Tag: Kalmyk

NYC Mongol Naadam Celebration


Naadam rider 1
Naadam rider 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival.
English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

NYC Mongol Naadam

 

 

 

Please join us on Saturday July 6th for Mongol Heritage
Foundation’s Naadam Celebration.

Mongol Heritage Foundation & NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project in the NYC is holding First annual Naadam celebration in near Bethesda Fountain ,Central Park , New York. The celebration will be opened by H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations.

The NYC Mongols celebration “Naadam” 2013 will take place on Saturday July 6th from 11:00am – 7:00 pm at the west side of the “Bethesda Fountain” Central Park where the Mongol tradition of “Naadam” will happen among the all Mongol people who live in the greater New York area.

This Festivity is the one of the major celebration on the Mongols honor of the national holiday of Motherland Mongolia. During the celebration, Mongolians compete in traditional sporting events and competitions that include , wrestling, and children’s wood horse racing.
In 2010, Naadam was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

We encourage you to invite your friends and family to this exciting and interesting event where the New York Area Mongols will join together in a traditional celebration.

All of the Mongols including Buryats, Kalmyks, Hazaras ,Tuvans and Inner Mongolians are join in the celebration.

Everyone who is interested in Mongolia and Mongol Culture is invited; people who are interested in Mongolia and the Mongolian Culture such as Americans who have lived and worked in Mongolia through the Peace Corps will attend.

Where: The Bethesda Fountain, Central Park is one of the largest fountains in New York, measuring twenty-six feet high by ninety-six feet wide.It is one of the most well known fountains in the world.This neoclassical sculpture, also known as Angel of the Waters, features an eight-foot bronze angel who stands above four small cherubim representing health, purity, temperance, and peace.

Location: Bethesda Fountain, Central Park
The Mall, New York, NY 10024

When: Saturday, July 6,
Time: 11 :00 am till 7:00 pm

Opening Welcome, H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations

Greetings
Inner Mongolian Community Mr. Hasar Ayush
Kalmyk Community Ms. Kermen
Buryat Community Ms. Tsengiyev
Hazara Community Liquate Ali
Kalmyk Project NYC
Mongolian Ambulance Project
Wild Art Mongolia 2013 Expedition

The President of the Mongol Heritage Foundation Byambakhuu Darinchuluun will go over the agenda of the event

Program Highlights

Wrestling
Children’s Wood Horse Race
Children’s Shagai (ankle bone ) Game

Featuring:

Mongolian Song
Kalmyk Song
Buryat Song
Tsakhar song,
Hazara Song
Yokhor “Circle ” dancing

Contest
“I am mongol ” painting contest
The Best Traditional Mongolian male, female, and child’s clothing contest
Mongolian singing contest
Closing Ceremony Singing all Mongols .National Song (Warm Hear ted Land )

Main Organizers:
Mongol Heritage Foundation and NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project NYC,

Supporting Organizations:

Permanent Mission of Mongolia to United Nations,
Hazara Organization Progress and Equality
Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center

Sponsor:
Mongol American Cultural Association, Advanced Accounting, Sign. Inc and the NYC Inner Mongolian , Kalmyk, Hazara, Buryat, Tuva , Mongolian community

Media:
Writer, journalist , Louie Lazar
http://www.louielazar.com/

Asian Fusion Magazine , General Editor, Rick Lin
http://www.asianfusion-mag.com/

Get involved :You’ll meet new Mongol people, have fun and support a great event.

Let Mongol Culture Alive in New York City Tri-state Area

Volunteering, Partner and Sponsor Call :

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun Mongolia (347) 437-9265,
Dawood Changazi Hazara (347) 400-8591,
Kermen Dyumkeeva Kalmyk (347) 221-9123
Enkhbat Toochig Inner Mongolia (917)698-4367

Please bring food to share and your beverages to drink. There will be Mongolian food and games to play.

Boortsog, suutei tsai, byaslag and plates, napkins, silverware, etc. will be provided by the Mongol Heritage Foundation .

What to expect:
some ideas on what to expect and what you should do when you attend during Naadam Event.

Children’s Wooden Hobby Horse Rising
Although the NYC Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction.

Naadam Dress

Mongol Malgai , Mongol Deel, Khantaaz,

Wrestling
Mongolian traditional wrestling is an untimed competition in which wrestlers lose if they touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet or hand. When picking pairs, the wrestler with the greatest fame has the privilege to choose his own opponent. Wrestlers wear two-piece costumes consisting of a tight shoulder vest (zodog) and shorts (shuudag). Only men are allowed to participate.Each wrestler has an “encourager” called a zasuul. The zasuul sings a song of praise for the winning wrestler after rounds 3, 5, and 7.
Winners of the 7th or 8th stage earn the title of zaan, “elephant”. The winner of the 9th or 10th stage, is called arslan, “lion”. In the final competition, all the “zasuuls” drop in the wake of each wrestler as they take steps toward each other. Two time arslans are called the titans / giants, or avraga.

Shagai
Shagai games are especially popular during the Mongolian summer holiday of Naadam. In shagai dice, the rolled shagai generally land on one of four sides: horse, camel, sheep or goat.
Mongolians still exchange shagai today as tokens of friendship. The shagai may be kept in a little pouch.A large variety of traditional Mongolian games are played using the shagai pieces. Depending on the game, the anklebones may be tossed like dice, flicked like marbles, shot at with arrows, caught in the hands, or simply collected according to the roll of a die. In many games, the side on which a tossed piece lands (horse, sheep, camel, or goat) is significant.

Khadag
Typically it is blue to represent the beautiful blue sky. Please bring your Khadag greet with Mongols.

Mongolian Calligraphy
The Classic Mongolian script written from the top downwards and in clockwise turns and has a classic vertical direction which expresses the almost optimal movement of handwriting due to the theory of probability.

Yohor Dance
Yohor is a circle dance. Buryat Mongol peoples have some form of circle dance. Yohor is the Buryat version. The chief characteristics in this belief is the concept of the world axis, represented by a tree, by the serge, or by the oboo. As part of these customs there is the use of the circle dance for shamanist ritual and worship at these places which is called the yohor. The dance may encircle the sacred tree or object, or the shaman who is conducting a ritual. These circle dances may last for hours, and are punctuated by the phrases yohor-o or heeyo. The yohor is extremely ancient and is depicted on rock carvings thousands of years old.

NYC Mongol Library display

Mongol Library Project
Sep 2011 to Sep 2013
NYC Mongol Library is designed to provide the opportunity to explore the richness of Mongol history.
The Mongol Heritage Foundations Library provides many interesting and informative books in Mongolian, and English pertaining to Mongol history, art, geography, literature, and culture. In addition, recreational reading includes periodicals, newspapers, biographies, magazines, novels, and materials about travel.
Members can also enjoy video cassettes such as Mongol, Kalmyk , Tuvan, Hazara, Buryat, Inner Mongolian films, biographies, travel, documentaries, and life stories of Mongol Americans. We encourage members to check out books, and other materials, and reap the richness of Mongol, and Mongol-American history, events, culture, and experiences

Mongol Heritage Foundation Membership application
Mongol Heritage Foundation 2013-2014 Events Calendar

Food Tasting

Tsagaan idée -dairy products such as cheeses and hard curds

Byaslag
Cheese from milk of cattle, yaks, goats, or sheep.
Most commonly, the milk of yak and cattle is used. Goats and sheep are not milked in all places, but make for the most aromatic cheese. However, mongolian cheese doesn’t get to ripen like its european counterparts, so the overall taste is somewhat bland in comparison.

Korkhoi Aaruul
“Worm Aaruul” is a variation in the shape of little strands, often sweetened. Don’t press the fresh material, but put it through a meat grinder (available in every mongolian houshold) into small “worms”. Arrange those in little heaps for drying. This type of Aaruul is easier to chew (especially for children), but less suited for travel supplies.

Khailmag
khailmag, made from a mixture of shortening, water, flour, and sugar, pan-fried at a ridiculously high temperature until clarified oil separates at the sides of the pan. Reconstituted raisins are then added to the mix, and the result is a warm, delicious sludge that resembles a not-too-cheesy cheesecake

Suutei Tsai- The most favored drink during this holiday is Mongol milk tea .Milk tea is an indispensable part of the Mongolian’s daily life.

khuushuur
One of the Mongolian most famous delicious meals is of course the Khuushuur. It’s a meal that consist of meat, onions and other ingredients put together and wrapped with flour dough, and afterwards it’s fried in oil. Everyone loves the taste of khuushuur in Mongolia..Mongolians hold the fresh khuushuur between their palms and also with the tips of all fingers to stimulate the nerves and blood circulation in the hands. This is believed to be curative. In some occasions, a hot khuushuur is placed on the soles of the feet and other selected places to treat neurosis and health conditions related to the balance of the air element of the five elements composing the human body.

Boortsog
Boortsog Mongolian Deep Fried Cookies

After Party
There will be Naadam Party starting at 10pm;

Music
DJ Baagii Beatz is pleased to announce the music for NYC Mongols

Naadam celebration 2013. The music has a largely Mongol theme. Event organizers have put considerable thought into selecting the music, and their choices blend traditional music with some newly commissioned pieces.

Address :BOSS Lounge @ Ktown; 10 West 32nd Street 5th Floor
New York, NY 10001.

RSVP: 718.749.6006, 347.437.9265

http://www.mixcrate.com/djbaagii
https://www.facebook.com/DjBaagiiBeatz

 

 

 

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A day celebrating Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity in Princeton, New Jersey


March 7, 2013: A March 2013 issue of the eTolbo has been published with additional material covering the 2012 Chinggis Khan Ceremony. Please make sure to read the well-written, first-person account of one of the attendees of the Chinggis Khan Ceremony! Many thanks to  Sansar Tsakhirmaa
I first became aware of the Mongol American Cultural Association (MACA) when I was googling for information on Mongolic communities based in the U.S. approximately four years ago. By visiting MACA’s website for the first time, I was also informed that a ceremony-featuring ethnocommunal gathering has been held on a yearly basis since the late 1980s. Having long yearned for connecting to the small,dispersed, but proud Mongolic communities in the American Northeast, in November,2012, I was lucky enough to reach Princeton and witness in person the burgeoning spirit of Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity that would not be similarly feltelsewhere. Not a historian, I’m not going to recount the founding myths of Mongolic peoples. Not a poet, I’m not going to couch my feeling with the event in literary phrases. Instead, as a student of social science, I consider that November day as one raising the consciousness of Mongolic identity, solidarity, and diversity within our diasporic communities and inviting further dialogues and even brotherly supports across our communities in Mongolia-the-independent-state, Southern Mongolia, Kalmyk, Buryatia, Tuva, and Hazaristan. Ethno national identity tells one who he or she is, who he or she is not,and of which group he or she may claim membership. The shared distinct self-identification of being ethnically Mongolic, regardless of whatever tribal affiliations, whatever religious practices, whatever linguistic nuances, whatever historical trajectories,would not have been around without an essentially similar collective memory of the political entity founded by Chinggis Khan centuries ago that gave rise to what is later known as a common claim to be Mongolic. However, in our times, such a common allegiance has rarely been hailed in an all-inclusive manner until MACA’s magnanimous efforts. While those from Mongolia-the-independent-state may not only claim their Mongolic identity but also be recognized as such, those of Mongolic heritages but from outside Mongolia may have, to varying extent, to inhibit their Mongolic identities for practical reasons. In this regard, the génie of Chinggis Khan Memorial Ceremony consists in its offering an opportunity for Mongolic peoples outside Mongolia the-independent-state to jointly and unfetteredly assert their
Mongolic identities, even if that lasts for only one day. Thus, many of our ethnic kins who may use non-Mongolic languages in daily life drove hundreds of miles for the annual gathering simply to “reboot” the aspect of their identity for which they want recognition and preservation.If coming together in honor of Chinggis Khan were all about identity, then we might ignore how much the event is also meant for promoting greater mutual contact,understanding, network, kinship, and even empathetic feelings among different Mongolic groups, among individuals within a group,and among individuals across groups. I positively noticed that attendees, different Mongolic groups as they represent, were not necessarily concentrated according to specific group or regional identities, but presented a tendency to seat themselves randomly, which had the potential of facilitating conversations between individuals who might previously have had little knowledge about one another’s Mongolic heritage. The event was also my first of its kind where members of different Mongolic groups had an opportunity to appreciate one another’s music, songs, and dances all within one sitting. I was no less impressed with the already-established cross-group networks evinced at the reception where members of different Mongolic groups were able to proactively approach one another. A day of building consciousness of one an other’s existence and experience may pave way for further interactions conducive to the development of emotional attachment. Such attachment will be indispensable in order to genuinely bind various Mongolic groups together by transcending the linguistic, religious,cultural, historical,and political barriers that give them myriad justifications not to build solidarity with one another. Solidarity building does not need to come at the expense of the amazingly diverse historical, cultural, religious, and linguistic heritages various Mongolic peoples claim. If MACA designates this annual ceremonial event for allowing people of Mongolic roots to assert a common identity as well as for generating greater cohesion among them, then it can equally be understood as a stage on which for Mongolic peoples to share with one another the unique and distinct aspect of their identity.
The dancers and singers from Mongolia-the-independent-state represented the most-blossoming and best-supported of Mongolic cultural traditions by showcasing the biyelgee dance as well as the inebriatingly beautiful operatic singing’s developed out of folk songs (ardiin duu). In the meantime, the band from the Ordos subregion of Southern Mongolia signaled to attendees a persistent and unrelenting pride Southern Mongolians take in their Mongolic identity by graciously blending both ethnic andpopular elements into their rendition and by offering a medley of Southern Mongolian folk songs that people like me have been so much missing. Buryat artist Namgar Lkhasaranova and the other two ethnomusicians demonstrated the highly distinct musical heritage of the Buryat people in Southern Siberia that I had not been able to contemplate until at the event. As the first Mongolic community settled in the U.S. and the most significant proponents of MACA, Kalmyks dedicated their fusion of Oiratic and North Caucasus traditions, which again invited various Mongolic peoples to marvel at our diversity. Though subjected to mass deportation in the mid-1940s, Kalmyks not only maintained their ethnic morale, but also initiated the presence of Mongolic peoples in the U.S. The representation of the Iranic-speaking Hazara people at the ceremony can also be marked as an example of re-oriented ethnonational consciousness and of the tremendous cultural and historical diversity among Mongolic peoples we have yet to explore. Hereby, another génie of MACA’s annual Chinggis Khan Memorial Ceremony is its serving as probably the only occasion, tomy knowledge, to be able to integrate a widest possible range of Mongolic diversity into one theme.
Thanks to pioneers of our senior generations from Southern Mongolia (Övör Mongol),Kalmykia (Xalimag), and Mongolia-the-independent-state (Ar Mongol) who sowed the seeds for a Pan-Mongolic communal tradition in the U.S., this annual gathering has been hopefully achieving a threefold mission: commemorating a common founding hero, Chinggis Khan, who laid the foundation for the distinct identities Mongolic peoples hail today, congregating people of various Mongolic heritages to facilitate their mutual understandings as well as to revive ethnic kinship that has been historically undermined, as well as consolidating support from the greater U.S. society with regard to issues concerning the Mongolic world. In retrospect, this year we have had music and dance heritages of Mongolia-the-independent-state, Southern Mongolia, Kalmykia, Buryatia represented. In prospect, perhaps next year there would be those of Tuva and Hazaristan added?

 

Mongols United Party NYC


NYC Mongols Presents

“Mongols United Party”

New york City Area Mongolian, Buryat, Kalmyk , Hazara , Southern Mongolians, RPCV-Mongolia , American friends then others .

When :July 29th , 2012

Where : Harmony Terrace 47-57 41st St, Sunny side, NY 11104

Time : 8:00 pm to 2:00 am

Tax : 15$

Program :

Who, Why , ……….Damn Mongols
Beginning with Facebook Match for Single’s Marathon
Dance Competition
Surprise

Call reservation 202-718-4638

The Kalmyks: The Mongols who were left Behind


 

This film was created by Dechen Kelden, a Kalmyk Mongolian who was born and raised in Jackson, NJ. She is a current student at Sarah Lawrence College who took on this project to create an accessible film for young Kalmyks to learn about their history as an Oirat group from the Western Steppes of Mongolia. She is interested in Cultural Preservation studies and working within the Tibetan community based in New York City.
This film is currently a sample and will be expanded upon in the near future with additional interviews and a possible Russian translation.

Any questions or comments please email kalmykmovie@yahoo.com

Directed by Dechen Kelden
Produced and Edited by Tenzin Wangchuk

 

Meet the Kalmyks

Meet the Kalmyks


A tiny Jersey ethnic group traces its roots to Mongolia and Genghis Khan.

Route 9 and Freehold suggest Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” and the lyrics, “Sprung from cages on Highway 9” and “Baby, this town rips the bones from your back.” They don’t conjure up the quietude of the three Buddhist temples and the Mongolian people known as the Kalmyks I encountered recently just off Route 9 and just south of Freehold.

Never heard of the Kalmyks? Neither had I, until I learned that this group of approximately 3,000 people—mostly New Jerseyans centered in Howell Township—is celebrating its 60th anniversary as Americans in 2011. New Jersey must indeed be the nation’s most ethnically diverse state if we have ethnic groups most of us have never even heard of. This year’s New Jersey Folk Festival, which often focuses on one of the state’s ethnic groups—its music, dance, and folklore—is featuring the Kalmyks on April 30 at an all-day event on the Douglass Campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick.

The Kalmyks’ native land, Kalmykia, is one of the republics of the former USSR that remains within the Russian Federation today, with a population of about 350,000. It is the only predominantly Mongol and Buddhist land in Europe. Many Kalmyks, siding with the Whites against the Reds, fled the Soviet Union during the Bolshevik Revolution, and the remaining Kalmyks were deported to Siberia during World War II because of alleged anti-Soviet sympathies. It was not until 1951 that Kalmyks began to come to New Jersey. Earlier, they had been rejected under the Asian Exclusion Acts (repealed in 1943) and immigration quotas based on race (repealed in 1965). They found an ally in the United States Attorney General who argued that since Kalmykia is in European Russia, the Kalmyks are Europeans not Asians, going so far as to insist that they are “Caucasians”—which is silly, but so is racism.

Virtually all of the Kalmyks who began coming to New Jersey in 1951 had spent the years after World War II in displaced persons camps in Germany. They ended up there because, as the Nazis began their long retreat after the Battle of Stalingrad, some Kalmyks followed, staying just ahead of the Soviet Army.

Russian emigres living in the Howell area and the Tolstoy Foundation, which assists new immigrants, were instrumental in sponsoring the Kalmyks in New Jersey. In addition to the Kalmyk Buddhist temples there are several Russian Orthodox churches in Howell, as evidenced by their onion-shaped domes. Howell and Lakewood, farther south on Route 9, are thriving centers of Russo-American culture in New Jersey. (There also is a small Kalmyk contingent with one temple in Philadelphia.)

Originally a nomadic people, the Kalmyks were one of the innumerable tribes united by Genghis Khan in the course of conquering much of Europe and Asia in the 12th and early 13th centuries. When the Mongolian Empire faded into retreat, the Kalmyks were incorporated into Russia.

American Kalmyks speak English, of course, but may also speak Russian and Kalmyk. Anyone who has seen the Star Wars movies has heard Kalmyk spoken. It is the language of the Ewoks, those furry, cuddly bipeds living on the moon of Endor who, you may recall, were easily understood by the linguistically gifted robot, C-3PO.

It is almost as if one is on a New Jersey version of the moon of Endor when standing on Kalmuk Road (Kalmyk is spelled in a variety of ways) just short of where it becomes a dirt road leading to the Tashi Lhunpo Temple. The street may be considered the physical center of Kalmyk life in New Jersey; it inspired the title of a book in 2004, The Street—Kalmuk Road.

I find myself inside the temple’s social hall along with Maria Taunov and Augnel “Alta” Buruschkin, and also a monk serving us tea. I am told that the way to greet a monk is with a two-handed handshake, one’s forehead lowered onto the linked hands. The monk good-naturedly laughs at my clumsy greeting.

Most monks in Kalmyk temples are Tibetans. The Dalai Lama, recognized as the spiritual leader of the Kalmyks, has visited the Howell temples. Says Buruschkin, “I get up at 5 am every day and chant my prayers for two hours. This is what the Dalai Lama does, and I try to pattern myself after His Holiness.”
On arriving in their new land, most Kalmyks entered the building trades but, over the years, gravitated into electronics, professional careers and white-collar jobs. Buruschkin works for a consulting company. Taunov is a legal assistant at a New York City law firm, commuting to work and chanting her morning prayers quietly on the bus. On weekends she chants them at the altar found in most Kalmyk homes.

Taunov also teaches Buddhist principles to children at one of the temples on weekends. “There are great assimilationist pressures,” she says. “I know who I am, but I want Kalmyk children to know who they are.” Kalmyk families tend to be closer than other American families. Many households are multigenerational, and there is great deference paid to the elders as well as veneration of ancestors. “American freedom and openness are wonderful,” Taunov says, “but they make for more intermarriage and fewer children, because Kalmyk women, like other American women, don’t want to be confined to the home.”

I was introduced to Taunov and Buruschkin by Nicholas Olefer Jr., a Caucasian of Russian descent who is a convert to Buddhism and is on the New Jersey Folk Festival board. Olefer lives in Westchester County and practices and receives instruction at a Buddhist monastery in Carmel, New York. “No one cares who you are in a Buddhist environment; they care who your teacher is,” Olefer explains.

The Kalmyks believe in reincarnation—as do Hindus—but they prefer the term “rebirth.” I can’t say I really understand the difference, but I was struck by the eerie sincerity with which Buruschkin told me, “I lived during Buddha’s time, but I didn’t pay attention. Now I’m paying attention.”

Later in the day, the three took me to Rashi Gempil-Ling, another of the Buddhist temples just off Route 9. There were two buildings, a small one essentially empty except for a large prayer wheel—a round, beautifully decorated device believed to contain a million printed prayers wrapped around a central core. “We spin the wheel as a means of getting our prayers to multiply as they fly out into the world,” says Buruschkin, who has a small prayer wheel in his home.

We removed our shoes and entered the temple, where a service was going on. Everyone sat on the floor on pillows. One was handed to me, and I did my best to resurrect an earlier familiarity with the lotus position, only to develop a cramp in my left leg. The service was presided over by Art Engle, a Caucasian lay-teacher married to a Kalmyk woman. Engle has a PhD. in Buddhist studies from the University of Wisconsin. The service was conducted in Tibetan, and Engle swayed side to side as he chanted, as did many of those in attendance, including a Buddhist nun. I was struck by the fact that half the people at the service were non-Asian.

It was peaceful in the temple. I didn’t relish the prospect of facing the traffic for the drive home. The temple was only feet from Springsteen’s Route 9 and the suggestion, as in “Born to Run,” that one should flee the rapid pulse of New Jersey life. But in that temple, if only for a short while, I found an oasis of calm.

Contributing writer Michael Aaron Rockland’s two most recent books are Stones, a novel, and The George Washington Bridge: Poetry in Steel. A forthcoming memoir will cover the years he spent in Spain as a cultural attaché.

Source:http://njmonthly.com/articles/lifestyle/people/meet-the-kalmyks.html

Celebration for Gevsha Sonam


On behalf of the Kalmyk Brotherhood Society, it is our honor to announce that our monk, Sonam, has been named a Gevsha by His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

We’d like to invite you to a humble celebration for him on Saturday, June 2nd at 12PM at the Temple of St. Zonkava in Philadelphia.

Food and soft drink donations are appreciated.  Because we are honoring our Gevsha, we ask that you refrain from bringing alcohol.

Please let me know if you have any questions.
Kindest Regards,
Natalie Abuschinow – Schneider
Recording Secretary
Kalmyk Brotherhood Society

http://www.kalmykphilly.org/

Email : kalmykphilly@gmail.com

KALMYK-AMERICANS RECOGNIZED BY JERSEY TELEVISION


Once a year, the Jersey Access Group, a forum for promoting quality operations for New Jersey’s public television stations, holds an awards ceremony to recognize video excellence from the previous year.
The winner in the category of “Diversity Programming” for 2011 was a program on “Kalymk-American Traditions” hosted by Angus Kress Gillespie. The program was broadcast by East Brunswick Television as part of Gilespie’s series “Old Ways in New Jersey.”
The program showcased the little-known group of about 3,000 Kalmyk-Americans in New Jersey. Their community was originally established during the 1950s in Howell, New Jersey. These people were originally refugees from Russia and were rapidly assimilated.
In the program, Gillespie interviewed Tserendorj Amarhanov, who is representative of the revival of Kalmyk culture around the world. Amaranhov was born in Philadelphia in 1980 and raised in the greater Philadelphia area.
He left America at the age of 17 and lived in both Kalmykia and Mongolia before returning to the U.S. at age 21. He is a Kalmyk folk-musician, multi-instrumentalist, composer and throat-singer.
Amarhanov is not only a musician, but also a historian and spokesman for the group, which has a fascinating history

KALMYK-AMERICANS RECOGNIZED BY JERSEY TELEVISION:

http://cvp.telvue.com/player?id=T01258&video=20845&mini=1

“The Gulls” A Kalmyk Film


A psychological drama depicting the fate of a young woman wanting to get away from her husband, but his unexpected death opens a new perspective on life.

Director Ella Manzheeva.
Cameraman Alexandr Kuznetsov.

Filming is planned to start in Kalmykia next winter once enough funds are raised. for clarification, THIS FILM CAN ONLY CONTINUE PRODUCTION ONCE ENOUGH FUNDS ARE RAISED. If anyone is interested in sponsoring or donating to the creation of THIS KALMYK FILM please contact Elena Churyumov at l_batyreva@yahoo.com

THIS WILL BE ONE OF THE FIRST FEW MOVIES DIRECTED, PRODUCED, AND FILMED IN KALMYKIA BY KALMYKS. such a good opportunity and a great cause, especially to those interested in contributing to the endangered population (which is ultimately contributing to your own and your family’s access to something Kalmyk). Be apart of something new.

http://yakhalaba.tumblr.com/page/2

To recognize the endangerment of the Kalmyk cultural and to help unify the Kalmyks

To recognize the endangerment of the Kalmyk cultural and to help unify the Kalmyks


Mendit! To recognize the endangerment of the Kalmyk cultural and to help unify the Kalmyk s (and related peoples) separated by lands and waters, this blog is designed to create a safe place for education in, preservation of, and pride in the identity. Cultural revolution (via social media), anyone?

Run by New Jersey born half-Kalmyk college student: Elena “Lanie” Emelchin Brunner of the Ombadykow/Ivanchukov flavor.

http://yakhalaba.tumblr.com/

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama “The Essence of Buddhism”

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama “The Essence of Buddhism”


A teaching and Blessing by

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama

” The Essence  of Buddhism”

Hosted by :

The Kalmyk Three Jewels Foundation & The Tibetan Community of New York & New Jersey

Lincoln Center , NY

October 21,2012

1:30-3:30 pm

Tickets will go on sale later this year Details of sponsorship packages will be sent out as soon as they are available

Please Contact : dalailamalincolncenter@gmail.com with any questions

http://www.dalailamalincolncenter.com

Ova Fundraiser Picnic & Soccer Game

Ova Fundraiser Picnic & Soccer Game


Kalmyk Mongolian Buddhist Center & the members of Tashi Lhunpo Temple invite you to our
Ova Fundraiser Picnic & Soccer Game!!

When :Saturday, May 19th, 2012

Where :Olna Gazur, 12 Kalmuck Rd, Howell, NJ 07731

Ticket :Adult 14+ – $15 * Children 6-13 – $10 Family Special (up to 2 Adults and their children) $50

Soccer Game

10:00 AM @ Soldier Memorial Park, Lakewood Famingdale Road, Howell,
NJ

Last warm up before the

2012 “All-Mongolian” Soccer Tournament, May 25-26 2012, in Las Vegas!

Contact: Bembe Balsirow @ 732-740-7163

Ova Services 1:00 PM – Tashi Lhunpo Temple

Picnic  2:30 PM @ Olna Gazur

Bring a Food Donation & Get a Free Raffle Ticket!! *Raffles$ Volleyball Horseshoes Children’s Games Prizes$ & More !! *

All Donations are Welcome!!

For more information, please contact:

Dorie Tchourumoff  856-235-8417

Bembe Balsirow        732-740-7163

Tsagan & David Sanderson  732-222-4233

For more information and updates see http://www.olnagazur.org