongolia, attracting some 20,000 Mongolians to hear their music in Sukhbaatar Square.  To this day, the Ozomatli concert remains the single largest cultural event that the United States Embassy has ever sponsored in Mongolia.

— In November 2010, we welcomed into our home a group of disabled Mongolians representing the Mongolian NGO Wind Bird, returning from a memorable trip to discuss disability issues in the United States.  Throughout my tenure, Fiona and I have sought to ensure the involvement of disabled Mongolians across the full range of Embassy-sponsored programs in Mongolia.

— In March 2011, it was my privilege to travel to Kabul to spend several days with the Mongolian soldiers serving there.  The emergence of Mongolia as a “peacekeeping nation” is a remarkable development, most recently resulting in the deployment of the first of what will eventually be 850 Mongolian soldiers serving in the world’s newest nation, South Sudan.

— In April 2011, the Embassy launched a $25 million renovation project, symbolizing our continued and enduring commitment to partnering with Mongolia in a wide range of areas.

— In June 2011, President Elbegdorj met with President Obama in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC.  During this same visit, he also opened Mongolia’s first Consulate in San Francisco.

— In August 2011, Vice President Biden visited Mongolia – the first such visit by a sitting American Vice President in 67 years.  This visit also inaugurated our Embassy use of Facebook and Twitter.

— In January 2012, the Mongolian National Archives presented to me – which I in turn presented to our Library of Congress in Washington, DC – a facsimile copy of the travel pass given in 1862 to a “Mr. Felosi,” marking the 150th anniversary of what was very possibly the first American citizen to ever visit Mongolia.

— In June 2012, the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) in Mongolia received the MCC’s first ever “Country Commitment Award”, given in part to recognize the special attention that MCA has paid to gender concerns.

Over the past year, Americans and Mongolians have together celebrated several notable anniversaries, including the 20th anniversary of Peace Corps in Mongolia; the 20th anniversary of USAID in Mongolia; and the 25th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between our two countries.

In celebrating that 25th anniversary of diplomatic ties, I am often reminded of a statement made many decades ago by an American diplomat named A.W. Ferrin.  Serving as a commercial officer in Peking, he argued in as early as 1918 that the United States should establish a diplomatic presence in Urga, as Ulaanbaatar was then known.  According to his message back to Washington, if the US were to open such an office, it would become “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country”.

Throughout my three-year tenure in Mongolia, I have sought every day to fulfill the promise of that early aspiration – to indeed do my best to ensure that, as a proud partner and friendly third neighbor, the United States would indeed prove to be “a most helpful factor in the development of a wonderful country.”

Thank you once again for the many kindnesses that we have received over these last three years.  As a family, we wish the people and country of Mongolia every success in the years ahead.  We also sincerely hope that relations between the United States and Mongolia will continue to prosper.

Ambassador Jonathan Addleton

Source: http://english.news.mn/content/114436.shtml

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In New York, will be handing out free buuz



This promotional campaign decided to spend the Buryats living permanently in America.

“For the first time in New York today began offering in the U.S. buuzy Mish Mash Cafe at 1103 King Highway. Come! Please support the American initiative Buryats, “- this message has appeared recently in social networks.

Author ads Rygzhita Baldanova not the first time noted on the Internet with a creative message. About a month ago, she created a facebook group called “Pedigree drill.” Rygzhita has proposed a scheme by which to recover their ancestral roots. Hundreds of people responded, many managed to get information about their ancestors sometimes from unexpected sources. Including myself Rygzhita by a group within the first two weeks, regained his paternal ancestry to 22 elbows.

– Currently, there are changes in the Buryat community at the federal level, the Buryat abolished territorial units – said about his interest in the topic of genealogy Rygzhita. – Also, migration is a drill, we will gradually dissolve in the western culture and forgetting the traditions of ancestors, losing their roots. It’s very sad. And so it is very important not to lose identity and traditions.

Buuz preparing to do, she decided, too, especially for patriotic reasons. Rygzhita medical profession, the public has to do with diet as long as her partner, with whom she works on many fronts in the medical field, has acquired a few months ago cafe.

– I took advantage of this and suggested that the Buryat buzy – says Rygzhita. – In New York, enough representatives of Mongolian and Buryat peoples. The project is interesting to me just because they wanted to Buryats were the first in New York among the Mongolian diaspora …

According Rygzhity, the project is mainly aimed at the Mongolian, including the drill. However, during the promotion will be free buuzy offered to all comers. Rygzhite, of course, wants the project to justify itself, and in commercial terms.

After buuzy promotions will be made to order, there are several drill, expressed a desire to do it. Their cost is inexpensive – $ 5 per dose of 5 buuz. This, incidentally, at the Ulan-Ude prices poses, but by American standards at all cheap.

Tatiana ZHIMBUEVA

In the photo: Mish Mash Cafe in New York.

Courtesy Rygzhitoy Baldanova.

Source: http://bis-bur.ru/index.php?option=com_flexicontent&view=items&cid=85&id=1436

Naadam Update Florida


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The Florida Mongolian Community   has been celebrated Mongolian National Holiday, Naadam  Picnic  at  Sand Key Beach on Saturday July 7th.

Local Mongolian artist performed Traditional  Mongolian instrument Morin Khuur (Horse Headed Fiddle ).

Mongolian flag was raised during the event.

Image Source : Mongolians in Florida (Facebook Group )

Vancouver Mongol Naadam


An annual Mongolian ‘Naadam‘ takes place July 14th in Jonh Henry Park 3350 Victoria Drive, Vancouver the event is attended by Mongolians from across the country who come together and enjoy wrestling, food and traditional music.

Naadam   Program:

  • Wrestling
  • Children’s Wood Horse Race
  • Building Mongolian Ger
  • Cooking Khorkhog

When: Saturday, July 14th, 2012

Where:  John Hendry Park 3350 Victoria Drive, Vancouver

Time: 10:00 am

Tel: 778-628-6067, 604-657-2499

Mongolia’s Dilemma: Who Gets The Water?

Mongolia’s Dilemma: Who Gets The Water?


by

May 22, 2012

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation’s distinctive, nomadic identity.

Second of four parts

The Central Asian nation of Mongolia has untold riches in copper, coal and gold, which could help many of its nearly 3 million people — more than one-third of whom live in poverty.

But mining is also reshaping Mongolia’s landscape and nomadic culture. Camel and goat herders worry that new mega-mines will siphon off precious water in an area that’s already suffering from the effects of climate change.

Mijiddorj Ayur, whose livestock graze near the Oyu Tolgoi mine, tends camels in a stretch of Mongolia’s South Gobi province that’s a moonscape of sand and gravel. He relies on the animals for meat, wool and milk, and they rely on hand-pumped well water to survive.

“When we come to the well, we can see the level of the well water is 8 inches lower than it used to be,” says Mijiddorj, 76, who wears a golden, double-breasted robe called a deel and a brimmed felt hat.

Mijiddorj — Mongolians typically go by one name — says the well water has dropped in the last several years because of lower rainfall, while the grasslands are shrinking because of rising temperatures from climate change.

Now, he sees another potential threat: Oyu Tolgoi, a giant mine that will need huge amounts of water to process copper ore. The company has already drilled test wells near where Mijiddorj’s camels drink.

“My greatest fear is we won’t have water,” he says. “I don’t care about the gold or the copper, I’m just afraid there won’t be water.”

My greatest fear is we won’t have water. I don’t care about the gold or the copper, I’m just afraid there won’t be water.

– Mijiddorj Ayur, whose livestock graze near Oyu Tolgoi mine

Threats To Traditional Herding

It’s a worry echoing across South Gobi province, a mix of rocky desert and grassland where drought periodically wipes out herds. It’s home to thousands of herders and about a million head of livestock.

Officials from Oyu Tolgoi, which has been under construction since mid-2010, say the mine will draw water from a deep aquifer that won’t affect wells like Mijiddorj’s. But he and other herders are suspicious.

They have already felt mining’s impact. Herders say mine trucks hit their animals and kick up dust that chokes pastureland. Indeed, almost all the roads in the area are dirt, and trucks trail plumes of dust so huge they look like they’re on fire.

A herder named Chuluunbaatar says he’s lost about 40 percent of the pastureland he uses, as well as many sheep, goats and camels, since Oyu Tolgoi built a nearby road a year and a half ago.

Herder Mijiddorj Ayur, 76, stands outside his home in South Gobi, Mongolia. He worries about the effects a local mine will have on his livelihood.

EnlargeJohn W. Poole/NPRHerder Mijiddorj Ayur, 76, stands outside his home in South Gobi, Mongolia. He worries about the effects a local mine will have on his livelihood.

“Some of them died, because they were exhausted because there was not enough pasture,” he says. He adds that he had to kill some dying animals and sell their meat in order to salvage some of their value.

A Question Of Compensation

Oyu Tolgoi — which means “Turquoise Hill” in Mongolian, a name that refers to the color copper turns when it’s exposed to oxygen — is owned by global mining giant Rio Tinto and Canada’s Ivanhoe Mines, as well as the Mongolian government.

The mine has offered herders compensation, including simple jobs helping livestock cross roads, in a country where per capita GDP is about $2,500, according to the Mongolia government.

Many herders have signed compensation agreements, but Myagmardorj Mijiddorj, a local government official, says some herders already working for the company complain of coercion.

“Oyu Tolgoi employs people for maybe $230 a month,” says Myagmardorj. “When the people are reluctant to sign the contract, they say: ‘You are an employee and you have to sign it or there will be measures.'”

The biggest risk we face is that we will be seen to be a land of plenty in a sea of stress.

– Mark Newby, Oyu Tolgoi water adviser

In other words, Myagmardorj says, they’ll be out of a job.

“We never forced them to sign the agreement,” says Suugie Gonchigjantsan, who manages community relations for Oyu Tolgoi.

She denies that the company has pressured anyone and says the complaints are just a negotiating tactic.

“Some of the individuals really want to get more, more and more,” Suugie says.

The company’s compensation scheme is modest. One option, for instance, would provide an affected family with a $3,800 scholarship to put a child through college. In its first full year of operation, Oyu Tolgoi could produce about $900 million worth of gold and copper, according to company statistics.

So, why not give herders more money and quiet them down?

Suugie rules that option out. Any solution, she says, “has to be equal.”

Map of Mongolia's Oyu Tolgoi Mine

Credit: Nelson Hsu/NPR

Growing Competition For Water

Mark Newby, Oyu Tolgoi’s principal adviser for water resources, says the company has monitored more than 100 herder wells in the area for years.

He says Oyu Tolgoi has found no connection between the herder wells, which go down as far as 30 feet, and the aquifer the mine will draw from, which begins about 150 feet below the surface.

At full capacity, the mine will pump about 180 gallons per second from the aquifer. If herders’ wells are affected — which Newby says he seriously doubts — Oyu Tolgoi says it will fix the problem.

“In the very worst case, it would require the delivery of treated water to the herder,” he says. “For a typical herd, that would require up to a truckload a day.”

Newby says a bigger challenge may be managing perceptions and helping herders already struggling for water.

“The biggest risk we face is that we will be seen to be a land of plenty in a sea of stress,” he says.

John W. Poole/NPR

Once a wetland — one of the very few in the Gobi — this area has been drying up over the past several years, thanks to rising temperatures and lower rainfall.

Competition for water continues to grow across South Gobi province, which is about the size of Wisconsin. Outside the provincial capital of Dalanzadgad, local officials are at odds with Mongolia’s central government and a nearby coal mine.

Two years ago, local officials designated a nearby seasonal lake as a protected area. Last year, the central government reversed the decision and said the coal mine could pump out water underneath the lake.

“That is the only fresh water source of this whole area,” says Munkhjargal Batdorj, a local official. Munkhjargal says the central government has a stake in the mine — which like Oyu Tolgoi also has foreign ownership — and appears to be pursuing its own interests.

“The government is probably reversing its own decision because it’s just not caring about the people,” she says. “I think it’s a rotten decision.”

Who Benefits The Most?

Mining contributes heavily to both local and central government budgets, and residents complain that officials sometimes use the money to enrich themselves.

Rashboud Tumen, a grocer in Dalanzadgad, cites one local representative in particular.

He says the official had a Russian jeep and traded it in for a Toyota Land Cruiser 80. Then, a few months later, he traded that in for a Land Cruiser 105 — which an incredulous Rashboud notes costs $53,000.

More than 30 percent of Mongolians live on $1.25 a day.

“Animals die in the drought,” he says. “You could have bought livestock for 10 families. You could have done so much good with that $53,000. What does a Land Cruiser 105 do for local people? Nothing.”

As mines begin to pump more water from the Gobi, herders will be watching their wells and waiting. And as profits continue to pour into mineral companies, some Mongolians will continue to wonder what is in it for them.

http://www.npr.org/2012/05/22/152698675/mongolias-dilemma-who-gets-the-water

American Mongolian 12th Annual Basketball Championship Chicago

American Mongolian 12th Annual Basketball Championship Chicago


American Mongolian 12th Annual Basketball Championship June 16 &17

1st place award $1,000. MEN

When:June 16th and 17th

Where :2195 N. Hicks rd, Palatine, IL 60074

Contact :773-426-2130, 773-490-0019

Email:nyambaa26@gmail.com

Information in Mongolian 

About me

About me


My name is Byambakhuu Darinchuluun
I‘m a native Mongolian speaker living in Flushing, New York. I have been teaching Mongolian Language and Culture for over 5 years.
I am proficient in English and Mongolian.
I graduated from the National State University in Ulaanbaatar Mongolia.I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Cultural Anthropology and History.My teaching style is very open. I let my students know what their weaknesses are and I closely work with them until they improve. I employ different techniques, depending on a student’s ability and his/her difficult areas.
My teaching style is very open. I let my students know what their weaknesses are and I closely work with them until they improve. I employ different techniques, depending on a student’s ability and his/her difficult areas.
 I have taught in elementary, middle and high school. Many of my students are adults. I believe that people are “never too old to learn!”
I look forward to getting to know you and helping you improve your Mongolian!