Tag: hazara

NYC Mongol Naadam Celebration


Naadam rider 1
Naadam rider 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival.
English: Wrestling in the 2005 Naadam festival. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

NYC Mongol Naadam

 

 

 

Please join us on Saturday July 6th for Mongol Heritage
Foundation’s Naadam Celebration.

Mongol Heritage Foundation & NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project in the NYC is holding First annual Naadam celebration in near Bethesda Fountain ,Central Park , New York. The celebration will be opened by H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations.

The NYC Mongols celebration “Naadam” 2013 will take place on Saturday July 6th from 11:00am – 7:00 pm at the west side of the “Bethesda Fountain” Central Park where the Mongol tradition of “Naadam” will happen among the all Mongol people who live in the greater New York area.

This Festivity is the one of the major celebration on the Mongols honor of the national holiday of Motherland Mongolia. During the celebration, Mongolians compete in traditional sporting events and competitions that include , wrestling, and children’s wood horse racing.
In 2010, Naadam was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

We encourage you to invite your friends and family to this exciting and interesting event where the New York Area Mongols will join together in a traditional celebration.

All of the Mongols including Buryats, Kalmyks, Hazaras ,Tuvans and Inner Mongolians are join in the celebration.

Everyone who is interested in Mongolia and Mongol Culture is invited; people who are interested in Mongolia and the Mongolian Culture such as Americans who have lived and worked in Mongolia through the Peace Corps will attend.

Where: The Bethesda Fountain, Central Park is one of the largest fountains in New York, measuring twenty-six feet high by ninety-six feet wide.It is one of the most well known fountains in the world.This neoclassical sculpture, also known as Angel of the Waters, features an eight-foot bronze angel who stands above four small cherubim representing health, purity, temperance, and peace.

Location: Bethesda Fountain, Central Park
The Mall, New York, NY 10024

When: Saturday, July 6,
Time: 11 :00 am till 7:00 pm

Opening Welcome, H.E. Ambassador Od Och, Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations

Greetings
Inner Mongolian Community Mr. Hasar Ayush
Kalmyk Community Ms. Kermen
Buryat Community Ms. Tsengiyev
Hazara Community Liquate Ali
Kalmyk Project NYC
Mongolian Ambulance Project
Wild Art Mongolia 2013 Expedition

The President of the Mongol Heritage Foundation Byambakhuu Darinchuluun will go over the agenda of the event

Program Highlights

Wrestling
Children’s Wood Horse Race
Children’s Shagai (ankle bone ) Game

Featuring:

Mongolian Song
Kalmyk Song
Buryat Song
Tsakhar song,
Hazara Song
Yokhor “Circle ” dancing

Contest
“I am mongol ” painting contest
The Best Traditional Mongolian male, female, and child’s clothing contest
Mongolian singing contest
Closing Ceremony Singing all Mongols .National Song (Warm Hear ted Land )

Main Organizers:
Mongol Heritage Foundation and NYC Mongols, Kalmyk Project NYC,

Supporting Organizations:

Permanent Mission of Mongolia to United Nations,
Hazara Organization Progress and Equality
Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center

Sponsor:
Mongol American Cultural Association, Advanced Accounting, Sign. Inc and the NYC Inner Mongolian , Kalmyk, Hazara, Buryat, Tuva , Mongolian community

Media:
Writer, journalist , Louie Lazar
http://www.louielazar.com/

Asian Fusion Magazine , General Editor, Rick Lin
http://www.asianfusion-mag.com/

Get involved :You’ll meet new Mongol people, have fun and support a great event.

Let Mongol Culture Alive in New York City Tri-state Area

Volunteering, Partner and Sponsor Call :

Byambakhuu Darinchuluun Mongolia (347) 437-9265,
Dawood Changazi Hazara (347) 400-8591,
Kermen Dyumkeeva Kalmyk (347) 221-9123
Enkhbat Toochig Inner Mongolia (917)698-4367

Please bring food to share and your beverages to drink. There will be Mongolian food and games to play.

Boortsog, suutei tsai, byaslag and plates, napkins, silverware, etc. will be provided by the Mongol Heritage Foundation .

What to expect:
some ideas on what to expect and what you should do when you attend during Naadam Event.

Children’s Wooden Hobby Horse Rising
Although the NYC Naadam is scaled back somewhat (there’s no archery competition, and a child’s footrace replaces the horse race), the wrestling competition is the main attraction.

Naadam Dress

Mongol Malgai , Mongol Deel, Khantaaz,

Wrestling
Mongolian traditional wrestling is an untimed competition in which wrestlers lose if they touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet or hand. When picking pairs, the wrestler with the greatest fame has the privilege to choose his own opponent. Wrestlers wear two-piece costumes consisting of a tight shoulder vest (zodog) and shorts (shuudag). Only men are allowed to participate.Each wrestler has an “encourager” called a zasuul. The zasuul sings a song of praise for the winning wrestler after rounds 3, 5, and 7.
Winners of the 7th or 8th stage earn the title of zaan, “elephant”. The winner of the 9th or 10th stage, is called arslan, “lion”. In the final competition, all the “zasuuls” drop in the wake of each wrestler as they take steps toward each other. Two time arslans are called the titans / giants, or avraga.

Shagai
Shagai games are especially popular during the Mongolian summer holiday of Naadam. In shagai dice, the rolled shagai generally land on one of four sides: horse, camel, sheep or goat.
Mongolians still exchange shagai today as tokens of friendship. The shagai may be kept in a little pouch.A large variety of traditional Mongolian games are played using the shagai pieces. Depending on the game, the anklebones may be tossed like dice, flicked like marbles, shot at with arrows, caught in the hands, or simply collected according to the roll of a die. In many games, the side on which a tossed piece lands (horse, sheep, camel, or goat) is significant.

Khadag
Typically it is blue to represent the beautiful blue sky. Please bring your Khadag greet with Mongols.

Mongolian Calligraphy
The Classic Mongolian script written from the top downwards and in clockwise turns and has a classic vertical direction which expresses the almost optimal movement of handwriting due to the theory of probability.

Yohor Dance
Yohor is a circle dance. Buryat Mongol peoples have some form of circle dance. Yohor is the Buryat version. The chief characteristics in this belief is the concept of the world axis, represented by a tree, by the serge, or by the oboo. As part of these customs there is the use of the circle dance for shamanist ritual and worship at these places which is called the yohor. The dance may encircle the sacred tree or object, or the shaman who is conducting a ritual. These circle dances may last for hours, and are punctuated by the phrases yohor-o or heeyo. The yohor is extremely ancient and is depicted on rock carvings thousands of years old.

NYC Mongol Library display

Mongol Library Project
Sep 2011 to Sep 2013
NYC Mongol Library is designed to provide the opportunity to explore the richness of Mongol history.
The Mongol Heritage Foundations Library provides many interesting and informative books in Mongolian, and English pertaining to Mongol history, art, geography, literature, and culture. In addition, recreational reading includes periodicals, newspapers, biographies, magazines, novels, and materials about travel.
Members can also enjoy video cassettes such as Mongol, Kalmyk , Tuvan, Hazara, Buryat, Inner Mongolian films, biographies, travel, documentaries, and life stories of Mongol Americans. We encourage members to check out books, and other materials, and reap the richness of Mongol, and Mongol-American history, events, culture, and experiences

Mongol Heritage Foundation Membership application
Mongol Heritage Foundation 2013-2014 Events Calendar

Food Tasting

Tsagaan idée -dairy products such as cheeses and hard curds

Byaslag
Cheese from milk of cattle, yaks, goats, or sheep.
Most commonly, the milk of yak and cattle is used. Goats and sheep are not milked in all places, but make for the most aromatic cheese. However, mongolian cheese doesn’t get to ripen like its european counterparts, so the overall taste is somewhat bland in comparison.

Korkhoi Aaruul
“Worm Aaruul” is a variation in the shape of little strands, often sweetened. Don’t press the fresh material, but put it through a meat grinder (available in every mongolian houshold) into small “worms”. Arrange those in little heaps for drying. This type of Aaruul is easier to chew (especially for children), but less suited for travel supplies.

Khailmag
khailmag, made from a mixture of shortening, water, flour, and sugar, pan-fried at a ridiculously high temperature until clarified oil separates at the sides of the pan. Reconstituted raisins are then added to the mix, and the result is a warm, delicious sludge that resembles a not-too-cheesy cheesecake

Suutei Tsai- The most favored drink during this holiday is Mongol milk tea .Milk tea is an indispensable part of the Mongolian’s daily life.

khuushuur
One of the Mongolian most famous delicious meals is of course the Khuushuur. It’s a meal that consist of meat, onions and other ingredients put together and wrapped with flour dough, and afterwards it’s fried in oil. Everyone loves the taste of khuushuur in Mongolia..Mongolians hold the fresh khuushuur between their palms and also with the tips of all fingers to stimulate the nerves and blood circulation in the hands. This is believed to be curative. In some occasions, a hot khuushuur is placed on the soles of the feet and other selected places to treat neurosis and health conditions related to the balance of the air element of the five elements composing the human body.

Boortsog
Boortsog Mongolian Deep Fried Cookies

After Party
There will be Naadam Party starting at 10pm;

Music
DJ Baagii Beatz is pleased to announce the music for NYC Mongols

Naadam celebration 2013. The music has a largely Mongol theme. Event organizers have put considerable thought into selecting the music, and their choices blend traditional music with some newly commissioned pieces.

Address :BOSS Lounge @ Ktown; 10 West 32nd Street 5th Floor
New York, NY 10001.

RSVP: 718.749.6006, 347.437.9265

http://www.mixcrate.com/djbaagii
https://www.facebook.com/DjBaagiiBeatz

 

 

 

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION OF HAZARA MONGOL


 

BY: ISHAQ MOHAMMADI

ISHAQ MOHAMMADI

Respected guests! It is a great honor to be here and celebrate 850th anniversary of the greatest conqueror in human history. The Great Gengez Khan was not only a great warrior but also a great thinker of his time, who bestowed a comprehensive law in the form of YASA to his people and other entire conquered nations. It is a matter of sorrow that some historians especially Iranians and Arabs have mentioned him and his successors as barbaric while it is a fact that on the contrary he, along with his successors brought peace, stability, justice and prosperity to all the conquered regions and introduced unique kinds of knowledge and art. It was Mongols who promoted miniature art to its peak especially during the Ilkhante period (Ikhan means younger Khan). They also promoted the new form of history writing which we  in Persian say “WAQAE NIGARI” or narration of facts. Some famous Muslim historians like Rashid-ud-Din-Fazlluah, Juwayni, Wassaf etc are  gifts of Ilkhante Mongol dynasty. The famous kind of Persian inscription “NASTALIQ” that is being used till now, is also the gift of the Great khan’s successors.

Honorable guests! It is not possible for me to shed light on the life of this greatest conqueror of the world but it is a good opportunity to introduce briefly my Hazara nation who is a part of “ULUS MUQUUL” that  the Great Khan himself named in spring 1206,s “QORALTAE” or grand assembly  held in “QURAQURAM”. Historians, who know Hazaras, believe that they are pure Mongol or some believe that they are turcko-Mongolian origin. It is correct that some Turkic tribes like QALAJ, QARLUQ , TURKMAN etcare now part of Hazara nation but the big portion of Hazara nation consists of pure Mongol origin. Like DAE CHOPAN (an Ilkhante commander), DAE BERKA(a Mongol commander), , ARGHUN (Il Khanate Commander), NEKODAR(Jughtain commander)or  BESUD .It  would be  very interesting for the audience to know that in Hazara BESUD there is a sub-tribe with the name of  “BURJAQIN”  which is believed to be the name of the tribe of the Great Khan himself. It is worth mentioning that the Turk tribe like NAEMAN is now part of Hazara nation but was merged into “ULUS MUQUUL” by the Great Khan. Historically it has been proved that up to the early 16th century some Hazara tribes were speaking Mongolian language as mentioned by king Babur the founder of Mughul dynasty in India in his famous book TUZKI BABURI. Despite the similarity of tribal names there are dozens of places in Hazarajat with the purely Mongolian name like JIGHATU near Ghazni  (driven with name of JUGHTAEE, the Great Khan’s son), BU-SED (taken with the name of ILKHANATE king BU-SAEED). CHOPAN (an  ILKHANATE commander as mentioned earlier).

Honorable guests, in spite of all other historic facts, a scientific research carried by Oxford University Bio-Chemistry Department in 2003, also proved that Hazara people are Mongolian origin. It is worth to mention that a campaign has been initiated here in the United States to explore the origin of Hazara through complete DNA test. I am sure that the finding of this research will not be other than the research done by the Oxford University of Great Brittan.

Hazara as a new nation established a great kingdom under  Arghun dynasty  in early 16th century which consists from Kabul to Sindh (present Pakistan). Later on Babur captured Kabul and Qandahar but their rule remained intact on the vast areas of northern Balochistan, Sindh and Multan (present Pakistan) up to 1591 A.D. The reflection of  the glory of Arghun can be seen in “MUKHLI” graveyard Thatha, which was the capital of this dynasty. Keeping in view the unique style of construction MUKHLI has been entitled as “World Heritage”.

Honorable guests!  Unfortunately the deprivation of Hazara started on the rise of Safavid in Iran. Safavid captured Qandahar in 1653A.D and posted Gargin Khan as governor with a clear intention to expel Hazara Mongol from plain lands of Heart to Kabul. He did complete this task by pushing Hazaras from their plain lands and planted a new Pashtoon Ghalzai tribe on the occupied Hazara lands. This occupation process kept continued and even made faster during ABDALID in 18th century. And this policy was finalized by Amir Abdur Rehman during 1880 to 1893 who annexed Hazarajat the land of Hazara nation and made part of his new Afghan kingdom (Afghanistan) forcefully. During 1880 to 1893 war, Amir Abdul Rehman has eliminated 62% of Hazaras in Hazarajat and disowned them of their fertile lands which were later on, distributed among Pashtoon nomads (Kochi). Therefore now historians agree that from hundred to hundred and fifty thousand square miles has been reduced in total area of Hazara home land.

Ladies and gentlemen! Despite all this massacre and genocide, Hazaras being a Mongol warrior not only exist in Afghanistan but now considered as a hope for a bright future of this war hit country because of their extra ordinary constructive abilities. Hazaras have got the highest education rate in Afghanistan in both genders. The  ever first Olympic medalist Rohullah Nekpai, ever first world boxing champion Hamid Rahimi, ever first female Governor Habiba Sarabi and ever first female Mayor Azra Jafferi  are the best proofs of being an extra ordinary nation in Afghanistan’s three centuries long history from one hand, while on the other hand it also reflect to their Mongolian origin ethnicity in which women had and still have a significant role in the society. Otherwise in Afghanistan like orthodox Muslim scenario, women are considered as an absurd product.

Honorable guests! During the Dark Age of Abdur Rehman and later on during Taliban era a large number of Hazaras were compelled to leave their home land Hazarajat and take refuge in neighboring countries. A huge number took refuge in Iran but unfortunately because of their Mongolian back ground they are being treated in-human and called Hazaras as BARBARI, which means barbarian. Hazaras are still struggling to use their original name in Iran but only have been allowed to use the meaningless name of KHAWARI (Eastern people) instead of Hazara. However, in British India Now Pakistan they were treated equally. Therefore, they flourished in all aspects of life quickly. Just imagine that a young Hazara Musa Khan recruited in British army as a common soldier but by his Mongol genetic ability he rose to the post of Commander In Chief of Pakistan army. He successfully led Pakistan army in 1965 Indo-Pak war with 5 time bigger Indian army, however it will be interesting for audience to add that later, during in other war in 1971, this same Pakistan army not only lost his Eastern part present Bangladesh but also faced one of the world’s biggest army surrender of more than 95 thousand soldiers to the Indian army.

Ladies and gentlemen! Unfortunately for last 12 years this most educated and well organized Pakistani Hazaras are facing a wave of genocide and ethnic cleansing by state backed religious extremist militants. So far, more than 600 innocent Hazaras mostly educated and professional have been killed. Once again thousands of Hazaras have been compelled to take refuge in western countries and other thousands are seeking for. But despite all these, I firmly believe that being a Mongol we will survive because we are survivors of the fittest.

Honorable guests! Taking the opportunity of this historic occasion I want to mention here especially for my Mongolian historians and academicians that a huge first hand treasure of information about Great Mongols are available in Persian either in printed or manuscript forms in Iran Pakistan, Afghanistan and India or in big libraries of the world. No doubts without this treasure, compilation of an authentic comprehensive history of Great Mongols are almost impossible. Therefore, I humbly request to my Mongol academicians to take necessary steps for collection and translation of this treasure in to Mongolian and English. Due to shortage of time I am mentioning here a few basic famous sources:-

  1. 1.     Jame-u-tarikh or Compendium of Chronicles written by Rashid-ud-Din
  2. 2.     Tarikhi Jahan Gushah or The history of world conqueror  written by Malik Ata Juwayni
  3. 3.     Tarikhi Wassaf  written by Abdullah Wassaf

These published books were written during Ilkhanate period under direct supervision of Ilkanate kings. 

  1. 4.     Shah name-e-Changezi  un-published book, one manuscript copy is lying in British Museum. It seems that it has been written in poetry form in patron of famous Persian historic book Shah name-e-Firdausi.
  2. 5.     Turkhan Nama written by Syed Mir Mohammad Tatavi, it is about Hazara Arghun dynasty who ruled from Kabul to Sindh during  15th and 16th centuries.

Fortunately I have visited some old libraries in Sindh and Punjab Pakistan, there are dozens of valuable published or un-published historic books about Mongol history in Persian consist of first hand informations. It would be very interesting for my honorable guests that in 2008, I found two very rare books by the name of GHAZAN NAMA and another one OLJAETU NAMA which cover almost all official activities of these two Great kings of Ilkanate dynasty from Karachi Pakistan, in a Sunday footpath book bazaar.

At the end I would like to say especial thanx to birar Baymabakhuu who made possible all this arrangement and of course the organizers of this great event who provide me this opportunity to speak in such a great historic event with such an honorable audience. Thank you very much.

Note:- This write-up was presented in the event of 850th “Anniversary of Chinggis Khaan”   in Mongolian Embassy Washington DC, on May 5th. It was a two Days(May 4-5,2012) International Conference organized by “ The Mongolian Cultural Center Washington” and “The Embassy of Mongolia Washington” In partnership with “The Mongolian Institute for Defense Studies” With contribution from Mongol-American Cultural Association. Well renowned scholars from USA, Mongolia, Canada, Germany, Qazaqstan, Norway, Turkey, Azerbaijan and Korea were presented their articles and presentations. National Geographic Society’s Mr. Albert Yu Min Lin was also presented his presentation.

Source :http://www.wahdatnews.com

 

The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture

The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture


By: Salman Heydari
           
The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture was developed to increase awareness of the rich history and cultural heritage of the Hazara people from Afghanistan, who now live throughout the world. The Hazara ethnic group, the third largest in Afghanistan, is a culture that has survived despite genocide and decades of political oppression at the hands of the Taliban and other Afghan regimes.
            The lecture and exhibit are the work of Mohammed Rezaee, who emigrated to the U.S. eight years ago.  He now lives in metro Atlanta with his wife and family.  He has delivered the lecture several times in the Atlanta area, at the same time showing photographs (taken by professional photojournalists) of Hazara life, using computer technology to show the photos in large-scale, living color.
            More than hundred Americans, including high level officials, attended the opening on January 17, 2012, an evening reception at which the Americans were served Hazaragi foods, (Bosragh and Pirki) prepared by Mr. Rezaee’s wife.   They were also invited to a display of Hazaragi clothes.
            After the gallery reception Mr. Rezaee gave a lecture about the history of Hazaras and the current conditions of the Hazara people. Also, a brief history of Hazaras, which was written by a famous Hazara historian, Haji Kazim Yazdani, was distributed to those in attendance in a brochure format.
            There was a separate opening for Afghans. Mr. Baisr Dolatabadi, Mr. Abdul Khaliq Hazara, and Ishaq Mohammadi gave lectures—via Skype—about Hazaras’ history, culture, customs, and the current condition of the Hazara people.
            The on-going photo exhibit features works of Hazara photojournalists Hafize Besharat, Muzafer Ali, Barat Ali Batoor, Sajad Goher and Mohammad Rezaee, which had never been seen before in the United States. The photo exhibit (large framed copies of the photographs) was on display at Tucker Public Library, metro Atlanta, until March 28, 2012. Many Americans visited the photo exhibition.
            The lecture-exhibit will again be presented, at no cost, on June 14, 2012.   Georgia Perimeter College, which is one of the largest of Georgia’s institutions, will host the presentation at their Dunwoody Campus. The photo exhibit will be open to the public through July 13, 2012.
 You are cordially invited to attend the lecture for the opening of the photography exhibit, on Jun 14, 2012. The lecture will include a food tasting, a display of traditional clothing items, and discussion of the history and unique culture of the Hazara people.

The organizer of The Hazara of Afghanistan: Cultural Exhibit & Lecture’s Facebook page,